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NATIONAL BROADCAST COMPAQ lie 




2 APRIL I960 
40< a copy • $ft * year 



Vfo 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



SOT EM COVERED! 




IN THE NASHVILLE MARKET, 

ONLY WSIX 

an Fire 3 Barrels At One Time . . . 

off can't miss with coverage like this! 




WHICH ROAD 
FOR TV SHOW 
CONTROL? 

Trend is toward more 
net control, but some 
see a shift back to 
agencies and clients 

Page 35 



AFL-CIO puts 
70% of p.r. budgel 

into air media 

Page 38 

Babies— 
$1% billion 
ad headache 

Page 43 

SPECIAL SECTHJM: 

N A B Cc ntion 




When KSTP-TV says 
"GO OUT AND BUY IT". 

people 
go out 
and 
buy it! 

Represented by 
The Original Station Representative 



go® 

MINNEAPOLIS- ST. PAUL 

100,000 WATTS NBC 

A GOLD SEAL STATION 







50,000 WATT CKLW 



does . . . every day! 



(There are 290 of them between Thunder Bay Light in 
Northern Lake Huron and Dunkirk Light near Erie, 
Pa.), and we talk to hundreds of thousands of 
other housekeepers, too — the ones with dresses, 
husbands, children — and shopping budgets! 
Check your latest audience composition reports against 
ratings in the DETROIT QTGG. Your next step will 
be to call on an East/man. 

CKLW- 50,000 WATTS, n™ mo ,e *. 

ever, a must buy in the Great Lakes region. 

An RKO General Station 



tttttnuS* 



III! i'-.. 







A SALE OF TWO CITIES 

WSPA-TV sells the Spartanburg-Creen- 
ville SUPERMARKET! From its central 
tower location on Paris Mt." near Green- 
ville, WSPA-TV blankets the rich indus- 
trial areas in and around these twin cities. 
Over a quarter of a million TV homes in 
this area are directly influenced by 
WSPA-TV ... it is an important part 
of their daily lives. 

This section of the thickly populated 
Southern Piedmont is nationally recognized 
as the Big Market of today, and the Giant 
Market of tomorrow . . . WSPA-TV pro- 
gramming is tailored to serve and sell 
the Progressive Piedmont. 



WSPA-TV 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



in the ^^ 



The only CBS-VHF Station Servinc 

the Spartanburg-Greenville 

SUPERMARKET 

National Representatives: 
GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 






.Vol. 14, No. 14 • 2 APRIL I960 



^ SPONSOR 

4 THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Tv program control — where is it headed? 

35 Trend definitely appears to be toward more network-controlled tv shows 
in upcoming season. But will it be permanent, and what is "control"? 

How AFL-CIO budgets for p.r. 

38 Labor enters second decade of net radio news sponsorship, also produces 
radio tv public service features: air media gets 70% of p.r. budget 

New facts on out-of-home radio 

40 What are the facts about auto radio? Is it oversold or undersold? One 
thing, this non-home audience has become more than a bonus, buyers say 

Full-page real estate ads on tv 

42 T\ makes its mark in real estate advertising — long a print preserve; 
rings up over $100,000,000 in N.Y. home sales. $1,250,000 in Richmond 



Babies: SI 1 2 billion marketing headache 

43 Baby products have unique marketing, advertising and sales problems due 
to static 1 but constant 1 potential. Here's a rundown on major brands 



Night radio rolls up more sale surprises 

46 Costs and reach of nighttime attract variety of clients and sales results. 
Night pioneer WPTR. Albany, provides sample of job night radio can do 



FEATURES 

106 Film-Scope 

27 49th & Madison 

HO News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

HO Picture Wrap-lp 

56 Radio Results 

14 Sponsor Backstage 

122 SeQer'e Viewpoint 

52 Sponsor Asks 



108 Sponsor Hears 

1 9 Sponsor-Scope 

124 Sponsor Speaks 

55 Spot Buys 

50 Telepulse 

124 Ten-Second Spots 

30 Timebuyers at Work 

120 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

105 Washington Week 



Eiasi 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulate 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone, hi 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago OH-ice: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUper.or 7-9*63 Birmu 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office. 6087 ! 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimon 
Md. Subscriptions: U S. S8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray r' " 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltin 



I 8-2772. 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



CHANNEL 5 

WROC-TV 

AUDIENCE 

GROWS! 



Leads New York State's 3rd largest 

market with 31.5% more homes 

reached than station X. 



TOTAL TV HOMES REACHED: 



WROC-TV 

Station X 



327,200 

248,800 



NBC-ABC • CHANNEL 5 • ROCHESTER 

Represented by 

I Edward I Petry & I Co., Inc.) 



The Original Station Representative 




SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



WP.T* 





NOV. ARB RATING 



ujpta 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The naming of E. K. (Joe) Hartenbower as chairman of 
ISAB's Television Code Revieiv Board comes at a time when 
the board is undertaking the most active policing operation 
in its history. He will preside over an enlarged body of 
seven members and replaces W estinghouse" 1 s Don McGannon. 



The newsmaker: No board chairman of the Television 
Code has ever faced the armful of problems that nestles within the 
purview of Midwest broadcaster Joe Hartenbower. In addition to 
warding off legislative and public relations blows emanating from 
the nation's capital, he has set as his target the job of luring the 
more recalcitrant video outlets (mainly those in small markets) into 
embracing the industry's catechism 
of proper conduct. 

Hartenbower, who is vice presi- 
dent and general manager of 
Meredith's Kansas City broadcast- 
ing complex (KCMO-TV-FM, 
KOMO), is not unaware of the 
intricacies of convincing the in- 
dustry's less fortunate brethren 
that by-passing undesirable com- 
mercials (and the income thereof) 
will redound to the benefit of all. 

But Hartenbower says the prob- 
lem is not as tough as it sounds. 
In the first place, he feels that getting non-subscribers better ac- 
quainted with the code and its operations will accomplish a great 
deal. Secondly, he is convinced that the amount of income loss 
involved is not great. 

Code operations will hit a new high in activity in the coming 
year. New personnel will beef up the Washington and Hollywood 
offices and a new office will be opened in New York. Monitoring 
will be more extensive than ever and more emphasis will be placed 
on the (audio) taping of programing. 

The New York office will permit better liaison with the networks 
and throw code personnel into closer contact with advertisers and 
agencies (and vice versa). This latter kind of intimacy has been 
growing during the past year. Hartenbower attests as chairman of 
the Code's subcommittee on personal products that a published set 
of recommendations bearing on the proper presentation of such 
brands on the air received wide circulation among admen. 

Hartenbower has been with the Kansas City stations since 1944. 
Previously, he worked for the H. K. McCann Co. (predecessor of 
McCann-Erickson), NBC and ABC. ^ 



r\ 



€?) 



(Joe) Hartenbower 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



could have been "Editor in Chief "of WPTR 



Because he, too, aimed to be a vital force in the com- 
munity he served. The medium was different but the 
thinking was the same. As a broadcaster of news — 
itself — as a popular music station — but over and above 
all as a spokesman for the local populace in every worth- 
while project that furthers its needs, WPTR is GRASS 
ROOTS RADIO AT ITS BEST. 

Perhaps it's why WPTR has more local advertising than 



the next 3 stations combined; more total advertising 
dian the next 2 stations in the market put together. 

50,000 

PEOPLE WATTS 
ALBANY, TROY, SCHENECTADY 

The Dominant Station in the market according to Pulse. 
Right up there with Hooper, too. Represented nationally 
by Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. 




NCAN MOUNSEY EXEC. V. 
A division of SCHINE EN1 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



wmm i; 



m m 



>v 



SITES 
miNTY FOR AH 



16.8 A.M. 








In response to the demands o 
television viewers and sponsors 
for something fresh... something new. 

cnmftthin!* ahnvp, thfl nrdinarv 



SCREEN GEMS presents - 



An intriguing theme... an exciting new personality — 
as resourceful as Paladin, as formidable as Matt Dillon 
... in a setting full of the rugged action of a Western 
(still TV's most popular programming category*). 

39 Half Hour Films for Regional and Local Sponsorship 



For further details, contact: vj 



SCREEN W GEMS, inc. 

TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 
NEW YORK • DETROIT . CHICAGO • DALLAS . HOLLYWOOD . ATLANTA . TORONTO 




Sign of a 

Satisfied 

Advertiser 

on San Antonio's. 




ABC Television in San Antonio . . . 

the Greatest Unduplicated Live 

Coverage in South Texas! 

Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



- 



^ 



SPONSOR 



WITHIN A STONE'S THROW 
JP OF COMMUNICATIONS ROW! ^, j 

One of New York's 
most desirable locations 

MADISON AVENUE 
AT 52nd STREET 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 



Special Project* Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 



Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editor! 

Jack Lin 



Slori, 



F. Pilol 



Ben Seff 
Lloyd Kaplan 

Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 
Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 
Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 



Elai 



» Mai 



Helene Etelson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 

Eastern Office 

Bernard Piatt 

Willard Dougherty 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Western Manager 

George Dietrich 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg, Manager 

Bill Oefalain 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura Okan, Accounting Manager 

George Becker; Ann Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Gutman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Rora Temae'efli 




Just steps from anywhere... 
now with 500 individually deco- 
rated rooms and suites — and 
completely air conditioned. 




The magnificent new 



17 E. 52 St. 
Your rendezvous for dining 
deliberately and well . . . 
open every day of the week 
for luncheon, cocktails, 
dinner, supper. 



PLAZA 3-5800 • TWX: NY 1-138 




SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



Conversation at the Conrad Hilton 
(Suite #2200) 



"What's new at 
Adam Young?" 

"KRAK?" 



"Stockton- 
Sacramento" 

"How'd you guess?" 



"You're ideal for 

each other. Say, they 

have a great area 

story, don't they?" 



"When do you 
start?" 



"First on the latest 

Area Pulse. And 

going to 50,000 

watts on or before 

April 10, with new, 

fresh and exciting 

programming." 

"You mean when 
did we? April 1." 




ADAM YOUNG INC. 

Representing effective radio stations from eight key 



LOS ANGELES 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. 
los Angel*! 28, Colli. 
Hollywood 2-2189 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



i-ht key c 

DETROIT 

2940 Soolr l/dg. 
Detroit 25, Mich. 
WOodword 3-691 o 


enters: 

ATLANTi 


11 



Religion 

"Faith of Our Children" 

(Sundays, 1:30-2:00 pm) 

has won four consecutive 

Emmy Awards as 

the most outstanding 

children's program 

in Los Angeles. 

A warmly inspiring 

half-hour of 

Bible reading, prayer, 

pantomime skits 

and comedy sketches 

with religious themes, 

"Faith of Our Children" 

is known throughout 

Southern California 

as "TV's Sunday School." 

Choir direction 

and production 

is provided by 

visiting ministers, 

while the 

program's "teachers" 

have ranged over 

a multitude of Hollywood's 

most highly regarded 

leading ladies. 

Among them: 

Dale Evans, 

Anne Baxter, 

Gale Storm, 

Jeanette MacDonald 

and June Lockhart. 

Connie Haines currently 

fills the role, 

to the delight 

of children and adults. 




This is one of a 

broad range of programs 

designed to entertain, 

enlighten and inform 

KRCA's vast viewing public 

... to reach the few 

as well as the many 

... to provide something 

of interest for 

every television taste. 

KRCA 



and everything 



c^n between.. 



Relaxation 

"The Giroux Show" 

(Monday through Friday, 

4:40-6:00 pm) 

is sparked by versatile, 

personable Lee Giroux. 

A gifted interviewer, 

he constantly attracts 

top names from 

the entertainment 

and sports worlds 

to his program. 

Recent guests have included: 

Carl Sandburg, 

Sammy Davis, Jr., 

Lowell Thomas, 

Gene Krupa, 

Rosemary DeCamp 

and Carl Reiner. 

At the other end of 

the roster, 

some of his "off-beat" 

guests have included 

doubles of Eisenhower, 

De Gaulle and Khrushchev. 

The spontaneity of 

his live interviews 

is entertainingly balanced 

by two half-hour 

"Award Theatre" film dramas- 

and the sum total 

is thoroughly relaxing fare 

to end the busy 

householder's afternoon. 

Lee Giroux is 

strictly for fun, 

and a most welcome sight 

for Southern California viewers 




This is one of a 
broad range of programs 
designed to entertain, 
enlighten and inform 
KRCA's vast viewir 
to reach the many 
as w r ell as the few . . . 
to provide something 
of interest for 
every television 

KRCA 

NBC Owned 

Channel 4 in Los Angeles 



Don't bury your head 





NEGRO 
RADIO 



An Ostrich with a buried head misses 
many things that are most obvious. If you 
haven't discovered Rounsaville Radio 's six 
Negro Markets you are overlooking an 
824 million dollar consumer group. That's 
what Negroes in the Ro_r-s^. Ille Rad^o 
area have ready to spend AFTER taxes! 
80°^ of their money is spent on consumer 
items alone. Incomes are up 192"^ since 
World War II! To make sure you're get- 
ting your share of nearly one billion dol- 
lars, use Rounsa\ille Radio ! All six 
Rounsaville Radio stations are Number- 
One Rated by BOTH Pulse and Hooper. 
Call Rounsaville Radio in Atlanta. John 
E. Pearson, or Dora-Clayton in the South- 
east today! 



Personal Letter 

An Advertiser's dream is a 
captive audience pre-condi- 
tioned to buy his product. 
The nearest thing to this is 
Rounsaville Radio — 1 00 ' 
programmed to the Negro 
audience. Negro performers tell your sales 
story to their Negro listeners, and believe me, 
they buy! A proper part of your budget must 
go to Rounsaville Radio or you miss this market! 
We are one of the oldest and largest broad- 




casters in Negro Radio. 



HAROLD F. 



FIRST U. S. NEGRO-PROGRAMMED CHAIN 
FIRST IN RATING IN SIX BIG MARKETS 

WCIN 1,000 Watts (5,000 Watts soon)-Cin- 

cinnati's only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

WLOU 5.000 Watts - Louisville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WMBM 5.000 Warts-Miami-Miami Beach's 

only full time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WVOL 5.000 Watts - Nashville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WYLD 1,000 Watts— New Orleans' only full 

time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WTMP 5.000 Watts— Tampa-St. Petersburg's 

only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

BUY ONE OR ALL WITH GROUP DISCOUNTS! 



ROUNSAVILLE 

RADIO STATIONS 

PEACHTREE AT MATHIESON. ATLANTA 5. GEORGIA 
ROBERT W ROUNSAVILLE HAROI 
JOHN E PEARSON CO. DO 




by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 



m bright 

I 



Convention outlook: far from bright 

It is easy to predict that this year's convention 
of the National Association of Broadcasters up- 
coming at Chicago's Conrad Hilton Hotel 3 
through 6 April will he a grim one. I This is 
being written 12 days bef ore. i The 1,000 ok 
more broadcasters in attendance will he keenly 
aware that the horrendous pace of the sound 
and sight communications business killed their 
association leader on the afternoon of 8 March. 

They will know that Harold Fellows should have slowed down 
years ago. and could not. Many of them, if not alL inevitably will 
translate this into the direct, personal conviction that thev. too. 
should slow down. And most of them, if not all. will realize that 
like Hal Fellows, they cannot. 

Thev cannot for the same, simple reason that Hal Fellows could 
not. Never in its history has the broadcasting business been in 
greater jeopardy on more levels than at present. Never has the in- 
dustry needed the full, dedicated effort of its best men as it does 
today. And. even as in the case of Hal Fellows, if it costs some of 
them their very lives, the industrv will get this all-out service from 
its leaders. I have had the privilege of observing and working with 
many men in a number of industries, and I say unequivocally, that 
I know of no men in anv other industry, as dedicated to their busi- 
ness' welfare as broadcasters. 

To dramatize — if any dramatization were needed — one phase of 
the industry's crisis, the chairman of the Federal Communications 
Commission John Doerfer. of course, was forced to resign his post in 
the very same week that a heart attack destroyed Hal Fellows. It 
is not the intention, here, to discuss the Doerfer case except to say 
that in Chairman Doerfer the industry was dealing with an FCC 
chairman who was outspoken in his belief in the freedom of broad- 
casting, and in his opposition to program censorship by the Govern- 
ment or any other body. 

Frederick Ford, the new chairman, in the statement he made when 
he was appointed to the job. said: ". . . There are more problems 
facing the Commission today than at any other time in history. The 
problems at times seem insoluble. The Commission, however, is 
composed of dedicated . . . qualified men. who will continue to apply 
their long experience, knowledge and ability to the solution of these 
problem- 

Dedicated ye*, but pretty muddled 

I do not doubt the dedication and the experience, knowledge and 
ability of the Commissioners. But one of the Commission's earliest 
pronouncements, that dealing with stringent and totally technical 

sponsor • 2 APRIL 1960 



enforcement of Section 317 of the Communication? Act. really baffles 
me. 

Is it possible that each time a station plays a phonograph record, 
an announcement will have to be made that the record was given 
to the station free by the Acme Distributing Corporation, or the 
Jones Music Publishing Company, or Sam Fleet, a record exploita- 
tion man working independently for Kitty Gurgle, the singer on the 
record? Is it possible that when a station plays a band from an 
LP, which it received as a subscriber to a record company LP 
service, the station will have to announce: "We received this LP 
at a nominal price as subscribers to the Superb Record Company 
LP subscription service'"? Or will one blanket pre-show or post- 
show announcement, as used to be the case with transcribed pro- 
grams, suffice? 

No responsible broadcaster could possibly object to strict enforce- 
ment of the Communications Act. As a matter of fact most of my 
broadcaster friends have been hoping for many months that specific 
clarification of all foggy sections of the Act would be forthcoming. 
Perhaps Chairman Ford will address the broadcasters at the 3 April 
Convention and shed light on this and many other matters of far 
greater importance. Industry leaders, I'm certain, will be hoping 
that Chairman Ford will find some way of shedding light on his, 
and the Commission's position on the FCC responsibility in the 
programing area. 

Cannot compromise with censorship! 

On the very evening of the day, Thursday, 10 March. John Doer- 
fer turned in his resignation in Washington, General David Sarnoff, 
chairman of the board of the Radio Corporation of America, at the 
20th Anniversary dinner of the Radio and Television Executives' 
Society in New York, told the guests that the one error broadcasting 
could not afford to make was to submit to government censorship 
of programing. 

One of the primary demands of the day. said the general, was to 
resist any direct or disguised censorship, and to defend the freedom 
of broadcast communications, hard won over a period of many 
decades. The general said there is no such thing as a "little" 
censorship. Either you have censorship, said he, or you don't. 

Veteran broadcaster needed 

If no new head of the National Association of Broadcasters is 
appointed by convention time, the conclave will, of course, be rife 
with speculation as to who Hal Fellows' successor will be. One 
school of thought, at the moment, is urging that a non-broadcaster 
person of stature be appointed. Another school is in favor of one of 
several veteran broadcasters. With all due respect to Hal's prede- 
cessor, Judge Justin Miller and his forerunner, Neville Miller, both 
non-broadcasters, I'm all for having a top broadcaster in the job. 
Bob Swezey and Joe Ream are two of those who have been sug- 
gested, and I believe either would do a tremendous job. The 
industry would be lucky to get one of them. 

I'm looking forward to seeing them and the other members of the 
14-man group of us who went to Europe in 1945, at our annual 
reunion. The convention, as I said, will be a grim one, but getting 
with my old colleagues once again will brighten it somewhat, if 
only for a few^ hours. 

And I want to say how happy and proud I am that sponsor is 
dedicating this convention issue to Hal Fellows. It's one more nice 
tribute to a fine man. ^ 

SPONSOR • 2 ATRIL 1960 




C-0-M-M-A-N-P-l-N- 
L-E-A-D-E-R-S-H-l-P 
on all viewing fronts! 

WREX-TV continues to 
dominate Rockford and 
Area Viewing . . . 

• AT NIGHT 

45 of the Top 50 Shows . . . 

• IN THE DAYTIME 

All 20 of the Top 20 Shows 

• TOP WESTERNS 

7 of the Top 8 Shows 

• TOP FAMILY SHOWS 

5 of the Top 5 Shows 

• TOP SPORTS, 
SYNDICATED FILM, 
MOVIES, 
PUBLIC SERVICE. 

♦Source ARB Ocf. 25 - Nov. 21, 1959 

IN FACT ... All Day and 
All Night! . . . Every Hour 
of the Week is "Good 
Time" on . . . WREX-TV 



WREX?TV 

n n e 1 ? 3 




delivers the 

largest audience 

in Washington 




For the past two years, WRC-TV's average share-of-audience (ARB) has be 
the Washington area. The range and quality of WRC-TV programming is respo^~ 
impressive record — a record of audience delivery that makes WRC-TV the mos: 
advertising buy in its 57-county coverage area! Is this special delivery • : you? 

NBC owned-channel 4 in Washington. sold' by NBC spot sales ^A7 r "l^#'*-"^"^\7 r 




WPIX-11 carries more minute advertising from 
the top 25 national spot advertisers than any 
other New York television station.* ■ Leading 
advertisers select wpix-11 for the "network 
look" of its programming, its Nielsen 
proved quality audience and the guar 
an teed good company of other national 
advertisers. Your product message 
will never appear with "mail order" or 




over-long commercials -because wpix-11 does not 
accept this kind of advertising ■ Only wpix-11, 
of all seven New York TV stations, offers you so 
many opportunities to place minute commer- 
cials in such a productive selling atmos- 
phere during the prime nighttime hours! 

Jf here are your 60-second commercials tonight? 



WIPE 



new 
york 



STONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



2 APRIL I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth (or busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



The fall selling situation at CBS TV and NBC TV can be compared to a storekeep- 
er so immersed in seeing that his displays are just right that he's oblivious of the customers 
clamoring out front to get in and spend their money. 

In other words, these two networks are having a hard time getting their sched- 
ules on track and the agencies a still harder time trying to explain to their clients 
they can't give them even an inkling of what's in store for them showwise come next season. 

The networks' explanation: (1) they're waiting for lots of slow-arriving pilots be- 
fore freezing the schedule; (2) they want to avoid the chaotic business of in-and-out- 
again slotting of both programs and orders; they'd prefer to see what's pitted against them 
on the opposition networks. (The Hollywood strike hasn't helped.) 

Meanwhile agencies are hearing this plaint from NBC salesmen : We can't tell you 
anything yet; the program department's taken over and all we can do is wait. 

But back at the ABC TV ranch the die is pretty well cast. Witness that Wednesday 
7:30-8:30 sale of Hong Kong to Kaiser, plus continuation of at least half of Maverick. 



If the odds are long enough, you can get a bet on Madison Avenue that the Pepsi-Cola 
account (estimated at $13-15 million) will go to a dark-horse agency. 

One dark-horse frequently mentioned is Norman-Craig-Kummel, which last year billed 
altogether about $30 million. 

Buying activity in national spot tv the past week was rather skimpy, hut con- 
sistent with the traditional slide-off for this time of the year. 

Among the activists: Lever's Lipton tea (SSCB) ; Duncan Hines' deluxe angel food 
cake (Compton) ; Carter's Pills (Bates) ; Bufferin (Y&R) ; Brown & Williamson's Kentucky 
King cigarettes (Bates). 

A particularly extensive buyer of spot radio this week: Bristol-Myers' Trig (BBDO). 



Behind the Purex Co.'s S3-million buy on NBC TV is this bit of strategy: if you 
can't compete in ad dollars with your giant competitors try to look bigger than yon 

are by aligning yourself with multiples of big things like daytime and nighttime specials. 

The Purex tv spectrum, as mapped out by Edward H. Weiss: participation in seven 
daytime specials, a like number of nighttime specials and 26 daytime quarter-hours 
over 52 weeks. (Offbeat note: a customer finally for NBC's daytime specials.) 



What has suddenly become a dubious, if not dangerous, area of advertising: the dry 
dog foods. 

The vet« are raising demurrers about the artificial coloring of certain brands. 



In light of what the Reader's Digest (JWT) has to say about the medium in 
the same issue under the heading of Must Tv Bring the Bathroom into the Living Room?, 
there's sardonic flavor in this: 

A major stations group this week put a for-adults-only restriction on the spot tv 

blurb for the Digest article. Too Tired to Love. 

In other words, the commercial must be aired after 11 p.m. 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



19 



Sponsor-scope <»*&*»* 



Chalk this up as another instance of what can happen in the confusion over na- 
tional vs. local rates in radio. 

BBDO was in the process the past week of drumming up availabilities for Gallo wine. 
At the same time stations in the east were getting calls from the advertiser on the West 
Coast about placing schedules at local rates. 

Robert E. Eastman & Co. has moved into tv representation on hoth a group 
and individual basis via a separate sales organization. Eastman TV. 

The Eastman thesis, in a nutshell: 

' 1 | Since spot tv buying today is limited to the top 50 markets, it's necessary that the sta- 
tions in the smaller markets get to the decision-maker with a group proposition that 
would offer added coverage at low wholesale CPM. 

YA ith this door opened. Eastman TV could ferret out at the same time specific sales 
problems and suggest individual station buys to cover these needs. 

Buyers of national spot tv may find themselves in an exceptionally tight mar- 
ket this fall because, in addition to those heavy toy campaigns, there'll be politics. 

Never before have these two sources of saturation met in the medium. 
What can be expected: gift advertisers moving into the medium in August in 
larger droves so as to be sure thev"re solidlv intrenched during October. 

The average tv home devoted 17 hours and 17 minutes to the batch of 81 network 
specials telecast between September and 31 Januarv this season. 

On the basis of 45.200.000 homes. Nielsen estimates that this is equivalent to 1.7 billion 
viewer hours, or about 500 million people seeing two Broadwav shows each. 

To avoid inequitable distribution of its spots in say. a 12-plan buy. Compton 
has submitted to tv stations what it deems a reasonable and realistic system for late 
evening participations. 

The gist of the plan: 1 1 1 everybodv on a show using a rotation system be given identi- 
cal message placement, regardless of tenure; i2i no freezing of anybody for a 
prolonged period in either the first or latter half: i 3 t every advertiser gets maximum 
audience weight in as short a time as possible — that is. two weeks. 

Compton figures that there's flexibility in its system, which is particularly necessary be- 
cause of competitive problems. Also that the position of any one advertiser in any one 
week is unimportant, providing in the following week he's so spotted that the average 
ratings over two weeks is equivalent to the program's average rating. 

Here's an example of how Compton would schedule advertisers A. B & C: 

Commercial Position Approximate Positioning in successive weeks 

Position Rating Time 1 II III IV V VI 

#1 12.0 11:15 p.m. A — C — — — 

#2 12.0 11:35 p.m. — — A — C — 

#3 11.6 11:35 p.m. — — — — A — 

= 1 11.2 11:55 p.m. B _____ 

10.8 11:55 p.m. — — B — — — 

#6 10.4 12:15 a.m. C — — — B — 

-7 10.0 12:15 a.m. — C — — — B 

#8 9.6 12:35 a.m. — — — B — — 

#9 9.2 12.35 a.m. — B — — — — 

#10 8.8 12:55 a.m. — — — — — A 

#11 8.4 12:55 a.m. — — — A — C 

= 12 8.4 1:10 a.m. — A — C — — 
Average rating: 10.2 



SPONSOR-SCOPE consumed 



NBC TV has apparently drawn a sales policy distinction between one class of 
nighttime spot carrier and another for the fall. 

Buyers of Laramie and Bonanza will have to enter into IS- or 26-week contracts 
if 20-minute segments are involved and the two allowable commercial minutes will have 
to be used each week. 

In the instance of other spot carriers, such two minutes may be spread over two weeks 
and the term of obligation will be catch-as-catch-can. 

Because of the promotion's success last year, Alcoa is repeating its weekend buys 
(10 spots weekly for 10 weeks) on Monitor this spring and next fall. 

NBC Radio affiliates again can garner added revenue by selling adjacent spots to 
local builders, architects and suppliers. 

Confidence seems to be on the rise among the top rank agencies that CBS TV will 
water down its new rules on commercial positioning before the fall. 

The greatest resentment can be found among the creative fraternity. Echoing the theme 
of a recent Frank Stanton speech attacking programing control, the creative gentry holds that 
CBS' attitude toward commercials strikes at the very heart of the freedom of agen- 
cies and advertisers. 

They warn that the strictures can hurt the sponsorship of public affairs programs, since 
the rules, if enforced, can tend to weaken the advertiser's message. 

The uncommonly rough weather across the country in March proved somewhat 
of a boon to average sets-in-use: it was up over March 1959 and specifically 6% over 
this February. 

Average sets-in-use at night for the past two months as measured by Trendex: 
month 1960 1959 

February 56.2 59.1 

March 59.5 59.1 

Looks like the Peter Lind Hayes series, one of P&G's new starters for the fall, will 
wind up on NBC TV. 

The other, Lincoln Jones and the Law, will likely find a berth on ABC TV. 

The Hayes show was sold at $51,000 net for originals and half that for repeats, 
while Jones came in at $48,000 net for originals. 

P.S. : CBS TV is reported to have passed up P&G's offer of the Hayes show. 



NBC TV's big gift package for affiliates at the NAB meeting: four one-minute 
spots in prime evening time for spot sale during the 1960-61 season. 

Where these spots are to be will be determined after the network has frozen its fall night- 
time schedule. 

CBS TV has yet to decide what it will do for its affiliates in a similar vein. 



Look for Alcoa to put its tv emphasis next season on tv specials, spending 
around $3 million for 10 of them out of the Talent Associates shop. 

It'll also break away from the Goodyear alternate arrangement and sponsor. IS 
addition to the specials, an alternate half-hour or hour show. 

Even then Alcoa will be running behind Kaiser's commitment in tv 
a weekly hour and alternate half-hour, which, at list prices, would come to around 
lion, time and programs. 



dollars for 
S 1 1 - 1 2 mil- 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL I960 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



From the viewpoint of selling strategy nothing in air media is as volatile as day- 
time network tv. 

Take the latest philosophy current at CBS TV: daytime has become strictly a mat- 
ter of pricing, with the buyer far less concerned with programing than how he 
comes out on the end discount. 

However. CBS seems determined to sell daytime strictly in quarter-hour units 
with the buyer required to use two minutes of his commercial time in each quarter-hour as 
contrasted with ABC'c policy of permitting the advertiser to scatter his commercial min- 
utes any way he elects. 

An example of CBS' adamant attitude: it turned down an offer of a five-minute 
weekdav strip on a program that's still wide open. 

The burgeoning personnel turnover in the big agencies — management's No. 1 
headache — keeps pushing the cost of supervisory people into higher and higher 
brackets. 

Account supervisors range between $30-45,000 and the salaries of crack media 
group heads is not very far under this range. 

To put it gently, a high grade media supervisor these days is considered pretty much 
on a monev par with a heavvweight account executive. 

The competition in tv programing qualitative research keeps getting hotter : Trendex is 
introducing a new variation in its continuing audience measurement service this 
fall. 

The plan: It will ask 200-300 reached during a polling period what they liked about a 
show thev said thev were watching. In three or four weeks those who responded fa- 
vorably will be called again and asked whether they still tuned in that program. 

Should the answer be in the negative, the prober will try to find out if it was because 
they found the show no longer to their liking and why. 

The objective: To arrive at the basic reasons why a program is holding or losing 
its audience. 

If you're a buyer of participations in late-night feature films, you may get an 
insight into audience trends from this Nielsen comparison of ratings and (shares) : 
market 1959-60 1958-59 1957-58 

New York (Jan.) 10.6 (33) 13.5 (40) 14.4 (42) 

Los Angeles (Dec.) 4.1 (24) 6.2 (25) 3.6 (21) 

Chicago (Jan. i 9.6*(24*) 8.4(20) 7.0(23) 

*Moved to earlier time in '59-60. 

Beer and beverages ran away with the field as the eight "most effective" radio 
commercials of 1959 were honored Thursday at RAB's National Radio Advertising Clinic. 

The winners in alphabetical order are Budweiser (D'Arcy), Coca-Cola (McCann-Erick- 
son), Ford (JWT), Nescafe (Esty), Northwest Orient (Campbell-Mithun), Pepsi-Cola (K&E), 
Schlitz (JWT), Winston (Esty). 

Selection of the winners was bv a 300-man ad panel. 

DuPont (BBDO) solved its specials problem for next season when CBS TV 
this week agreed to take a maximum of eight of them — the client had figured on 

10. CBS also gave DuPont the Friday 10:30-11 p.m. slot for the June Allyson series. 
Remaining entertainment specials that CBS will take: 14. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 55; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 110; Washington Week, page 105; 
sponsor Hears, page 108; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 120; and Film-Scope, page 106. 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 




WFLA-TV sole: 



Fig, 



Everyone is selling more of everything in the Land of Profitunity! 
And with good reason! In the big eight years, 1950-1958, population in 
this 26-county market is up 61%; retail sales have rocketed 131% and food 
sales an amazing 146%! 

Get your share of this great profit opportunity — spot your service 
or product on WFLA-TV — dominant in the Land of Profitunity! 

For all the facts, write us today. 

s from Sales Management 1959 Survey of Buying Pinter. ^M^^^S^^L 

taiuipa.qtpptfrsburg ^^^^^^^^W 

aaaHa ggg^jjjjj| NAT! 



PCS 

|^^^ T A M 



TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 



NATIONAL RE'RE.t 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 




mim 



HODGES 
WILLIE 



MAW? 



me 

I 



ou'll see when the top 
home run hitters of today 
meet in direct competition. 






GRABBED BY: CONSOLIDATED CIGAR in Green Bay. Milwaukee. Rockford 
and other midwest markets. SCHLITZ BEER in Albany, Ga.. INTERNATIONAL 
HARVESTER CO., in Savannah, Greenbay, Tampa-St. Petersburg, STAGGS BILT 
HOMES in Phoenix. JOHN LABATT. LTD., OF CANADA in Buffalo, Rochester, 
Erie, Watertown . . and many others! 

SNAPPED UP BY: WALE-TV, Albany, Ga., WBAL-TV, Baltimore, WLW-T, Cin 
cinnati, WSAZ-TV, Huntington-Charleston. WLW-C, Columbus, O., WLW-D, Day- 
ton. WLW-I, Indianapolis. KPLC-TV, Lake Charles. WCCO-TV, Minneapoli 
WAVY-TV. Norfolk, WJAR-TV, Providence, WROC-TV, Rochester, WDAU-TV, 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, WSJV-TV, South Bend-Elkhart. WICS-TV, Springfield, III. 
KFSD-TV, San Diego, WEEK-TV, Peoria, KLIX-TV, Idaho Falls, WLUC-TV, Mar 
quette, Mich., WAGA -TV, Atlanta, KTVE, El Dorado-Monroe, La., WSVA-TV, Har 
risonburg. Va.. WJAC-TV, Johnstown. Pa., WLOF-TV, Orlando. KETV, Omaha, 
WTVW, Evansville. KTVH, Wichita-Hutchinson-Great Bend. KTVE, Ft. Smith, 
Ark.. WTVY, Tampa St. Petersburg, WREX-TV, Rockford, III., WTIC-TV, Hartford. 
WRVA-TV, Richmond ... and many othersl 





HAB«- VISIT 



Suite 2300 
Hotel Conrad 
Hilton, Chicago 




Now Baseball's Greatest 



Ball" Sluggers 



AT FOR YOU! 



jr jvuC&y MANTLE • HANK AARON 
^^FRANKIE ROBINSON • KEN EWER 




ROW C01AVIT0 • DUKE SNIDER 
60S TRIANDOS • EDDIE MATHEWS 

and many others star in 
THE BIG AUDIENCE-WINNER OF 1960 

HOME RUN 
DERBY'' 

ALL THE EXCITEMENT OF BASEBALL'S BIGGEST MOMENT! 



The new power 
in TV programs 




ZIV-UNITED ARTISTS INC. 
488 Madison Ave.. New York 22, N. Y. 




REPRESENTED BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 

WCAU. Philadelphia: ECBS. San Francisco; ENX. Los Angeles; 
IBM. Chicago; KMOX. St. Louis 



.V 



49th and 
Madison 



■wi 



Our fm leaders 

In view of your continuing interest in 
fm, I think the following will interest 
your readers. 

According to a survey conducted 
n behalf of radio station WFLM in 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, one-third 
of all homes in Broward County have 
fm radio reception available. Brow- 
rd County comprises Fort Lauder- 
dale, Hollywood and Pompano Beach 
and this survey indicates a signifi- 
cant growth in fm listenership. In 
August of 1958 the fm penetration 
was only 20%. Other facts brought 
in the survey include: homes 
with children have a higher incidence 
of fm radio ownership than childless 
homes . . . homes which have one or 
more occupants at work show a high- 
saturation than do retirement 
homes . . . and over half of all fm 
radio sets in Broward County are lo- 
cated in homes where the breadwin- 
ner is a supervisor, proprietor, or 
member of a profession. 

Robert A. Hinners 

station mgr. 

WFLM 

Fort Lauderdale 



I hope you will be interested in our 
fm promotion which we started un- 
der the prodding of the Sarkes- 
Tarzian ad in sponsor and the NAB 
publication FM-Emphasis. 

Warren is a town of 15,000 popu- 
lation. WNAE is a daytimer and 
WRNN is our means of full-time cov- 
erage via fm. WRRN has been broad- 
casting a full day's schedule since 
1948. Everything of importance in 
Warren is broadcast on WRRN. Over 
52.5% of Warren homes have fm, 
but in spite of the relatively high set 
wnership. WRRN usually loses mon- 
y. Our aim in this campaign is to 
make every home an fm home. 

In the last three weeks 4,100 peo- 
ple have written us cards stating "I 
Want an fm Radio."' To satisfy this 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



demand we bought 200 Sarkes-Tarz- 
ian fm radios and have placed them 
on consignment at cost with 16 deal- 
ers. They began to sell the first day 
— even before our advertising began. 
We thought you'd like to see a copy 
of our five-point fm promotion. 

David Potter 
general mar. 
WRRN 
Warren, Pa. 

Excellent treatment 

I have just had an occasion to 
read the 5 March issue of your 
very excellent magazine sponsor. 
The excellent way in which you 
handled our client's story I Gamble 
Stores) on their big, special promo- 
tion is very gratifying, to say the 
least, and for this we want to thank 
you and tell you how much we ap- 
preciate your efforts. I think that 
television history was really made 
with this project and the way you 
handled it will certainly help tell the 
trade about this historic move. 

One thing that we might have 
missed up on in this story and that 
might warrant a mention in an up- 
coming issue of sponsor is the tre- 
mendous job that WCCO-TV did in 
setting up the entire stage for this 
project. Without the cooperation of 
WCCO-TV — particularly Sherm 
Headley, assistant manager of the 
station — the entire project would not 
have been possible. He performed 
yeoman service in getting things done 
that were otherwise thought to be 
impossible. 

John M. Lamb 

BBDO 

Minneapolis 



WNJR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



KJEO-TV 

Central California's 
# 1 Prime Time Station 
with proof from the 
viewers themselves:* 

Channel 

47 

■ Fresno 



*ALLf DAYS 
A WEEK 

DELIVERS MORE 

VIEWER HOMES 

FROM 6 to 10 P.M.! 

(Source: Current ARB with 34.8 Rating) 
Yet KJEO-TV rates are 
right with the lowest in 
the area. See your H-R 
Representative early for 
your best prime time buys. 



channel ^^ M 

Fresno, Call 

J.E. O'Neill — President 
Joe Drilling — Vice Pi 

and G 
W.O. Edholm-C< : B« 

See your I H'Rdtf 





TO CALL 

POLSCE 

" C *THIS 

PHONE 



m 




The story broke early in January with 
indications of blatant corruption in 
the Chicago Police Department. First 
to be undone: a group of patrolmen 
. accused of sponsoring their own thief. 
Expose followed expose, flushing 
dishonest policemen and irresponsible 
higher-ups. All newspapers and radio 
and television stations in Chicago 
duly reported these developments. 

WNBQ Television and WMAQ Radio, 
Chicago's NBC stations, went further. 
Shortly after the first shocking discovery, 
the stations' "City Desk" programs 
devoted their full energies to a 
penetrating examination of the scandal's 
cause and effect. Every week since, 
these Sunday programs have continued 
the search by interviewing law 
enforcement authorities and persons 
directly concerned with the issues. 

"Shadow On Our City," a WNBQ 
documentary series, scheduled in prime 
time, focused on the political use the 
scandal has been put to and developed 
some stunning revelations and startling 
conclusions. Regular newscasts 
continued to provide valuable insight 
that helped Chicago's citizens take 
intelligent action to meet the situation. 

The Chicago Daily News' appraisal of 
these efforts typifies critical response : 
"WNBQ has put its TV competition to 
shame with its special coverage of the 
police scandal. WNBQ has performed 
a vital, responsible public service." 

Chicagoans now can look forward to a 
completely reorganized police department . . 
and a happier, healthier community. 
And WNBQ and WMAQ can look with pride 
upon a bright new chapter in a long 
history of public service programming. 

WNBQ/WMAQ 

CHANNEL 5 ^' 670 ON THE DIAL^ 

NBC OWNED STATIONS IN CHICAGO 



WPTF Delivers 

$/ 2 BILLION 

FOOD Market 




SALES Only eleven metropolitan 
markets exceed the WPTF area food 
sales of S54l,043,000. 

POPULATION 3,179,000 

DISTRIBUTION A & P, Colonial 
Stores, Winn-Dixie, and Piggly 
Wiggly serve 215 supermarkets 
from their Raleigh warehouses. Also 
...12 major wholesalers, 17 food 
brokers, reps of most major food 
manufacturers, and warehouses or 
processing plants for Swift, Armour, 
Wilson, Kraft Foods, Jesse Jones, 
Continental Baking, Ward Baking, 
American Bakeries ... all located in 
Raleigh. 

AD COVERAGE WPTF is the only 
single medium that reaches all of 
this food market. Over 50% of the 
homes listen to WPTF (NCS#2) 




50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC AMKbfe lor Pale'.gh-Durhom 

and EoHem North Corolino 

R. H. Mason, General Manager 

Gus Youngsteadt, Sales Manager 




Timebuyers 
at work 



Nick Imbornone, McCann-Erickson Advertising U.S.A.. New York 
feels that representatives can help buying in a few respects: 1 I Ap 
pointments. "I don't understand what some reps have against mak 
ing appointments. It would save them a half hour in the waiting 
room, and help the buyer better organize and plan his da\ ." 2 
Visiting Fireman. "We welcome 
station men, but want specific in- 
formation from them that'll help 
us better understand the market 
and the station. Many drop by 
with reps to say 'hello' and are 
totally unprepared with anything 
new." 3 1 Getting down to busi- 
ness. "Most rep salesmen have 
great personalities and I have 
nothing against small-talk and a 
joke or two — but in the midst of 
a hectic schedule, time is of the 
essence." 4i Basic Information. "Some reps run to extremes. Eithe: 
they come in with little or no information, or dump elaborate folder- 
on your desk that would take weeks to go through. There's a happn 
medium — valid research findings, simply presented, and not obscured 
by puff promotion." 



Marie Coleman, Donahue & Coe, Inc.. New York, points out tha 
while most buvers are strongly against rate-cutting because of th< 
unfair advantage which may be gained by overly hard-driving 
agencies, it is the discounting station that ultimately suffers. '"Ono 
a station undersells, it's almost impossible for it to resume forme 
standards. It's like a runaway in 
flation — w here it stops no on< 
knows." For one thing. Mari> 
says, it cuts down the dollar vol 
ume of the station. Second of all 
and most important, its an admis 
sion that the facility is not word 
the going rate. "Beyond that 
there's the tacit implication tha 
all of the previous advertisers, wb 
paid card rate, had overpaid anc 
were therefore cheated. And mak' 1 
no mistake, other advertisers will 
find out about it. they always do. This is a business with no secrets 
In some industries rate-cutting is either accepted or countenanced 
but in broadcasting, where stations sell an intangible, integritv i- 
an essential element of good business." 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 196( 





MORE "NATIVE" MERCHANTS BEAT THE DRUM ON 
W-l-T-H THAN ANY OTHER BALTIMORE RADIO STATION! 

WJTH is First in Baltimore with more local advertisers than any other 
station. Can you find better proof of a station's effectiveness than the day-in, 
year-out confidence of the local businessmen who expect their cash registers 
to record every commercial? Follow the lead of the local advertisers ... men 
who really know the market : buy WITH and Baltimore buys you ! 

_ RADIO 

oWITH 

PERSONALITY s „» ffl0r . 

bm Tinsley, President; R. C. Embry, Vice President; national representatives: select station representatives in New York, Baltimore, 
Washington and Philadelphia; adam young in Boston, Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, 
'leveland, Pittsburgh and Seattle; clarke brown company in the South and Southwest. 

PONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 31 



*!!♦• 



Nttipj^r A 



'ftp 



THE MOST 

of any Boston TV station 




NEWSCASTS 

\nd look at these other facts about WBZ-TV! ■ Most local air personalities — more 
lan any other Boston TV station. ■ Most national advertisers of any Boston TV 
|;ation — 193 compared to 148 for the second-place station. ■ Public service program- 
Ling — 234 hours and 12,667 spot announcements contributed last year to 203 charitable 
jrojects. ■ Largest TV share of audience.* ■ Most awards of all Boston TV stations. 

fiaVs why in Boston, no TV spot campaign is complete without the WBC station 

WBZ-TV 

1 BOSTON 



^presented by Television Advertising Representatives, Inc. 
ji^f^CchwESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 




( Just a matter of Relativity) 

• WBTV-Charlotte is FIRST TV Market in Entir 
Southeast with 595,200 TV Homes* 

• WBTV Delivers 43% More Television Homes ths 
Charlotte Station "B"** 



on Magazine— January 1960 



*NCS =3 



LETS COMPARE MARKETS! 



WBTV-CHARLOTTE 


595,200 


ATLANTA 


571, SCO 


MEMPHIS 


483,800 


LOUISVILLE 


459,000 


MIAMI 


434,900 


BIRMINGHAM 


425. 100 


NEW ORLEANS 


381.900 


NASHVILLE 


344,400 


NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH 


339,700 


RICHMOND 


2 71, OOO 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPAM 

WBTV, 

CHANNEL 3 ® CHARLOTTE; 



^ SPONSOR 



2 APRIL 1960 



TV PROGRAM CONTROL- 
WHERE IS IT HEADED? 

# Right now the trend is toward tighter network con- 
trol but some admen expect agencies and clients will ask 
for a lot of it back after skies clear again in Washington 



I hat old football known as "tv show control" has hobbled 
oose again, only the players can't quite decide who should pick 
,t up and run with it. Some agencies feel inclined to carry it, if 
jtor no other reason than to impress their paying clients. Others 
■vould gladly pass it to the networks, at least until things cool off 
,>n Capitol Hill. The networks appear ready to take the pass 
iince it gives them a tactical advantage in strengthening pro- 
gram line-ups, but at the same time they can't quite trust those 
| eferees from Washington who threaten to get into the game 
If hemselves. 
j What further compounds the confusion is that there is some- 
jhing semantically wrong with the word "control." It has been 

IsPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



HOW NETWORKS 
CURRENTLY STAND 
ON SHOW CONTROL 



A DP Except for Rifle- 

rtUw man which is li- 
censed to P&G, this network 
has all its other night net tv 
programs licensed to itself 
(999? control, according to 
ABC). Net feels this gives 
tactical advantage in being 
able to move shows around 
for strong blocks, and at 
same time eliminate danger 
of an agency or client mov- 
a show to another network. 



PPQ Here, 11 evening 
vllv shows are wholly 
owned by the network: Small 
World, Twentieth Century, 
Ed Sullivan, Dennis O'Keefe, 
Red Skelton, The Millionaire. 
Rawhide, Person to Person, 
Hotel de Paree, Gunsmoke 
and Have Gun. Owned 
jointly by CBS and producers 
are: Garry Moore. Jack 
Benny, I've Got a Secret, 
Twilight Zone, Perry Mason. 



ynO Three shows in 
91 Dv the nighttime 

line-up here are wholly con- 
troled by the network. They 
are: Bonanza. World Wide 
60 and Sunday Showcase. 
These are developed and pro- 
duced entirely by NBC per- 
sonnel. 10 others are "par- 
tially con troled" — that is, 
produced in outside studios 
but with full script and cast- 
ing control held b 



kicked around so long — ever since 
the heydaj <>f radio — that todaj it 
mean- main things to many people. 

"This thing they call 'program 
control,' " an adman told sponsor, 
"might better be called 'degree of 
influence.' " 

An agency, for example, may "con- 
trol" a tv show, but the network con- 
tinuity department has the say on 
whether they'll air it or not. On the 
other hand, a network may "control" 
a show, but if the sponsor objects to 
it be may force a change in script or 
even stay off the show. (This was the 
case recently when client 7-Up passed 
up sponsoring one episode of ABC 
TV's The Untouchables to which it 
objected). 

But the word in the news is "con- 
trol." So here is the outlook for it. 

• The drift is toward less control 
by clients/agencies and more control 
by networks. 

Reasons for this are obvious. 
Fewer clients are able to sponsor 
programs all by themselves due large- 
ly to costs that have rocketed far be- 
yond old network radio days when 
agencies moved in to show control. 

With co-sponsorships, it is getting 



WITH THESE THREE SHOWS THE AGENCY IS 




; 



SUNDAY SHOWCASE: NBC TV 

produced entirely by NBC personnel. Ab> 



increasingly hard to match up alter- 
nate sponsors within the same agen- 
cies. Here is where you run into such 
problems as a show controled by the 
"agency of record," which is respon- 
sible for a show it controls and the 





agency of the alternate sponsor wh 
buys into the show. 

Then there is the trend towar 
longer shows — an hour or more- 
developed and produced by networl 
which are sold in the multiple-spoi| 
sorship market. Besides this, fel 
agencies are equipped to develo 
shows, even in conjunction with fret 
lance producers, that are better thai 
the shows the networks produce- 
are even acceptable at the net. 

An example of this trend is AB 
TV which, in the upcoming 1960-C 
season, admits to being 99% in co 
trol of its full night line-up and, ha] 
ing licensed to itself every single pr 
gram except The Rifleman which F 
licensed to P&G. There are son! 
agency people who find flaws in thl 
tally; they refuse to believe thl 
some "degree of influence" on thel 
"controled" properties is not extl 
cised by the agencies and advertisel 
who buy them. "They haven't A 
surrendered such fringe control l 
script acceptance or the right to ol 
ject to some part of the show or sorl 
doubtful talent," an agencyman r] 
cently reported to sponsor. 



HANDS OFF: Sponsor Standard Oil of N4 
Jersey insisted on clause divorcing itself frc| 
any form of show control on Play of The Wei, 
WNTA-TV, N. Y. Here, actor Per Sjostrand, prl 
ducer Lew Freedman and Bud Wilds, coni 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 19(1 



.EFT STANDING OUTSIDE-LOOKING IN 





RED SKELTON SHOW: CBS TV is sole owner of this 
program and 10 others. Above, from Christmas show 



_\BC TV claims only three night 
tv shows as wholly controled: 
4 Bonanza, World Wide 60 and Sunday 
± Showcase, ten others (including such 
t| segment-sales types as Riverboat) are 
"■partially controled''; that is, NBC 
T\ has script and casting approval 
' at the producing studio. The re- 
mainder of the network's vehicles are 
i* produced outside by packagers work- 
t ing with agencies, but a representa- 
tive of NBC TV's programing depart- 
[flment is on the sets whether they're 
■I being shot in New York or on the 
r|oWest Coast. Before any show is aired 
| on NBC TV, Ross Donaldson, direc- 
ijitor of script services, has read the 
script (and maybe penciled in 
rchanges) or previewed the films. "The 
!ii trend next year," said Donaldson, "is 
indefinitely towards more NBC devel- 
,h oped and produced programs." 
I But this still doesn't mean that the 
sponsor has nothing to say. "Con- 
i trol conies in many packages; a lot 
of contracts, for example, give spon- 
|t sors the right to okay scripts in ad- 
ifl vance. 

| At CBS TV, 11 of its nighttime 
; programs are wholly-owned network 
! properties. These are: Small World, 
Twentieth Century. Ed Sullivan, Den- 
I nis O'Keefe, Red Skelton, The Mil 
}| lionaire, Rawhide, Person to Person, 
Hotel De Puree, Have Gun, -Will 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL I960 



Travel and Gunsmoke. Then there is 
the co-produced fare (owned by CBS 
and an outside producer) such as: 
Jack Benny, Garry Moore, I've Got 
a Secret, Twilight Zone and Perry 
Mason. The rest of the CBS TV 
schedule is "controled by advertisers 
— with, of course, sanction of the 
net's continuity department. 

Probably nothing sums up better 
the trend toward more net control 
than the fact that last spring sponsor- 
scope estimated that ABC controled 
(>.V i of its regularly scheduled shows 
and that the network's own claim for 
next season is 99%. 

Why are networks eager to assume 
more control? For one thing. the) 
feel it lifts the creative and artistic 
standards of its productions. Certain- 
ly no better example of this "creative 
freedom" can be found than the non- 
network Play of The Week (produced 
by NTA, aired on indie WNTA-TV, 
N.Y.C., and now being sold to sta- 
tions in other markets). In the New 
York market, the two-hour show has 
been bought for full sponsorship by 
Standard Oil Co. of N. J. (OB&M). 
M. J. Rathbone, president of Jersey 
Standard, said, "At Jersey Standard's 
own request, one clause of our con- 
tract specifies that we will have no 
voice in the subject matter, script, 
production techniques or cast of each 



week's play. This is a hands-off pol- 
icy that we have traditionally fol- 
lowed in our long sponsorship of 
daily newscasts." The result has been 
a ratings-topper and critic captivator. 

But the creative is only one side of 
network interest in controling their 
shows. If a network owns the show, 
then the sponsor can't take it away 
and put it on another network. (Ex- 
ample: last year, the agency and cli- 
ent took Father Knows Best from 
NBC, gave it to CBS.) Nor can an 
agency and client use a show they 
don't control as a club to bludgeon 
favors (such as fatter discounts) out 
of the network. 

"Unless a network is the owner of 
its shows," Julius Barnathan, ABC 
TV vice president, told sponsor, "it 
is in the untenable position of being 
open to raids."' In other words, if 
several major advertisers suddenly 
decided to pick up their marbles and 
leave, they could almost wipe out a 
net's whole schedule. 

The other big advantage a net 
finds in controling its own programs 
is the fact that it can shift them 
around at will, like so 
pieces, to form strong blocks of pro- 
graming that can attract ;i<i 
But if, in the middle of such a block, 
is a show that is owne 1 \ an adver- 
{Please turn to page 98) 




MEANY MEETS MORGAN— AFL-CIO head, George Mean 
newscasts, exercises no authority or censorship over material i 



faces ABC r, 
id has sometin 



nentator, Edward P. Morgan. Labor sponsors Morgai 
arget of Morgan verbal lashing on controversial issue 



HOW AFL— CIO BUDGETS FOR P.R. 



^ Biggest chunk ($475,000) of p.r. fund goes to ra- 
dio, as labor begins second decade of news sponsorship 

^ Federation uses soft-sell, promotes image with news- 
casts that reach an estimated 4.6 million listeners daily 



I he AFL-CIO gets a hearing five 
evenings a week in the library of 
former Secretary of State, Dean 

\ch.--Mti. 

\t 6:55 p.m.. Monday to Friday. 
the library doors open. Then Mr. 
Acheson. or a \ isitor like Justice 
Felix Frankfurter, announces to the 
guests, "'It's time for Morgan." Five 
minutes later tin- doors close and all 
who have chosen to join Acheson 
spend the next 15 minutes in silence 
listening to the AFL-CIO sponsored 
newscaster, Edward P. Morgan. 
Though the ritual may vary, the 



end is the same in nearlv 1.3 million 
homes across the country. Morgan has 
a loyal following, and the Federation 
a receptive audience for its messages. 
The evening doesn't end at 7:15 
for the labor group. At 10 p.m. thej 
sponsor the 5-minute J andercook and 
the News and reach 1.1 million 
homes. This means that the total 
number of home impressions amassed 
by the AFL-CIO via 20 minutes of 
ABC radio network news averages out 
to 2.4 million (or 4.6 million listener 
impressions^, every day. five days a 
week. 52 weeks a vear. The cost-per- 



1.000 homes impressions: $.36. 

The figures take on added signifi- 
cance because labor is reaching the 
kind of audience its after. AFL- . 
CIO broadcasts are heard by more 
men than women < 58 % -42 ( i i and 
70' I are between the ages of 18 and 
49. The percentage of non-union I 
listenership has been increasing over a 
the years, and today stands at 57^.1 
which highlights the public relations I 
job being done by radio in creating a vi 
favorable climate for organized labor I 
among non-union personnel. This is I 
one of the main objectives of thef! 
campaign. Radio cuts across income! 
boundaries: the broadcasts draw ■ 
nearly equal representation from all* 
income levels. Leading citizens like! 
James Thurber. Norman Cousins. ( 
Senators John Kennedy. Wayne I 
Morse. William Proxmire and Hubert I 
Humphrey served to round out the! 
broadcast audience profile and lend r| 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



it literary and legislative distinction. 
Labor's infatuation with radio be- 
gan over a decade ago with the AFL's 
sponsorship of the Frank Edwards 
newscasts on Mutual. Edwards, a 
staunch supporter of union causes 
soon became associated in the public 
mind as "the voice of labor." The 
AFL pulled no punches in its com- 
mercials. They were hard-hitting, 
and unabashedly hard-sell. 

The second great labor organiza- 
tion, the CIO, joined the radio ranks 
in September of 1953. However, the 
CIO attacked the problem of creating 
a favorable image in a different way. 
Their stated objective was "to dispel 
the notion that all unions do is go on 
strike.'' by affirming a "what's good 
for America is good for organized 
labor'" policy. The choice of the CIO 
was John W. Vandercook, a liberal 
commentator with a cultured voice 
and subdued manner. Commercials 
were kept at a low pitch, informed 
rather than persuaded. Whereas mes- 
sages on the Edwards show were of- 
ten calculated to rally union members 
behind the parent organization, the 
CIO never aired a commercial that 
was keyed solely to its constituents. 
Today's approach to commercials and 
newscasts is basically a continuation 
of the CIO soft-sell formula. 

On 5 December 1955, the AFL and 
CIO joined forces to become a single 
Federation. The newscasts were main- 
tained, but in a new format. Morgan, 
who had previously replaced Wil- 
liams, remained in the 7 p.m. slot on 
i ABC, while Vandercook moved to 
10 p.m., the current labor line-up. 
t The five-minute Vandercook show, 
abbreviated as an economy measure, 
holds the key to Federation strategy. 
A sponsored newscast, it has no com- 
mercial. There are opening and clos- 
ing mentions of the sponsor's name, 
unembellished by any message. The 
AFL-CIO feels that the good will en- 
gendered by sponsoring a responsible 
newscaster is of sufficiently great 
value in itself. Within the five-minute 
frame, time is of the essence. The 
more time allowed for Vandercook's 
comment, the more valuable a public 
service the show becomes, i.e., the 
greater benefit derived by the spon- 
sor from his association with it. Thus 
a commercial, in this instance, would 



• 2 APRIL 1960 



only detract from the Federation's 
over-all objective. 

The Federation exercises no censor- 
ship of material selected by the news- 
casters. On 18 November 1959, the 
AFL-CIO devoted the middle com- 
mercial on the Morgan show to stat- 
ing just this: "The only acceptable 
news commentator is independent . . . 
free to report and comment on news 
as it happens. We believe in a democ- 
racy where people must be able to 
count on accurate and unbiased news. 
Mr. Morgan's views are strictly his 
own. The sponsors know them only 
when we hear them on the air." 



Morgan, underscoring the point, pro- 
ceeded to blast certain of the trade 
unions he believed were proceeding 
too slowly with integration. 

The AFL-CIO backs up its spon- 
sored newscasts with tun L5-minute 
public service radio shows carried by- 
several hundred stations on a sustain- 
ing basis. ( For tv aspect see box 
below. I 

The group strategists (Al Zack, 
p.r. director; William Flannen . ra- 
dio coordinator; Morris Novik, ra- 
dio/tv consultant) anticipate for 
AFL-CIO a second radio decade as 
rewarding as the first. ^ 



LABOR'S ALSO ON TELEVISION 



'Vy 




%w 




" > 1 




ON THE JOB, camera crew shoots footage for AFLCi 
produced 15-minute public service feature, Am 
Work, aired by 85 television outlets on a sustain 



NEW OUT-OF-HOME RADIO DATA 



^ What is the truth about auto radio? Is it being over- 
sold or undersold? Is it a valuable factor or just a bonus? 

^ Here is how timebuyers view out-of-home audiences 
and what is being done by services to up their price tags 



NIELSEN FIVE-MARKET AUTO PLUS 

Homes Using 
New York (NSI, August 1959) Radio (%) Auto Plus (%) 


SUNDAY 


8:30- 9:00 pm 


3 


117 


SATURDAY 


8:30- 9:00 pm 


4 


74 


MON. — FRI. 


7:30- 8:00 am 


16 


28 


SUNDAY 


7:30- 8:00 am 


5 


9 


New Orleans 


(NSI, August 1959) 






SATURDAY 


11:30-12:00 pm 


1 


130 


MON. — FRI. 


6:00- 6:30 am 


2 


89 


MON. — FRI. 


7:00- 7:30 am 


6 


56 


MON. — FRI. 


10:30-11:00 am 


15 


11 


Philadelphia 


(NSI, August 1959) 






SUNDAY 


3:30- 4:00 pm 


4 


130 


SUNDAY 


8:30- 9:00 pm 


3 


115 


MON. — FRI. 


4:30- 5:00 pm 


8 


64 


MON. — FRI. 


12:30- 1.00 pm 


12 


20 


Chicago (NS 


, July 1959) 






SUNDAY 


8:30- 9:00 pm 


3 


100 


SATURDAY 


6:00- 6:30 am 


3 


38 


MON. — FRI. 


4:30- 5:00 pm 


10 


51 


MON. — FRI. 


8:30- 9:00 am 


20 


15 


Los Angeles 


NSI, July 1959) 




1 


SATURDAY 


7:00- 7:30 pm 


8 


56 


SUNDAY 


5:00- 5:30 pm 


10 


4.5 


MON. — FRI. 


7:30- 8:00 am 


15 


42 


MON. — FRI. 


9:00- 9:30 am 


16 


12 


Source: Nlehan 


„ 







In the spring," to paraphrase the 
poet, an adman's fancy often turns 
to thoughts of summer radio. Con- 
tingent with this fancy looms the 
significance of out-of-home audiences 
— in cars, at vacation spots, beaches, 
playgrounds. 

The only questions: Is the out-of- 
home audience being adequately 
measured? What factors do agen- 
cies apply in appraisal of out-of- 
home? How have advertiser atti- 
tudes changed in evaluating radio 
away from home? 

Media research head for one of 
the top 10 agencies in air media told 
sponsor, "Good judgment plus the 
Nielsen pocket piece is pretty much 
our yardstick for out-of-home. 
Whether Nielsen, The Pulse or Hoop- 
er, this is the formula of just about 
every major agency in putting a 
value on out-of-home radio." 

A timebuyer for another "Top- 
10'er" said, "One must never forget 
that the out-of-home audience changes 
by time of day and by market. It's 
also well to remember that the audi- 
ence composition varies along with 
these other factors. If Junior has the 
car in the evening, chances are rock- 
'n-roll is tuned in; when Dad's driv- 
ing to work, it's likely to be a regular I 
morning show. It's highly unlikely 
that a housewife ever listens to a soap 
opera in her car on the way to the 
shopping center (this may have had 
something to do with the fading away 
of radio soapers). On weekends, it's 
a pretty safe bet that a 'magazine' 
show such as NBC's Monitor gets a 
hearing. These are all factors that 
must be considered along with the 
actual 'auto-plus.' " 

"If there's am fault to be found 
with measurement of out-of-home 
radio," another media analyst said, 
"it's that the sample is small and ra- 
dio ratings themselves are low." 

Still another agency media man 
had this to say to sponsor: "It's 
becoming more and more prevalent 
among timebuyers to regard out-of- 
home radio as a significant element 
rather than simply a bonus. They 
may do their analyses for the most 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



SPARK NEW BUYER QUESTIONS 



part on the basis of in-home listen- 
ing, but are throwing more weight 
to the out-of-home audience." 

The radio rating services have been 
more than cognizant of all of these 
attitudes in the industry. They know 
there's a vast, profitable audience of 
radio listeners out there on highways 
and beaches, and they know that the 
advertisers also know this. No mat- 
ter how this audience is measured — 
by personal interviews, telephone co- 
incidental, meters, or surveys at park- 
ing lots, supermarkets, and traffic 
lights — that it is one that counts. 

For one thing, there is no more 
captive an audience than one in a se- 
dan on a long haul over the highway. 
For another, this audience is a par- 
ticularly valuable one for certain 
clients, especially advertisers of gaso- 
line, motor oils, automotive parts 
such as mufflers and seat covers, soft 
drinks, beers, cigarettes and other 
items sold along highways. 

Since it was first explored, out-of- 
home listening has been shown to 
pick up every year which is hardly 
surprising with more than 80% of 
the cars being equipped with radios 
and the boom in portable sets that 
has come about through transistors. 
Last summer, The Pulse, Inc. found 
that out-of-home listening continued 
on the upgrade, adding about 30% 
to the in-home summer audience. 

New York proved highest in o-o-h 
level between 6 a.m. and midnight. 
Boston, San Francisco and Los An- 
geles were next in line (see chart). 

At the A. C. Nielsen Co., J. K. 
Churchill, vice president, said, "Auto 
listening, nationwide, is now continu- 
ously measured as a separate activity. 
Because of its comparability to fam- 
ily listening, we customarily treat 
this as a 'plus' to in-home listening 
with an average value ranging from 
25% to 50% or more of in-home 
listening depending on the season." 
(Sometimes it ranges to 100%, but 
it must be remembered that out-of- 
home listening is highest when in- 
home listening is lowest, and vice 
versa) . 

"We elected to refrain from publi- 



cation of any of those findings, but 
have been guided in our develop- 
mental work by what we found." 

Churchill then made these basic 
points: "More passengers per car 
seem to cut back reliance on radio 
as a 'companion.' Higher road speeds 
and open windows means higher 
noise levels and less radio. Longer 



average runs mean pre-set tunings 
aren't the most effective station selec- 
tors. 'At work' listening is a real 
toughie (all loud-speaker music isn't 
radio; some is wire music)." 

Whether it's getting its full due or 
not, out-of-home radio is getting a 
much longer look by media men to- 
day than ever before. ^ 



PULSE AUTO PLUS IN 26 MARKETS 



ATLANTA 


15.2 


4.5 


19.7 


29.6 


BALTIMORE 


13.4 


4.3 


17.7 


32.1 


BIRMINGHAM 


15.5 


4.5 


19.0 


29.0 


BOSTON 


16.4 


5.6 


22.0 


34.1 


BUFFALO 


16.4 


4.7 


21.1 


28.7 


CHICAGO 


16.1 


5.0 


21.1 


31.1 


CINCINNATI 


13.0 


4.5 


17.5 


34.6 


CLEVELAND 


14.0 


4.3 


18.3 


30.7 


COLUMBUS, OHIO 


16.3 


4.4 


20.7 


27.0 


DETROIT 


14.3 


4.7 


19.0 


32.9 


FORT WORTH 


15.6 


4.7 


20.3 


30.1 


HOUSTON 


16.7 


4.5 


21.2 


26.9 


KANSAS CITY 


16.8 


5.0 


21.8 


29.8 


LOS ANGELES 


17.9 


5.4 


23.3 


30.2 


MIAMI 


18.5 


4.8 


23.3 


25.9 


MILWAUKEE 


17.3 


5.2 


22.5 


30.1 


MPLS.-ST. PAUL 


17.1 


4.3 


21.4 


25.1 


NEW ORLEANS 


16.0 


3.6 


19.6 


22.5 


NEW YORK 


16.3 


5.7 


22.0 


35.0 


PHILADELPHIA 


17.8 


3.9 


21.7 


21.9 


PITTSBURGH 


15.6 


4.4 


20.0 


28.2 


ST. LOUIS 


16.9 


4.6 


21.5 


27.2 


SAN DIEGO 


16.8 


5.1 


21.9 


30.4 


SAN FRANCISCO 


18.4 


5.5 


23.9 


29.9 


SEATTLE 


17.8 


4.6 


22.4 


25.8 


WASHINGTON 


15.1 


4.6 


19.7 


30.5 



Average, 29 Markets 

Source: Tiie Pulse. Summei 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 






HOUSE FOR SALE gets tv pitch from veteran broadcaster Cy Newman, who originated House Detective show now moving properties 



Full-page real estate ads on tv 



^ House Detective, tv's answer to real estate page, hits 
$100,000,000 in New York, $1,250,000 in Richmond 

^ Extensive photography, along with announcer's 
full discussion of details arouses home-buyer interest 



l^lewspapers are facing a keen con- 
tender for their long-safe real estate 
ad dollars. 

A dramatic demonstration of tv's 
ability to sell homes currently is un- 
derway in -i\ markets, with a seventh 
to he added this month. It's House 
Detective, a local, live or taped, pro- 
gram that brings the real estate page 
to t\ on a grand scale and has regis- 
tered documented sales of over $100,- 
000,000 during a six-year run in 
Neti York, and more than 11, 250,000 
last \ear in Richmond, Va. The show's 



packager, Cy Newman, is certain that 
the actual figures — and they're 
tirely attributable to tv — are consid- 
erably higher. 

The show offers large screen pro 
jection shots of each property's ex 
terior plus conventional size close- 
ups of exterior and interior. Its an- 
nouncer furnishes viewers with com 
plete financial information, a descrip 
tion of the areas, facilities and direc- 
tions on how to get there. He also 
discusses techniques in buying and 
taking care of a home, often inter- 



viewing experts in the field on these 
subjects. 

Gross billings for the six stations 
now earning Detective total about 
$4,500 per week. Thev are WCYB- 
TV, Bristol. WAVY-TV. Norfolk. 
WRVA-TV, Richmond and WDBJ- 
TV, Roanoke, all Virginia; KCOP 
(TV), Los Angeles; KGNC-TV 
Amarillo. Tex. The added starter. 
23 April, is WUSN-TV, Charleston. 
S. C. 

Each locality has its own announ- 
cer-salesman, hired through New- 
man's H.D. Productions, who is pro- 
vided with office space and clerical 
help bj the station. In addition to 
doing the show, he is in effect a sta- 
tion time salesman, but only for De- 
tective. 

Favorite time period for the show, 
though other slots are also used, is 
(Please turn to page 101 ) 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



Babies: $1V£ billion ad headache 



^ Baby products have unique market problem: num- 
jer of mothers and babies is limited though constant 

^ There's a maximum of 20 million infants, babies 
inder 5 years for a growing number of manufacturers 



^Advertising pros view the baby 
narket with mixed feelings. They 
ike to work in it because the market 
:s constant — though small — and be- 
cause consumption never diminishes. 
But they look longingly at their adult- 
product confreres who have market- 
ing pluses unknown to baby mar- 
keters. 

For example, most consumers 
switch brands with ease and fre- 
quency — and one of advertising's 
first tasks is to encourage them to do 
ust this. Not so in the baby market, 
however, where — the experts say — 
once a mother has selected a brand 
?he sticks with it through the baby- 
hood. 

Most manufacturers use advertising 
to increase their product consump- 
tion. But, again, this isn't the case 
with baby items. A baby can consume 
just so much applesauce, dispose of 

fixed number of diapers, absorb a 
certain quantity of lotion and oil. 

So baby marketers are confronted 
with (a) a fixed market of 20 million 
infants and babies, at a maximum, 
and (h) a mother who is loyal to a 
single brand. This, to most of these 
baby marketers, means their task — 
and that of advertising — is to in- 
crease their share of the market 
rather than the market itself. 

The market, limited though it may 
be, is nevertheless gigantic. 

Last year consumers spent an esti- 
mated $l}/2 billion on just four ma- 
jor product lines aimed at babies — 
foods, toiletries, toys and apparel. 

sponsor uses as a working classi- 
fication of a "baby" any infant or 
youngster up to five years of age — 
a total of 20 million (see chart, next 
page). Many products in the baby- 
market, however, have limited use 
even in this five-year span. Infant 
items are seldom used more than 18 

sponsor • 2 APRIL 1960 



months, two years at the outside. 
The world's "population explosion" 
is rapid and huge, but the U. S. 
pace is far slower and more predict- 
able. For the past two or three years, 
the annual births have hovered around 
the four million mark (up from 
about three million, however, a scant 
eight years ago). Projections indi- 
cate the continuing growth in births 
will be moderate (see chart, next 
page). Between 1960 and 1965, pro- 



jections indicate the annual birth 
rate will go from 4.3 million to 4.9 
million, a gain of 600,000. 

Despite this fairly static market of 
babies and mothers, most national 
advertisers manufacturing baby prod- 
ucts are adding to their lines. And 
they're finding competition moving 
in with new, similar products. The 
giants in each product line hereto- 
fore may have battled only one ma- 
jor competitor for share of market, 
but from here on in it looks as though 
most will see several companies fight- 
ing with them. 

Baby product manufacturers, par- 
ticularly those in the food and toi- 
letries lines, have long since taken 
this selling tack: They move in fast 
in trying to reach the pregnant wom- 
an and/or the new mother. To do 



NATIONAL DISTRIBUTION i 



advertising problems. Gerber and Hei 
U.S. outlets. Most baby products at 




this they cam on extensive sam- 
pling, issue hospital "kit-." contact 
nurses, doctors and pediatrician-, ad- 
vertise in bab] ! Its, work closely 

with drugstores and supermarket-. \ 
company with an estahlished name in 
other product lines — such as Heinz 
and Playtex — tries to carry over the 
established name value and reputa- 
tion to the baby line. 

All of them work diligentlv at the 
local retail level to gain distribution 
and favorable store space. A heavy 
cost item for the baby food com- 
panies is the tradition of them pay- 
ing for field crews, who stock and 
service food store shelves, clean them, 
keep inventory and rotate competitive 
brands acording to the store man- 
ager's blueprint. This is an expen- 
sive and time-consuming need, be- 
cause the average major baby food 
company puts out from 60 to 80 
• in the case of Heinz, 110 i different 
varieties. 

And, as a v.p. of Young & Rubi- 
cam said, "This stuff moves like 
greased lightning! The average wom- 
an buys 10 bottles or jars at a time, 
sometimes even 20 or 30. As a 
result the store shelves have to be 
restocked frequently." 




DRUGSTORES and supermarkets are top 
outlets tor baby items. Big sellers are Playtex 
(International Latex) Dryper diaper, pants, 
which use heavy spot tv schedules. Account 
supervisor is Bernard Lewy, Reach, McClintcn 



The three product groups which 
have the biggest sales in the baby- 
market are toys, food and drugs and 
toiletries. Toys alone. < see chart, 
page 46 1 average a $26 per capita 
annual investment for a total of $525 
million. Cereals, canned and jarred 
baby foods and milk modifiers and 
formulas account for another 8338 
million, with toiletry products rep- 
resenting a sales gross of $149 mil- 
lion. 

\^ ith the exception of tov com- 
panies, baby product manufacturers 
traditionally have used baby books, 
the romance books, Sunday supple- 
ments and other print media. In re- 
cent years, tov companies have gone 
heavily into television, and the clients 
making other baby items are also 
moving in this direction. 

Among toy company tv sponsors: 
Marx. Mattel. Remeo, American Char- 
acter Doll, Hassenfield Brothers, 
Ideal, Lionel. Gilbert, Transogram, 
Structo and Emenee. (Some of their 
toy products, of course, are sold for 
youngsters beyond the baby classifi- 
cation, i 

An analysis of March network tv 
schedules reported by Leading Na- 
tional Advertisers — Broadcast Adver- 



tisers Reports, indicates this suit. 
mary of baby product usage for eighl 
clients. 

1. Beech-Nut Life Savers, through 
\ oung & Rubicam, has bought Op 
eration Daybreak on ABC TV, witt 
one-minute commercials slotted ii 
six daytime programs rotated Mon 
day through Friday from 12:45 t 
4:15 p.m. for its baby foods an< 
juices, i A BAR spot report on th< 
New \ ork market, for the week end 
ing 26 February, shows a total 
51 announcements, of which 40 wer^ 
for baby foods and one for juices. 

2. Colorforms. through Kudnei 
is buying Monday and Thursdav seg 
ments of CBS TV's morning chii 
dren's entry. Captain Kangaroo ( spo 
tv supplements I . 

3. Johnson & Johnson, througl 
Young & Rubicam. participates fa 
ABC TV's Operation Daybreak wit! 
minutes in seven programs, five da\ 
time and two nighttime, ranging o: 
Monday" through Friday and on Sur 
day from 12:45 p.m. to 10:15 p.n 

4. Mennen. through Grey Advei 
tising. buys a Thursday showing o 
/ Love Lucy on CBS T\ . 

5. Mattel, through Carson. Rob 
erts. sponsors its own Matty's Sunda 



MARKET STRATEGY tor new network tv campaign is planned by Mennen and Grey Ac 
vertising executives. The buy: / Love Lucy on CBS TV for three baby items. L to r., Oarle: 
Dentinger, ad mgr.; Irving Kiem, mdsg. mgr.; Robert S. Zimmern, v.p. and a.e.; Mitchell Sher. 
man, a.e.; Paul Minor, tv producer; James Schisgall, a.e.; Robert Smith, product mgi 
Howard, copy group supvr. Despite heavy-up in tv, most of sales impetus hits at local 
with personal contact involving mothers-to-be, mothers, medical professionals, druggists, etc 




HOW BIG IS THE BABY MARKET? 



A. NUMBER OF BABIES, BY AGE AND SEX 

Source: Toys and Novelties publications. Jan. 1959 figures 



AGE 


TOTAL 


BOYS 


GIRLS 


Infants 


4.060.000 


2.070.000 


1,990,000 


1 and 3 


8.280.000 


4,235,000 


4,045,000 


3 and 4 


7,849,000 


4,020,000 


3.829,000 


TOTAL 


20,198,000 


10,325,000 


9,864,000 



WHAT IS THE NATIONAL BIRTH-RATE TREND? 

Source: Parent's magazine {based on Current Population Reports) 



Only eight years ago the annual birth rate was three millii 
babies born annually has leie/ed off near the four million 



babies. For the past three years, the 
ark. Here are six-year projections for i 



mber of 

births: 



1960 


4,330,000 


1963 


4,578,000 


1961 


4,411,000 


1964 


4,665,000 


1962 


4,494,000 


1965 


4.934.000 



TOYS 1 


$525,000,000 




APPAREL 2 


15,390,000 



C. HOW MUCH MONEY IS SPENT ON BABY PRODUCTS? 

(Annual figures, with sources noted.) 

DRUGS, TOILETRIES 4 153,970,000 

Infant suppositories 3,590,000 

Baby powder 20,520,000 

Oils and lotions 15,290.000 

Shampoos 3,010.000 

Nursing bottles 12,320,000 

Nipples, pacifiers 7,500,000 

Pants 48,670,000 

Cotton swabs 13,250,000 

Bottle sterilizers 7,130,000 

Bottle warmers 4,840,000 

Baby food warmers 3,350.000 

Disposable diapers, liners 8,640,000 

Scales 1,110,000 

Baby Aspirin 4,750,000 



FOOD 3 

Infant cereals 



338,300.000 
26,840,000 



Canned baby foods 



250.720.000 3A 



Milk modifiers and 
formulas 



60,740,000 



1. Source: Toys and Xovelties put 
years old and less. 2. Source: Inf 
packs. 4. Drug Topics, 1958 figure 



Funnies for youngsters on ABC TV. 
6. Pet Milk, through Gardner Ad- 
vertising, advertises its processed 
milk products on CBS TV with Red 
Skelton on Tuesday night and Edge 
of Night Wednesday afternoon. 

Gerber, through D'Arcy, on be- 
half of its baby and junior foods and 



juices, picks up the Friday portion 
of / Love Lucy on CBS TV. 

8. H. J. Heinz, through Maxon, 
allots between 25 % and 30% of its 
allowable commercial mentions in its 
NBC TV program schedule to the 
baby line. It has eight daytime shows 
on Wednesday and Thursday, rang- 



ing from 10:15 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. 

The pattern in this network run- 
down quickly emerges: b 
advertisers in the in. 
time tv. Why ? 

William H. Parshall. i Ivertising 

manager of Hei answer: 

(Please tui \ - 102) 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 




NIGHT RADIO 
ROLLS UP 
MORE SALES 



NIGHT RADIO often has different copy approach. Duncan Mounsey, 
I, exec, v.p.-g.m., WPTR, Albany, N. Y., who highlights results on page 
39, records commercials for Saratoga Vichy with Monty Wooley 



^ Here's a follow-up to SPONSOR'S 23 January story 
on the comeback of nighttime radio on net, local levels 

^ Albany station details wide variety of sponsors and 
sales successes after dark, expects 10 p.m. -6 a.m. sellout 



Ma 



■ any advertisers are well aware 
of the fact that their budget alloca- 
tions by market are stretched signifi- 
cantly with the purchase of nighttime 
radio. But some clients and their 
agencies, caught up in a full tv sweep, 
sometimes forget temporarily how the 
cost, reach and impact of nighttime 
hours can help them. 

For this reason, SPONSOR asked a 
station which has pioneered night- 
time radio in a large metropolitan 
market — one which is also tv-satu- 
rated — to outline some of the diversi 
ty of advertisers, radio technique; 
and results which the sponsors 
post-10 p.m. time periods represent. 
The spokesman: Duncan Mounsey. 
executive vice president and genera 
manager of WPTR, Albany, N. Y. 



Some of his sponsor vignettes ap- 
pear on the next page. How success- 
ful is nighttime for advertisers? He 
thinks the answer lies in the fact that 
he expects to be completely sold out 
from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m. 

Why use night radio when, pre- 
sumably, people are watching tele- 
vision, getting ready to retire or 
asleep? Because, says Mr. Mounsey, 
a significant number of them are lis- 
tening to radio. He contends, "The 
audience that a national advertiser 
may lose at night, because of fewer 
sets in use, is probably very largely 
offset by the coverage factor." 

In his opinion, "Radio's audience 
composition has a constant level of 
listeners at all times, and national 
products are sold everywhere. With 



today's rapid transportation, large 
retail chains and radio's massive ac- 
cumulative audiences, the important 
factor is not so much when you reach 
them or who they are but that you 
reach them again and again." 

Because of lessened costs during 
the nighttime hours, extra frequency 
is available to the sponsor. And, in 
the opinion of some night buyers, the 
receptivity to their commercials is 
enhanced because the "night people" 
have fewer distractions and a more 
radio-concentrated attentiveness. 

An added factor in many industrial 
areas is the number of persons work- 
ing late hours or on night shifts. In 
a sizeable market, the potential num- 
ber of listeners plays a more signifi- 
cant part in the scheduling of radio 
announcements. Still another cost ad- 
vantage is the availability of fre- 
quency discounts and lowered per- 
announcement costs when daytime is 
supplemented with nighttime. 

A growing number of sponsors 
acquire discounts as well as needed 
frequency by slotting commercials 
around the broadcast clock. ^ 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



SOME NIGHTTIME RADIO CLIENTS AND RESULTS 



• AT 3 A.M., a station announcer aired 
a "lucky house number" offering free trip 
to Florida if winner called within 30 minutes. 
In 16 days, there were 14 winners. 



• STEEFEL'S CLOTHING stores started 
in radio with a WPTR schedule and continue 
vertises) . They expanded original pre-10 p.m. 
with the station (the only one on which it ad- 
announcement schedules to a 1^-hour span 
starting at 3 p.m. and ending at 11 a.m. the 
next day. This broadcast plan was made after 
a fire which caused considerable water and 
smoke damage Thirty-eight 30-second an- 
nouncements in this time period resulted in a 
complete sellout of the special merchandise 
offer by 10 a.m. the next morning. The adver- 
tising continues despite a rate hike of 250%. 



• MORRIS KAPLAN, owner of Airway 
Motors, a Chrysler-Ply mouth-1 mperial dealer 
in nearby Rennselaer, airs 100 announcements 
weekly on WPTR at the rate of 50 after 10 
p.m. spread over a seven-day schedule. In his 
initial schedule on the station, Mr. Kaplan or- 
dered 50 announcements weekly from mid- 
night to 6 a.m. This sponsor reported sale of 
108 cars in eight days in August, a gross of 
more than $300,000 at a time when other deal- 
ers were having difficulty in moving any cars. 
Last October, the sponsor was completely sold 
out of stock and scoured the state for more '59 
models. (Former newspaper money is now tv.) 



• UTICA CLUB BEER, a WPTR spon- 
sor since last summer, bought saturation 
schedules between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. In De- 
cember, when beer sales were down, this 
brand showed an increase of 18% in the sta- 
tion s coverage area. It used only this one 
station, and since then has signed for 52 weeks 
and a 2^-hour, seven-day a week air schedule. 



• CONERTY PONTIAC of Troy last 
week bought a post- midnight-only package of 
13 commercials weekly for four weeks in the 
midnight to 6 a.m. slot. One reason for the 
buy: a check of all automotive service shops 
indicated many listeners to post-midnight 
radio. (Station usually has six car accounts.) 

• SANFORD L. LEACH, vice president 
of Kay's Drugs, Inc., Schenectady, bought a 
^-announcement nighttime schedule over a 
three-day period. His theory: "It was an in- 
vestment in our own business, and it was re- 
turned three-fold in just one night!" The 
"sell-a-thon" netted, among other results, the 
sale of a $200 camera at 5 o'clock in the 
morning. The campaign copy theme: "Do 
your shopping after midnight; avoid the 
crowds." Station supplied the sale copy. 

• IN A PUBLIC SERVICE effort, WPTR 
aired an announcement of the local post office 
that 130 part-time adult male employees 
should not report to work at midnight because 
there ivas no work for them. Five mentions on 
an hourly news show between 6:30 and 11:30 
p.m. resulted in 65% of the workers learning 
the news, not reporting for work. 

• M. A. ROSENHEIM, president of Ac- 
teen, Inc., which manufactures Politeen (acne 
medication) used this one station only and 
post-midnight radio to introduce the product 
to the market. He attributed to WPTR "a 
higher per capita sale for the product than for 
any market in the country," and termed it 
"particularly gratifying" because Midwest 
markets usually show the highest per capita 
sales. Crediting success to "sales efficacy" of 
the station, he said inquiries had come from 
wholesalers in New England in response to 
WPTR even though no advertising w 

at or scheduled in that area. 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



m 







TOP PRO 

GOLF 



FIRST RERUNS OF ABC-TV 
"ALL-STAR GOLF" NOW AVAILABLE 
FOR LOCAL SALE 



DEC.195S RATINGS 
MARKET BY MARKET 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 9.3 

Augusta, Ga 15.3 

Baltimore, Md 16.0 

Birmingham, Ala. 15.9 

Boston, Mass 9.0 

Cadillac-Traverse 

City, Mich 12.8 

Charleston, S. C 13.8 

Cleveland, Ohio 8.7 

Columbia— Jefferson 

City, Mo 17.5 

Columbus, Ohio 9.4 

Dallas, Tex.. 10.5 

Davenport— Rock 

lsland-Moline.il!... 11. 3 
Des Moines- Ames, la... .13.6 

Detroit, Mich 8.3 

Durham- Raleigh, N. C... 9.3 
Evansville, Ind- 

Anderson, Ky 16.1 

Fresno, Calif 11.0 

Grand Raptds- 

Kaiamazoo, Mich 10.2 

Greensbor o- Winston- 
Salem, N.C 12.5 

Houston, Tex 11.2 

Jackson, Miss 17.4 

Jacksonville, Ha 20.1 

Johnson City, Tenn - 

Bristol, Va 17.3 

Kansas City, Mo 11.0 

Louisville, Ky 18.0 

Milwaukee, Wise 9.3 

Nashville, Tenn 14.7 

Norfolk- Portsmouth- 
Newport, Va. 25.3 

Omaha, Nebr 14.4 

Philadelphia, Pa. 9.3 

Pittsburgh, Pa 11.3 

Portland, Ore 10.6 

Richmond- Petersburg, 

Va 11.3 

Rome-Utica, N. Y. 19.6 

Salt Lake City-Ogden- 

Provo,Utah 11.6 

San Antonio, Tex 15.0 

San Francisco- 
Oakland, Calif 9.8 

Santa Barbara— San 

Louis Obispo, Calif... 20.1 

Savannah, Ga 15.0 

Shreveport/La 15.0 

Sioux City, la 11.5 

Tulsa, Okla 9.7 



One hour of action-packed thrills- 
catching millions of viewers at the 
height of their golf enthusiasm! 

Built-in sponsor loyalty 
during the big sportswear, 
beverage, outdoor living and 
spending season. 

Released market-by-market 
just two weeks ago . . . 42 top 
markets already closed. 

For details— wire or call 

WALTER SCHWIMMER, INC. 

FRanklin 2-4392 
75 East Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, Illinois 



TELEPULSE 9 


1 RATINGS: TOP SPO 


I 


Top 10 shows in 10 or more 
markets: 16-22 Dec, 4-17 Jan. 

1960 
TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 


National 


7STATI0N 
MARKETS 


5-STA. 
MARKET 


4-STATION 


MARKETS 






N.Y. L.A. 


Seattle 


Cliicaoo Detroit Minpls. 


St. Louis San Fran. Wash. 


Atlanta Bait. B Satan Buffalo C 




Sea Hunt 

*'v (Adventure) 


19.0 


9.2 12.7 

10:30pm 10:30pm 


25.7 


25.0 24.4 19.2 

9:30pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 


17.5 25.9 10.9 

10:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 


16.2 9.0 15.7 21.9 1 

w.-b-tv wbal-tv whdh-tT wkbw-tr wij 
7:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 7 3 




Mike Hammer 
-c* (Mystery) 


18.5 


22.7 15.9 

10:30pm 10:30pm 


10.2 

king-tT 
10:30pm 


19.5 5.5 

Wgn-tT cklW-tT 

9:30pm 9:00pm 


18.5 16.5 

ksd-tv wrc-tT 
10:00pm 10:30pm 


15.9 19.2 1 

10:30pm 7:00pm 9 t] 




Death Valley Days 

u.». borax i Western > 


18.8 


12.7 13.4 

wrca-tv krca-tx 
7:00pm 7:00pm 


25.7 


16.2 13.5 25.2 

9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 


15.2 17.7 16.5 

10:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 


18.5 20.9 19.9 l| 

HSb-tv wbz-tT wben-tT wi: 
7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7 t| 




Whirlybirds 

cbs (Adventure) 


17.3 


4.2 4.7 

7:00pm 7:30pm 


19.2 

komo-tv 


14.5 7.7 18.2 

9:00pm 11:00pm 9:30pm 


22.0 9.9 

10:00pm 7:00pm 


21.5 16.9 17.9 1 

wsb-tT wbz-tv wben-tv w j 
7:00pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 6 ^ 




U. S. Marshal 

st* (Western) 


16.8 


5.4 2.9 

7:00pm 7:00pm 


4.5 

6:30pm 


16.5 18.0 

9:00pm 10:30pm 


17.7 14.5 14.4 

10:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 


20.5 12.0 20.9 16.0 1 

10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 1C ' 




Lock Up 

«v (Drama) 


16.6 


6.2 12.4 


4.9 

10:00pm 


13.9 10.2 21.5 

10:00pm 7:30pm 9:30pm 


20.7 19.9 

9:30pm 7:00pm 


14.7 14.3 17.4 19.2 1 

wlw-a wbal-tr whdh-tT wgr-tv •' 
10:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10 




Shotgun Slade 

mca i Western i 


16.5 


11.6 


3.3 


9.5 14.4 

wgn-tv wwj-tv 
10:00pm 10:30pm 


11.2 13.2 

6:00pm 7:00pm 


10.7 18.3 19.2 14.5 

7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 




This Man Dawson 

ziv i Adventure I 


16.2 


4.7 4.4 

9:30pm 7:00pm 


11.5 

kiro 


14.2 10.2 15.5 

wgn-tT wjbk-tT kstp-tr 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 


20.4 16.5 10.5 

ksd-tv kpii-tv wtop-tT 
10:00pm 7:30pm 7:30pm 


14.7 17.7 19.5 ll 

6:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 1C 




Bold Venture 

* |V (Adventure) 


16.1 


12.3 9.8 

7 :00pm 9 :00pm 


19.4 

6:30pm 


11.5 8.5 

8:30pm 9:30pm 


14.2 19.5 16.2 

10 :0Opm 6:30pm 10:30pm 


15.9 15.8 11.2 16.9 It 

■rhr-a wbal-tT wbz-tv wgr-tr rri 
7:00pm 7:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10 ( 




Manhunt 

screen gems (Mystery) 


15.7 


5.6 9.7 

7 :30pm 7 :00pm 


17.4 


10.9 13.7 11.2 

wgn-tv nrjbk-tv kstp-tv 


15.2 19.7 

10:00pm 6:30pm 


16.0 13.0 19.0 1 

wsb-tv wmal-tT wgT-tT vj 
7:30pm 6:30pm 7:00pm 10 i 





Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 ma 


kets 


















. 


Coronado 9 
mca i Adventure 1 


18.1 


7.9 

7:00pm 




20.9 


17.2 

10:30pm 


Rendezvous 

cbs i Drama i 


17.6 






13.4 

10:00pm 


10.5 


20.2 25.2 

10:30pm 9:30pm j 


Cray Ghost 

cbs i Adventure' 


16.0 




9.5 


16.7 

7:00pm 


ll 

wk 


Grand Jury 

nta (Drama) 


15.1 


7.1 




15.4 


19.5 






13.3 


23.5 

10:30pm 


Little Rascals 

.NTERSTATE , MisC. ) 


14.7 


7.4 

6:00pm 


14.0 

khj-tT 




8.9 




Tombstone Territory 
wv (Western) 


14.5 


5.4 




9.5 15.5 


14.9 


20.2 

WgT-tT 

10:30pm 


Flight 

«' (Adventure) 


14.4 


4.6 




12.9 




7.9 

kmi-tT 


10.9 


i; 

10 


American Civil War 

westiwghouse ( Documentary ) 


14.2 






9.5 

kpix-tT 


16.3 16.9 

7:30pm 7:30pm 


Vikings 

uaa (Adventure) 


14.2 


5.2 


25.0 


18.7 


13.2 1 


State Trooper 
■- < 1 Adventure) 


13.3 


2.9 

10:00pm 


4.2 

khj-tv 






17.9 

kstp-tr 




7.0 

6:30pm 


10.9 


21.7 13.2 


Trackdown 

cbs (Western) 


13.3 


2.9 

10:00pm 


9.4 


17.5 




8.9 

kmsp-tr 
9:00pm 


10.5 

kgo 


9.2 

- 


11.5 


18.5 1 

10:30pm 1 



•In Washington Copter Patrol was used for Whirlybirds. 
Films listed are syndicated. M hr.. % hr. and hr. length, telecast In f. 
oadeasl in toll market 16-22 Dec.. 4-17 Ji 
much lesser extent with syndicated shows. This should be borne In mind 



more markeU. Tte arerage rating is an unweighted averag 
Vhile net shows are fairly stable from one month to anol 
when analyzing rating trends from one month to another 1: 



t ratings listed abore. Blank I 



Classification as t 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 ! 



LM SHOWS' 


3-STATION MARKETS 


2-STATION MARKETS 


Cd. 


Nil*. New Or. Phil*. 


Btrn. 


Dayton Prov. 


. ' bns-tr 


20.2 25.9 19.7 

9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


24.3 

9:30pm 


20.5 19.3 

10:30pm 7:00pm 


,28.2 

bns-tv 

0:30pm 


21.5 


29.8 

8:30pm 


;3K 


16.2 26.2 17.0 

9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


19.8 


26.8 21.5 

7:00pm 7:00pm 


':00pm 


18.3 25.2 13.9 

9:30pm 10:00pm 6:00pm 


32.3 

7 :3upm 


22.8 21.5 

7:30pm 7:00pm 


;2i.9 


10.5 17.9 19.5 

n-iti-tv wdsu-ty wfil-tv 
6:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 


33.3 


27.3 19.3 

7:00pm 10:30pm 


:;i4.5 

1 wlw-c 


16.2 23.2 16.9 

wisn-tv wwl-tv wrev-tv 
9:30pm 7:30pm 7:00pm 


29.0 


24.8 17.5 

10:30pm 7:00pm 




17.8 17.9 20.5 

•umj-ti WdSU-t? wrcv-tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 


26.8 


26.3 23.8 

whio-tv wjar-tv 


|24.2 

1 bns-tv 


11.2 20.5 18.2 

10:15pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 


20.3 

7:00pm 


27.3 22.3 

7:00pm 7:00pm 


5 :00pm 


13.7 19.0 24.2 

9:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 


22.5 

9:30pm 


21.3 

wlw-d 

10:30m 


ha 


19.7 20.4 

9:30pm 10:00pm 


20.3 

wapi-tv 


26.3 

7:00pm 


" 




19.9 

wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 


27.3 




18.9 

10:00pm 




I 
1 


20.8 

5 :00pm 


10.5 

i wlw-e 
0:30pm 






28.5 


9.9 

whr-e 
7:00pm 


20.8 

7 :00pm 




29.3 


19.3 

7:00pm 






6:00pm 




1 18.5 


23.5 

7:00pm 




31.5 


,Ws own. Pulse determines numb 
ally received by homes in the metro 
'eh station itseir may be outside me 

.SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 


I960 


ea of a given mar- 
area of the market 



YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 



DON'T USE KOLN-TV! 




a ld|| 



KOLN-TV DELIVERS THE 
MAXIMUM AUDIENCE IN NEBRASKA* 

Gunsmoke 98,000 homes 

Father Knows Best. . 86,500 homes 
6:00 p.m. News. . .84,400 homes 
10:00 p.m. News. .74,400 homes 



Hunt around Nebraska all you like: 
you'll find just two big television markets. 
One is in the extreme East where three 
top TV stations beckon to your budget. 

The other big market — Lincoln-Land — 
is acknowledged to be KOLN-TV country. 
with no serious challengers in sight. 
Latest Nielsen credits KOLN-TV with 
65,500 TV HOMES during prime 6 to 
9 p.m. viewing time. Compare this figure 
with that of ANY Omaha station! 

Avery-Knodel will give you all the 
facts on KOLN-TV— the Official Basic 
CBS Outlet for South Central Nebraska 
and Northern Kansas. 




KOLN-TV 

CHANNtt 10 • 316,000 WATTS • lOOO-FT. TOWD 
COVERS UNCOiN-LANO — NEBRASKA'S OTHt» tIG MARKET 




TELEVISION'S BICCEST ATTRACTION 

AT WAR WITH THE ARMY" 

starring 

MARTIN & LEWIS! 



Available to you for 
the biggest ratings ever! 



Ui A ALEXANDER PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



As more stations program 'good music', SPONSOR ASKS: 



How do you promote a 'good music' $ 



Station men agree soft-sell is im- 
portant in promoting 'good music' 
station. Here they discuss sales, 
promotion, and audience building 

Sol Hurwitz, director of promotion. 
WG\1S, Washington, D. C. 
"Good music" — defined for this 
purpose as "classical." "semi-classi- 
cal" and "show" music — can be en- 
joyed by everyone. Its appeal is uni- 




versal. Therefore, a station that pro- 
grams "good music" should take 
every opportunity to show its audi- 
ence — and its advertisers — that "clas- 
sical" music is fast becoming "popu- 
lar" and profitable. 

Concert managers and impresarios 
have long since realized the value of 
aggressive promotion to popularize 
their attractions. According to BMI. 
Americans continue to spend more 
money at the concert music box office 
than they do for baseball. The poten- 
tial audience is without limit. There 
is no reason why "good music" radio 
promotion cannot be directed at a 
mass audience and still be worthy of 
the musical product that is for sale. 

Everyone likes birthdays, holidays, 
dogs, and the first day of spring. 
These subjects lend themselves to 
program ideas that are highly promo- 
tional — "Beethoven's Birthday." "Mu- 
sic for Dog Da\s." "Hallowe'en Mu- 
and "Music for the Vernal 
Equinox." If you broadcast stereo, 
there are enormous promotional op- 
portunities for "Stereo Spectaculars." 
such as a complete stereophonic 
broadcast of the "Messiah" on Christ- 
\ : live concert broadcasts in 
Btereo; and local premieres of out- 
Btanding stereophonic recordings. 



A close rapport with musical or- 
ganizations — symphony, opera soci- 
ety, musical schools — will give vou 
many opportunities for publicity tie- 
ins i "WXXX will broadcast tonight's 
concert." I . adding to the cumulative 
effect of your call-letters' exposure. 

The program guide is one of your 
most effective promotional tools. A 
sizeable growth in subscriptions is. 
indeed, an indication that your listen- 
ing audience is growing. The guide's 
make-up should reflect the personal- 
ity of the station. Too often program 
guides are drab and lifeless. A lively 
sense of humor in cover art and edi- 
torial material will attract new sub- 
scribers and increase the rate of re- 
newals. An "arty" journal of musi- 
cal pedantrv can only limit your read- 
ers. When circulation reaches a re- 
spectable size, use the space for ad- 
vertising but keep ads "clean" and 
consistent in size. Free ads should 
reward the advertisers whose billings 
are substantial. 

Don't forget the people in your 
own "family" — especially your sales 
staff and your national representa- 
tives. Everv news item, staff change, 
or printed piece that you publish will 
give them a clearer picture of your 
identitv as a "good music" station, and 
will help them to produce the sales 
that keep "good music" on-the-air. 

Thomas P. Chisman, president and 
gen. mgr. WVEC radio/ti\ Norfolk; la. 
You might say that "good music" is 
its own best promotion and probably 
accomplishes more to create an audi- 
ence than any amount of publicity or 
promotion. But. like most things that 
are worth spreading the word about. 
it takes a great deal of time for the 
word of mouth publicity about a good 
music station to have sufficient effect 
on the tvpe and numbers of people 
who are addicted to good music. 

Consequently at WVEC we use a 
variety of media including newspaper 
ads and billboards to promote our 
"good music" schedules. ^ e use a 
prestige approach in all our adver- 



tising as to the type of music we 
program and the type of audience for 
which we program. 

However, our main promotional 
efforts for our good music station are 
of the educational variety. One of the 
prime targets for our educational ex- 
periments in instituting a taste for 
good music are the teenagers. We 
realize that during their high school 
days they probably don't dig our 
programing. However, the teens 
don't last very long and we feel that 
if we can instill at least a feeling of 
interest in them at the start, when 
their tastes change as they become 
mature, we stand a good chance of 
creating a "good music" fan. 

To promote the WVEC type of pro- 
graming in these areas we advertise in 
the local high school papers to intro- 
duce the kids to our "good music" 
concept. We infiltrate — and I use the 
word advisedly — the teen-age sock 
hops by supplving the clubs, schools, 
church groups and other teen organi- 
zations with rock 'n roll records. In- 
asmuch as we don't use any rock "n 
roll on W\ EC we have an abundant 
supply to furnish these groups. We 
also supply them with some good 
standard records and the only stipu- 
lation is that thev use some of the 
standards as well as rock 'n roll stuff 
This has been an effective way" tc 
introduce them to worthwhile music. 




Promoting a station such as \^ > EC 
into an influential good music sta 
tion has not been easy but it bar 
been done, and the type of audience 
that a station such as ours deliver 
cannot be matched for loyalty or buy 
ing power. And these are two bi: 
factors that have paid off handsomeb 
for our station's advertisers. 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 190 







station? 



Dickens J. Wright, president, WPAT, 
Paterson, N. J. 
don't think it is possible to view 
'promotion as an entity in itself, as 
something separate and apart from 



Promote with 
consistent 
"good music' 



'the many elements which together 
Create a successful good music sta- 
tion. I consider it inseparable from 
the whole; very much a part of good 
programing and the consonant com- 
mercial policies which make good 
[programing possible. And so I would 
say that the first and most important 
.step in the promotion of a good 
music station is consistent good music 
programing. For a station is, to the 
listener, only its sound, and on it, will 
succeed or fail. You can "promote/' 
' advertise, spend hundreds of hours 
'and thousands of dollars, but the final 
test is in that initial twist of the dial 
when the listener first tunes you in. 
If he doesn't like what he hears, it 
isn't likely that he'll stay. 

If you have consistent "good music" 
programing and consonant commer- 
cial policies you will have an audi- 
ence and if you have your audience, 
your major promotion job is done 
for the audience attracted to a good 
music station is a stable one. Equally 
important, you have an audience that 
believes in your station and buys the 
' | products advertised on your station. 
There remains for your sales promo- 
Mtion one important job: to quietly 
fj claim the attention you have earned. 
j| The best promotion is the most 
; j honest reflection of your station. It 
fjcan be no more and no less than a 
fj mirroring of your station's "image," 
[] the visual symbol of your station's 
sound. To do this, it must relate di- 
rectly and at all times to the whole. 
(Please turn to page 97) 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



Throughout the World 

A famous name for QUALITY is 



ROCHESTER'S 



EASTMAN KODAK 




Intricate c 
Kodak's Apparatus and Optical Div 



In the vital ROCHESTER, N. Y. area 

The QUALITY 
Radio Station is . . . 




AM -TV 



BASIC CBS ROCHESTER 



REPRESENTATIVES: EVERETT McKINNEV, INC. 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES . SAN FRANCISCO 



Five years and ^^^ 
1,250 telecasts later, 




this program is still unsold " ^Al^^w^T/, 



(That's the way we want it.) 



Some programs become "public service" be- 
cause they can't be sold. Others become 
salable because they render genuine serv- 
ice. wiSH-Tv's Farm & Home Program is in the 
latter category. Because commercial sponsorship 
might create problems for its participants, the 
program is "sold" only to its audience. 

Since 1955, for five days a week from 1 : 1 5 to 
1 :30 p.m., the Marion County Agricultural 
Agent, or the County Home Economist, or 
faculty members of Purdue's agricultural exten- 
sion service, or assorted combinations of agents, 
economists, professors and 4-H Clubbers, have 
gathered at wish-tv to inform and entertain an 
impressive— and impressed— audience (38.4share 
in an important 4-station metropolitan market). 



What goes on? A turf prof, has held forth on 
improving the breed— of turf. Flower-arranging 
produced many requests for instructions— and 
the station never smelled so good. Cookie deco- 
rating sat well with our audience (1,500 requests) 
and staff (57 cookies demolished). The work of 
county agents, Purdue University extension serv- 
ices, 4-H clubs and other organizations, is 
widely publicized. Without stars, without arti- 
fice, the Farm & Home Program is wholesome, 
straightforward— and deep in the affection of 
its viewers. 

The program serves. That's the Corinthian 
key to good community relations. We suggest that 
viewer confidence so built may help establish a 
receptive atmosphere for our clients' commercials. 

Responsibility in Broadcasting 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 19(1 



KOTV 

Tulsa (H-R) 



KHOU-TV 

Houston (cbs-tv Spot Sales) 



KXTV 

Sacramento (H-R) 



WANE-TV 

Fort Wayne (H-R) 



WISH-TV 

Indianapolis (H-R) 



WANE-AM 

Fort Wayne (H-R) 



WISH-AM 

Indianapolis (H-R) 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



RADIO BUYS 

Champion Spark Plug Co., Toledo: Campaign for its spark plugs 
kicks off this month for seven weeks in about 45 markets. Traffic- 
minutes are being used primarily, frequency probably around 17-18 
spots per week per market. Buyer: Bob Gorby. Agency: J. Walter 
Thompson Co., New York. 

Drug Research Corp., New York: Introducing in Southern markets 
this month Posi-Tan for women, following its success with Man-Tan. 
Day minutes of varying frequencies are being bought. Buyer: Beryl 
Seidenberg. Agency: Kastor, Hilton, Chesley & Clifford, New York. 
Tidewater Oil Co., Eastern Div., New York: Going into Eastern 
markets with a short campaign for Flying-A gasolines. I.D.'s are 
being scheduled for two weeks, frequencies depending on market. 
Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding, Los Angeles. 

TV BUYS 

Standard Brands Incorporated, New York: Schedules start this 
month in about 38 markets on Chase & Sanborn regular coffees. Run 
is for four weeks using prime time I.D.'s, light frequencies. Buyer: 
Carrie Senatore. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 
Colorforms, Inc., Norwood, N. J.: Supplementing Captain Kan- 
garoo schedule with spots in kids shows for its boxed construction 
toys. Announcements start 15 April in a number of top markets, 
average three to four per week per market. Buyer: Mai Murray. 
Agency: Kudner Agency, New York. 

Block Drug Co., Inc., Jersey City: New activity on Polident begins 
late this month in 15-20 markets. Schedules are for seven weeks, 
day and late night minutes. Buyer: Allan Reed. Agency: Grey 
A.A., New York. 

Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich.: Day and fringe night minutes 
and 20's are being scheduled in several Midwestern markets to test 
Handiwrap, a new transparent wrapping paper. Campaign is for an 
indefinite period. Buyer: Inez Aimee. Agency: Norman, Craig 8 
Kummel, New York. 

American Chicle Co., Long Island City, N. Y. : About 10 markets 
pick up nighttime minutes for Dentyne Gum. Run starts this month 
for 13 weeks. Buyers: Frank McHugh and Bill Keeler. 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. New York. 
Franwill Industries, Indianapolis: Spending $250,000 
147 markets to promote its new freeze-at-home popsicle. Pic-A-Pop. 
Bulk of the budget is going into shows with kid appeal, and sched- 
ules of 60's start for 13 weeks from mid-April on a staggered 
basis. Buyer: Walter Bagot. Agency: Randall & Bogat, Indianapolis. 



55 



Capsule case histories of success^ 
local and regional radio campaim 



^ RADIO RESULTS 



FOREIGN CARS 

SPONSOR: Mountcastle Import Motors AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: When Mountcastle Motors, Nash- 
ville's first car import dealer, switched to handling the Fiat 
exclusively, it relinquished five established foreign car lines 
to other dealers. Thus it found itself in the position of com- 
peting with the market it had built up itself for these cars 
over an eight-year period. The first few months 75% of 
sales were outside of the Nashville area due to backing of 
some locally based insurance companies, but it was impor- 
tant to develop local sales too. Local newspapers failing, it 
tried to spot schedule on WKDA five days before Nashville's 
auto Sale-O-Rama — in which the dealer did not participate. 
Result: 14 cars were sold. Since then, using radio has re- 
sulted in an average of 40 cars a month being sold in Nash- 
ville. Now the No. 1 dealer in the South, local sales account 
for 65% of volume. Most of the advertising budget is in 
radio, and Mountcastle has a TFN contract with WKDA. 
WKDA, Nashville Announcements 



WORK CLOTHES 

SPONSOR: William-Dickie Manufacturing Co., AGENCY: Direct 

B&J Department Store 
Capsule case history: The Williamson-Dickie Manufactur- 
ing Co., Fort Worth, manufacturers of work and casual 
clothes, had a problem in introducing its "Guaranteed Work 
Pants" to the Asheville, N. C, area. W-D wanted to get its 
line carried by the B&J Department Store, and offered the 
store co-op money for a radio campaign. One hundred spots 
were placed on WISE, Asheville, partly e.t.'s and partly live. 
"We started in February trying to sell the highest-priced 
work clothes B&J ever sold," Lloyd Prichard of W-D re- 
ported. "With business at the lowest ebb of the year in 
Asheville, we honestly didn't expect much in the way of 
retail sales. We were content to think we could tell the 
Dickie story to future buyers of work clothes." However, to 
W-D's surprise, sales skyrocketed, and the store came up 
with L65% reorders on the basic stock. "The results were 
outstanding, and we certainly plan to move more merchan- 
dise on WISE," Prichard said. "It opened the market to us." 
W [SE, \sheville Announcements 



56 



FOOD MARKETS 

SPONSOR: Boy's Market AGENCY 

Capsule case history: Boy"s Market food stores ran a t 
scheduled on KFWB, and made it as difficult as possible 
a station to pass. During the 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. period 
a Wednesday, it ran announcements of a banana speci 
No other advertising was used to make sure of ihe accun 
of the test, and the only way a listener could take advanti 
of the special price was to mention KFWB at the check) 
counter. Spots were scheduled for only one day and 
teners had to take advantage of the sale on the same dj 
Immediate impact was necessary for the advertising to prJ 
itself and it did with phenomenal results. One Boy's Man 
store alone reported that 300 people had mentioned KF! 
going through the checkout counter. The client was ^ 
satisfied with sales produced by the test, and felt 
KFWB's d.j. personalities gave the one-day campaign 
impetus it needed in the competitive Los Angeles marl 
KFWB, Los Angeles Announcem 



MUSIC STORES 

SPONSOR: Walker's Music Store AGENCY: Dl 

Capsule case history: Walker's Music Store, Omaha, wH 
sells records, radios and phonographs, placed a two] 
weekend schedule on KBON to promote its record ded 
ment. No other radio advertising was used. Schedule " 
for twenty 30-second spots on Friday, 15 on Saturday. Si 
pitched a sale on all long-playing albums at $3.09, and 
r.p.m. single record or album for one cent when purch 
with another single record or album at regular price, 
suits: Over 1,200 customers bought records in the store 
first day alone, and total sales increased many times ov 
normal weekend not only on records, but on radios 
phonographs as well. "For the purpose of planning fn 
promotions we tried, as best as we could, to measure a< 
tising," Store owner Jack Walker reported. "We'd say s 
out of 10 people heard about the sale on radio. Cert; 
the bulk of our advertising budget will go to KBON ii 
future. We know how effectively it reaches Oma 

KBON, Omaha Announcet 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL l'l 



Audience Profile #6 




331,034 WWDC housewives 

are in the prime buying 

age group of 25 to 49— 

17.5% above the total sample 

Washington, D.C. average.* 

A most pleasing "ymmg to 

middle-aged spread" for you! 



* PULSE Audience Image Study— July, 1959 




WWDC 

. . . the station that keeps people in mind 

WASHINGTON, D.C— REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



And in growing Jacksonville, Fla. — it's WWDC-owned Radio WMBR 



2 APRIL 1960 




the HOTTEST radio station in St. Louis 



(U 




STILL NO. 1 



PULSE and HOOPER 



J 



\ 



the HOTTEST radio buy in St. Louis 



vice president: 
William L. Jones, Jr. 



*JAN.-FEB. '60 



National Rep: 
HEADLEY REED 



f 




SPONSOR 



THE MAGAZINE R Al 



ADVERTISERS USI 



■ ■ 




the 
lion's 
share 

■ 

in 
Aarch 


ABC-TV 


20.8 




ZUill 


JET Z 





ABC TELEVISIONS 

ce: Nielsen 24-Market TV Report, average audience, 7 nights, 8-10:30 PM, average for 4 weeks ending March 20, I960. 



NAB CONVENTION SPECIAL 






wheel of fortune 



FUTUR50MC PRODUCTIOflS, inc. PRESEHTS 








TAKE TIME TO MAKE MONEY. ..WITH TIME CHEX, ANOTHER FIRST FROM FUTURSONIC! FUTURSONIC PRODUCTIONS HAS CREATED WHAtl 
REPRESENTS A FIRST IN MEDIA PRODUCTION. THE FABULOUS TIME CHEX — 145 TIME BREAKS IN MUSICAL JINGLE FORM. THESE ARE NOV 
MERELY "STOCK" TUNES OR TIME SIGNALS, BUT MUSICAL JINGLES GIVING THE SPECIFIC TIME EVERY FIVE MINUTES OF EVERY HOUR ol 
THE FIVE MINUTE MARK — 1:05, 1:10, 1:15, ETC.-24 HOURS AROUND THE CLOCK. ■ NOW, HERE'S HOW THE TIME CHEX CAN MAKE MONE] 
FOR YOU: OFFER THEM AS CAMEO PROGRAMS TO YOUR LOCAL ACCOUNTS . . . PARTICULARLY, PRESTIGE ACCOUNTS SUCH AS BANKSH 
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS, AND THE LIKE. THE LONGEST JINGLE IS ONLY 8 SECONDS IN LENGTH, SO THERE'S PLENTY OF TImI 
FOR COMMERCIAL COPY. THE LOCAL ADVERTISER GETS TOP NOTCH PRODUCTION AND YOUR STATION GETS A NEW EXCLUSIVE PROMOTION 
AND INCREASED BILLING! ■ BUT, WHETHER YOU USE THE TIME CHEX AS A DIRECT REVENUE BUILDER OR AS A STATION PROMOTIONaI 
IDEA, PLEASE ACT PROMPTLY! THIS MATERIAL IS SOLD ON AN EXCLUSIVE BASIS TO ONLY ONE STATION IN EACH MARKET! WHILE A| 
THE N. A. B. VISIT THE FUTURSONIC HOSPITALITY SUITE AND AUDITION THIS AND OTHER OUTSTANDING STATION PROMOTIONaJ 
MATERIAL. ■ NEWEST TIME CHEX USERS: CHICAGO-WJJD/PITTSBURGH-WEEP/CINCINNATI-WSAI/BOSTON-WCOP/SAN ANTONIO-KOmT 
MONTREAL, CANADA-CKGM. THE SOUNDS OF TOMORROW. ..TODAY. FUTURSONIC PRODUCTIONS, INC. Rl 8-9525.3101 ROUTH -DALLAS, TEXAS 



SPONSOR'S 

NAB CONVENTION ISSUE 

This special issue is dedicated to 
HAROLD E. FELLOWS 






Index to SPONSOR' 


s Convention 


Special 


• 


Harold E. Fellows - 






Page 


4 












• 


An Industry in Action 






Page 


6 












• 








Page 


10 












• 


What the Film Syndicators 


in 


Shoiving 


Page 


12 



• Equipment Exhibitors Page 25 



'ONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 CONVENTION SPECIAL 3 • 61 



HAROLD E. FELLOWS 



Leadership, therefore, in a world so fashioned requires 
unusual qualities of patience, forbearance and firmness." 

When Harold Everett Fellows spoke these words last year, 
at the opening of the 37th annual NAB Convention, he was 
referring to the kind of leadership which he urged on all 
broadcasters, large and small, in today's complex world. 

But few descriptions apply more perfectly to the qualities 
which Hal himself brought to his arduous and doubly respon- 
sible job as president and board chairman of the NAB. 

Unusual patience, unusual forbearance, unusual firmness 
— Hal had them all — and broadcasting is stronger today be- 
cause this tough-fibered New Englander was willing to give 
his last full measure of devotion to the industry he loved. 
His death, of course, was a soldier's death. 
Everyone who knows the tremendous physical and nervous 
pressures under which Hal Fellows worked, the mounting 
problems and critical Washington climate which were his 
daily and unremitting fare, recognizes that he literally laid 
down his life for the cause. 

Under such circumstances, it was scarcely surprising that 
the news of Hal's passing brought both a sense of shock and 
a sense of shame to his many friends in the industry. 

It seemed to most of us that we had asked more than any 
one has any right to ask of any man. 

Yet Hal Fellows, himself, would have been the first to 
deny this. In his NAB Convention speech last year he said: 

'"So long as there are human beings there will be human 
struggle — a never-ending search for self improvement, a 
never-ending hope that one generation might foster a more 
pleasant prospect for the next." 

Harold Everett Fellows lived and worked and fought and 
died \Nith this hope. And his dream was always "the future 
glory and service of this great system of broadcasting."' 
\\ <■ owe it to Hal to make hi- dream come true. ^ 



62 • 4 com EH rlOH >n < i u. 



AN 
INDUSTRY 

IN 

ACTION 



tWmuch has been made of the frailties of the broadcast 
industry, little of its virtues. 

What is the true measure of the industry}' Hon respon- 
sive is it to the need for reform? Does it face up to its 
responsibilities? Does it represent a force for good? 

The broadcast business has been so mauled and battered 
in recent months that it is virtually impossible for most 
people to get a proper perspective. We've asked broad- 
casters, advertisers, legislators, regulators to give us their 
impressions of what's being done by the industry to 
ansuer its critics. We get nothing but blurred answers. 

For the benefit of the foregoing, and others, sponsor 
presents AN INDUSTRY IN ACTION, a concise chrono- 
logical wrap-up of the more important constructive ac- 
tions, considerations, and recommendations made bv the 
industry during the last six months. We leave it to you 
to draw your own conclusions. 






^JOctober 1959— House Commil 
on Legislative Oversight opens Wa 
ington hearings on quiz show fix: 

This date, less than six months a| 
marked the real beginning of the i 
called "radio tv scandals" and 
period of anti-industry criticism, M 

As disclosures to the Harris 
mittee captured headline space 
newspapers and other print meJ 
all branches of the industry mo" 
promptly to take necessarv hoi 
cleaning steps. Here is the recor f 
each of the major groups. 

1. The NAB Record 

16 October 1959— NAB Presil 
Harold E. Fellows announces that! 
industry's own self-regulatory ] 
is prepared to set up additional J 
guards in the NAB Tv Code if nA 
sarv to prevent quiz show ri2Lj 

N \B Tv Code Review Board Clf 
man Donald H. McGannon annouj 
he will propose amending the <1 
at the next Board meeting to "I 



64 • 6 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



EDITORIAL 



So much — not so little 



|n the 1950's a dynamic new force cata- 
pulted into the lives of practically every 
man, woman and child in America. It revo- 
lutionized their living habits, changed their 
outlooks, opened up new vistas on the world, 
and on themselves. 

Television accomplished all this in an 
incredibly brief span. And the industry 
which wrought the miracle resembled a 
roaring mining camp during that turbulent 
time. There was no opportunity for careful 
planning, no chance for refinements. All 
the pressure was for growth and expansion. 

The wonder is that the television industry 
could do so much so well and so soon. 



But it was inevitable that someday tele- 
vision would have to stop, tear down some 
of its hastily built shacks and rebuild on a 
more permanent basis. That day came, 
forcibly, with the quiz scandals, the attacks 
on programing and commercial practices. 

Now the broadcasting industry is build- 
ing better. And uncomfortable as the pres- 
ent period may be, thoughtful industry 
leaders welcome this opportunity to take 
stock, clean up, and establish the industry 
on more solid foundations. 

The record speaks for itself. 



Ibit an abuse of the public accept- 
lf ice and trust." 

li October— NAB President Fel- 

i) ws, speaking before the Atlanta 

I ons Club, says "The seriousness of 

Am matter is self-evident and has 

t;en candidly acknowledged by our 

industry's leaders. We have said 

hi at we will seek to insure, through 

ile self-regulatory processes of our 

m standards of good practice . . . 

at such an incident will not take 

ace again. We will do this." 

■)':10 November — Fellows emphasizes 

3 11 broadcasters that strict adherence 

i J the Code is the "salvation" for the 

|ipe American system of broadcast - 

n-g. He adds, "I have heard it said 

jjat the 'entire industry' is not re- 

rionsible in this case and should not 

Jj held responsible. No matter how 

\m may feel about this deplorable 

ircumstance, I submit that the en- 

je industry is responsible, by the 

jONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



very terms of the license under which 
it operates." 

18 November— NAB Tv Code Re- 
view Board, at close of its two-day 
Los Angeles meeting, announces it 
has framed amendments in both the 
advertising and programing sections 
of the Code which it will present to 
the NAB Tv Board for approval. 

In a tape-recorded, closed-circuit 
telecast to the nation's tv stations, 
carried by all three networks, the Tv 
Code Board makes a strong appeal 
for 100% Code membership and ad- 
herence. 

27 November — Code Board Chair- 
man McGannon, in a letter to Sen. 
Warren Magnuson, answers in detail 
questions about the effectiveness of 
self-regulation. He says, "I believe 
without reservation that the Tv Code 
can and will work . . . the Code can 
be the broadcasters' version of the 
Canons of Legal Ethics and prove, in 



turn, an efficient basis of self-regula- 
tion." 

4 December— The NAB Tv Board 
approves new Code provisions to pro- 
tect the public from rigged quiz 
shows, deceptive advertising and 
"payola." 

9 December— NAB President Fel- 
low appoints a 12 man task force of 
broadcasting executives and NAB 
staff members to deal with legal and 
ethical issues facing tv and radio. 

14 December — Task force holds its 
first meeting, reports that 302 tv sta- 
tions are subscribers to the Tv Code, 
an increase of 12% in one mont!: 

16 December— NAB Stanc 1 
Good Practices Committee 
mends that teeth be put 
untary code of condi 
tion's radio broad:. md sug- 

gests industrv enforcement powers. 

4 January 1960— The NAB Radio 
Board approves an -ndments, by bal- 

CONYENTIOX SPECIAL 7 • 65 



loting, to the Standards of Good 
Practice for Radio Broadcasters to 
guard against "payola" and other de- 
ceptive practices. 

5 January — NAB announces 372 
of the country's 518 operating tv sta- 
tions are now subscribers to the Tv 
Code. 

26 January — President Fellows, in 
testimony before the FCC, warns 
against government control of radio/ 
tv programs as more dangerous to the 
American people than to broadcast- 
ers themselves. He says such con- 
trol would tend to limit programs to 
the "choice of the few" rather than 
the desires of the many." 

5 February — E. K. Hartenbower, 
Tv Code Review Board member, 
pledges continuing cooperation of 
the Board with networks, stations, 
FTC, FCC, Better Business Bureaus 
and advertisers to "stamp out any 
commercial deception" on the air. 

24 February — Conference of Presi- 
dents of State Broadcaster Associa- 
tions unanimously adopts resolutions 
opposing governmental control of 
programing, and requiring that ad- 
vertising copy must conform to the 
NAB Codes. 

4 March — Tv Code Review Board 
recommends to the NAB Tv Board 
that Code activities and staff be ex- 
panded. 

10 March — NAB Radio Board 
votes to allow stations, not members 
of the NAB, to subscribe to the 



Standards of Good Practices for Ra- 
dio Broadcasters. 

Radio Board also approves in prin- 
ciple recommendations to put teeth 
into the enforcement of Good Prac- 
ices Standards, which had been op- 
erated on an honor system basis. En- 
orcement procedures to be worked 
out by the Standards of Good Prac- 

e Committee and NAB staff. 

10 March— NAB Tv Board en- 
larges the Code Review Board from 
five to seven members. E. K. Harten- 
bower named Chairman of expanded 
Code Board. 

New Code Review Board Office to 
be opened in New York, and person- 
nel and activities of the Code's Wash- 
ington and Hollywood offices to be 
expanded. 

11 March— NAB Board of Direc- 
tors votes to continue the Task Force 
set up to aid in preparing testimonv 
and setting strategy in regulatory and 
legislative matters affecting the in- 
dustry. 

21 March— NAB's three-man Pol- 
icy Committee, appointed to carry- 
out the Association's policy functions 
following the death of President Fel- 
lows, acts on FCC interpretation of 
Sponsor Identification requirements. 

Committee directs NAB staff to file 
a petition with the FCC to stay the 
effectiveness of the Commission's 
public notice, pending rule making 
proceedings. 

Involved are many established in- 



dustry practices which "fall entirely 
within the business field of station 
operations." 

2. The Network Record 

Paralleling NAB actions during th« 
six months since the Harris Commit 
tee began hearings have been 
energetic activities of the tv network? 

Most of these have centered at CBS 
and NBC. None of the quiz show 
under fire were scheduled on AB( 
TV, and this network has refraine< 
from instituting new policies, regu 
lations and personnel changes on th 
same scale as its competitors. 

On the matter of program respons; 
bility, however, ABC TV has take 
substantiallv the same stand as NB' 
TV and CBS TV. 

On 1 February I960, ABC T 
President Oliver Treyz, testifying In 
fore the FCC, stated, "ABC assume 
full responsibility for any materia 
broadcast over its facilities, and 
deception exists in any prograi 
broadcast by us, regardless of tH 
source from which it is obtained, it 
our responsibility to see that thi 
deception is eliminated before th| 
programing reaches the America! 
public." 

At CBS, reactions to the quiz prj 
gram disclosures produced radic 
changes in program policies and pr 
cedures. A summary of the Cq 
moves follows : 

16 October — Dr. Frank Stanto 



Five of the top 

Industry Leaders 

who have sparked 

reforms for tv 

and advertising 

in recent months 




Donald H. McGannon 

Chairman, Tv Code Review Board 



Dr. Frank Stanton 

President. CBS 



66 • 8 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 19 



esident of CBS, speaking in New 
rleans before the Radio Television 
ews Directors Association, an- 
junces that network will no longer 
irry programs whose "major appeal 
' the winning by contestants of large 
ims of money or lavishly expensive 
•izes." 

' Result of the CBS decision is the 
Wioval of five and a half hours of 
'tonsored programs per week, some 
5ghly rated. 

"6 November — Stanton, testifying 
; ;fore the House Committee on Leg- 
'lative Oversight, says "We have not 
)ne all we should have done," re- 
ikis that drop of big money game 
jiows was only the first step in for- 
'ulating "new general rules covering 
1 program areas in order to assure 
at programs will be exactly what 
ley apear to be." 
CBS President also announces new 
tudy of problem of objectionable 
mmercials. 

J 13 November — CBS receives confi- 
:ntial proposal (given also to NBC 
hd ABC) by Sig Larmon, board 

t airman of Young and Rubicam, 
lich calls for "Joint Committee of 
distinguished Citizens to study tv, 

id suggest reforms. 

16 November — Stanton, replying to 
iirmon, turns down proposal. Says, 
We think that television must, itself, 
ean its own house. . . . Matters 
rictly our responsibility must be 
bait with by us alone. In discharge 



of this duty I can assure you we are 
moving along as rapidly as we can." 

NOTE: ABC TV also turned down 
the Larmon proposal. NBC TV ac- 
cepted it, but withdrew acceptance 
after Larmon declared the plan could 
not work except with three-network 
support. 

17 November — James T. Aubrey, 
Jr., president of CBS TV announces 
new program regulations governing 
stricter standards for game and con- 
test shows, announcements of pre- 
rehearsals of interview and discus- 
sion programs, and announcements 
specifying when all or any part of a 
program is pre-recorded. Included 
in the new regulations is the so called 
"canned laughter" provision for la- 
belling such laughter as "technically 
produced" or technically augmented." 

30 November — Stanton issues new 
policy statement to CBS employees 
covering "certain aspects of commer- 
cial bribery and payola." Policy for- 
bids acceptance or payment of "any- 
thing of value" to influence business 
or program decisions. 

30 November — Sig Mickelson, pres- 
ident CBS News, issues counterpart 
to Aubrey memo, explaining applica- 
tion of new rules to radio and tv 
programs produced by CBS News. 

2 December — Joseph H. Ream, 
newly appointed v.p. in charge of 
Program Practices, announces new 
CBS policies governing credits and 
identifications. Regulations forbid 



credits to manufacturers or suppliers 
of prizes or gifts, and other identifi- 
cation of manufacturers or brand 
names "except where reasonably 
necessary for the interest, reality, or 
suitability of program content. 

14 December — V.p. Ream outlines 
working procedures and standard an- 
nouncements to implement new pro- 
gram regulations. 

29 January 1960 — Stanton, testify- 
ing before the FCC, outlines new 
plans for information, cultural and 
educational programs on CBS. Also 
explains CBS rules governing "adver- 
tiser participation" in programing. 
(No participation in news, documen- 
taries and other programs dealing 
with public affairs; limited partici- 
pation in serious dramatic shows.) 

3 March — V.p. Ream announces 
new standards governing acceptance 
of commercials on CBS TV. Special 
rules set for commercials on news 
programs, and for promotion of 
headache and cold remedies, antacids, 
bathroom tissues, foundation gar- 
ments, laxatives and other personal 
products. 

3 March — Herbert A. Carlborg, 
CBS Director of Program Practices 
announces new regulations govern- 
ing position of commercials in news 
and entertainment programs. Limita- 
tions set on number of times main 
body of program may be interrupted, 
{Please turn to page 78) 




CONVENTION SPECIAL 9 • 67 



THE MAJOR CONVENTION SUITES 

(Li-.| may be incomplete because of additions and changes which were made after presstime. 



NETWORKS 

ABC Radio &Ti 



CH 2320-2325 

CBS Radio & Spot Radio CH 1 806 

CBS TV CH 2305A-2306A 

Keystone Bdcstg. System ____C H 804, 805, 806 
Mutual Bdcstg. System CH 2306 Skyway Suite 

NBC Radio & Tv Bl 508 Presid'l Suite 

NT A Film Network Bl 

Storer Broadcasting Co. CH 1005 A 

Westinghouse C H 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Sh 

BM 108-09 
..EH 2508 



Ambassador East 
Drake 



Am Radio Sales 

Avery-Knodel 

E. M. Beckjorden 

Charles Bernard 

John Blair 

Blair Tv Assoc. Drake 

Boiling CH 1100 

Branham C H 

CBS TV Spot Sales 

Henry I. Christal CH 1306 

Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. EH 2704 

Everett-McKinney EH 281 1 

Forjoe & Co Congress 

Gill-Perna CH 1300 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons Bl 709 

Headier-Read CH 700 

George P. Hollingbery CH 1 600 

Hal Holman C H 1 023 

Bernard Howard & Co CH 

H-R Reps EH 3510-1 1-12 

Katz Agency EH 3803 

Jack Masla Co., Inc. CH 

Daren F. McGavren Co EH 

The Meeker Co., Inc CH 1700 



National Tv Station Reps. 

NBC Tv Spot Sales 

NBC Radio Spot Sales __ 
John E. Pearson _ 



...CH 1218A 

Bl 

Bl 
EH 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. Bl 

Edward Petry CH 1400-01 

Radio-Tv Reps. CH 1 105A-1 106A 

Paul H. Raymer EH 3704 

TvAdv. Reps Drake 



Tv Stations, Inc. CH 2022A-2023, 

Venard, Rintoul & McConnell CH 210* 

Walker-Rewalt Co., Inc. 

Grant Webb _ ... C 

Adam Young CH 220 



RESEARCH - PROMOTION 

Amer. Research Bureau CH 9C 

BAR CH 718 

Community Club Services CH 21 C 

C. E. Hooper 

A. C. Nielsen CH 10C 

Pulse.1 CH 21 06 



TRADE ASSOCIATIONS 

RAB CH 1 51 

TvB CH 8 

TIO CH 81S 



MUSIC -RADIO SERVICES 

ASCAP 



Harry S. Goodman 
Jingle Mill - 



CH 1105A-1KX 



Lang-Worth Feature Programs CH 25 

Charles Michelson 

Programatic Bdcstg. Service _ 
SESAC 



World Broadcasting System . 

NEWS SERVICES 

AP 



... CH ( 

.CH 12041 
CH IS 



Radio Press _ 
UPI 



* Hotels are abbreviated as follows: CH, Conrad Hill 
Bl, Sheraton-Blackstone; EH, Executive House; 
Sheraton 



10 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



"Metropolitan" 4 4* y 

personality... ^■h^ iv 




More and more people are better informed and better entertained 
through spending time with a "Metropolitan" personal^ 
a personality like each of our widely-recognized proper 
I METROPOLITAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



^ f > - » 



WHO'S WHO IN FILM AT NAB 



^ These syndication men will attend the convention to call attention to their new 
programs and repeat play availabilities, plus feature films and cartoon offerings i 



•^^yndicators will have hospitality 
suites at the NAB convention this 
\ t ir, following the pattern which be- 
gan i.i L959. 

Gone for a second year are the 
signs <>f showmanship which termi- 
nated in 1958 — at the invitation of 
the NAB itself. But film men will 
still attract considerable interest with 
their personal presence en masse plus 
a display of new and recent products. 

The total amount of new product 
to be seen this year will be below the 
level of previous seasons simply be- 
cause less new products are being 
made. But several new programs will 
be seen, as well as a number that 



have been introduced in the past few 
weeks. 

Probably CBS Films will have 
more new shows than any other syn- 
dicator. It will have these three: 
Brothers Branigan, Rogue For Hire, 
and Deputy Dawg. Recent product 
at the convention will include Ziv's 
Home Run Derby, ITC's Interpol 
Calling and Sweet Success, and 
NTA's Assignment Underwater. 

If any programing vogue can be 
predicted for this year's convention, 
it may be the revival of short chil- 
dren's animations. There has been 
fresh interest in production of this 
type, and it is of specific interest to 



stations, since it is intended for inte- I 
gration within local children's pro- 
grams which stations schedule arounoB 
live hosts. 

There may also be more interest 
this year in off-network reruns andffl 
in syndication repeats than in pasfl 
seasons. This is traditionally an im- I 
portant activity for stations and synll 
dicators. It may receive more attenfl 
tion in the partial eclipse of new 
products. 

Theatrical products released for tn 
will also play a part in this year a 
convention activities. Several distribflj 
utors will be considering feature filmsjl 
cartoons and short subjects. ^fl 



ABC FILM SYNDICATION CH 170506 

1501 Broadway 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Henry G. Plltt. 
pres.; Howard Anderson, v.p. sis.; William Clark, v.p. West, div.j Stan 
Smith, East. div. mgr.; Richard C. Hurley, cent, div mgr.; Mike Gould, 
regional sis. mgr. cent, div.; John MacMahon, sis. rep. 

HIGHLIGHTS: This year ABC Film Syndication convention 
items will include many of their well-known film series. Such 
shows as People's Choice with Jackie Cooper and Frank Lovejoy 
in Meet McGraw will be presented. Adventures of Jim Bowie, 
( ourt m Last Resort and 26 Men will also be on the program. 



CBS-TV FILM 

545 Madison Ave 
New York City 



CH 231916 



REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Sam Cook Diggs, 
adm. v.p.; Robert Lewine, v.p. programs; Fred Mahlstedt, dir. of oper. 
dom. and intl.; James Victory, acct. supvr.; James McCormick, acct. 
supvr.; Walter Scanlon, mgr. merchandising; Henry T. Gillespie, mgr. 
Chi. off.; William Perkinson, mgr. L.A.; James Throsh, mgr. Atlanta; 
George Diederick, mgr. St. Louis; H. Roy Marks, mgr. Boston; Edward 
Hewitt, mgr. S.F.; Barr Sheets, mgr. Det.; Carter Ringlep, mgr. Dallas 

HIGHLIGHTS: CBS will introduce three new series at the con- 
vention: The Brothers Brannagan, starring Mark Roberts and 
Steve Dunne, Rogue for Hire, with Jerome Thor, and a Terry- 
toon Deputy Dawg. Of the known features will be The 
Honey moon ers, Rendezvous, Whirlybirds, and others. 



CH 2300-011 



ZIV-UA, INC.— ECONOMEE 

488 Madison Avenue 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION (ZIV-UA): M. J.j 

Rifkin, exec. v.p. sis,; Robert W. Friedheim. admin, v.p.; Len Firestone.! 
v.p. synd. sis.; Edward J. Broman, v.p. regional sis. mgr. 

FOR ECONOMEE: Peter Weiss, v.p. and gen. mgr.; Dick LawrenceJ 
div. sis. mgr.; Ken Joseph, div. sis. mgr. 

HIGHLIGHTS: Jerome Courtland stars in the Viking serie|B 
(UA Synd. Sis. Div. of ZIV-UA synd. sis. dept.) Walter Barnifl 
and others will be featured in these sea adventure episodes 
Economee will feature its currently running series of Harlot 
Command, Highway Patrol, with Broderick Crawford; Sciend 
Fiction Theatre and West Point. The power hitters of botl 
baseball leagues will be viewed in Ziv's latest syndicated show 
Called Home Run Derby, it's a world championship homer cott 
test. 



INDEPENDENT TELEVISION CORP. (ITC) 

488 Madison Avenue 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: William Duboii 
v.p. cent, div.; Carl Russell, Midwest sis mgr.; Stanley Levey, mgi 
special projects 

HIGHLIGHTS: Charles Korvin appears in Interpol Calling 
new half hour film being presented by ITC. Sweet Success. J 
(Please turn to page 74j 



12 ( UWIVIION SPECIAL 



2 APRII 




h rating rewards are yours when you dip 

d this fabulous treasure chest of M-G-M cartoons . . . featuring a host of 

laff-a-minute favorites created by such top-flight 

' / * animators as Tex Avery and Hanna & Barbera. 

Every M-G-M cartoon offers top-quality, 

full animation, more visual excitement, more 

hilarious situations, and more fabulous sight gags. 

Watch those ratings zoom when one youngster 

tells another that your channel is programming 

these fun-packed M-G-M cartoons! 




CONTACT US AT THE 

NAB CONVENTION 

ROOM 2406, CONRAD > 



division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 
1S40 Broadway-New York, N. Y. 



its 

res,, 
that 



WNEW— New York KSYD— Wichita Falls, Texas WAMS— Wilmington KQEO— Albuquerque WHLO— Akron-Canton WING— Dayton KRIZ— Phoe^ 



You'll get better results than you 

bargained for when you use an Eastman 

Represented Station. You'll be placing your 

client's message on top radio facilities in most of 

the top markets in America. Solid stations run by able 

and creative management— people who know the pulse of 

their listeners and how to hold their loyalty. And every East/ 

man gets this full story to as many executives involved in the 

buying of time as it is humanly possible to reach. But it's results 

that count. So here they are. In 1959 the Eastman Represented Stations 

increased their total national billing 44% over the year before. We'd 

say the combination has paid off handsomely for every one concerned. 



IASWAN REPRESENTED STATIONS GfT RESULTS. 



Come up and see us at Executive House — Suite 2704 



(0J)robert e. eastman & co., 



representing major radio stations 



CHICAGO: 
iue 333 N. Michig 



SAN FRANCISCO: DALLAS: 

Russ Bldg. 211 North E 

YUkon 2-9760 Riverside 7- 



LOS ANGELES: DETROIT: 

t Bldg. Taft Building Book Buildin 



FILMS 

[Continued from pai> 

Jack Douglas effort, will also be available at this year's conven- 
tion. Jeff's Collie, (.the re-run of Lassie.) Ding Dong School, 
and Four Just Men. among others, will be part of the show. 



MCA-TV CH 244)0 

598 Madison Avenue 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: David V. Sutton, 
v.p. film synd. div.; Wynn Nathan, v.p.; Lou Friedland, v.p.; DeArv 
Barton, v.p.; Jim Stirton, v.p.; Bob Greenberg, v.p. 

HIGHLIGHTS: Attention-getters at the MCA-TV suite will be 
three new film series. Thirty-nine half hours available for each 
of the following: Shotgun Slade starring Scott Brady. Edmond 
O'Brien in Johnny Midnight, and Coronado with Rod Cammeron. 
State Trooper. Mike Hammer, and Kit Carson will also be shown. 



MCM-TV CH 2406 

1540 Broadway 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Richard A. Harp- 
er, dir. of synd. & feature film sis.; Richard Yates, sis. rep.; Paul 
Mowry, sis. consultant; Charles Alsup, Western sis. rep.; Monroe 
Mendelson, promo, mgr. 

HIGHLIGHTS: This year. MGM will concentrate its interests on 
films from its library. On the agenda will be 135 cartoons. More 
specifically, viewers will see Barney Bear. Captain and the Kids. 
and 101 Pete Smith Shorts. Although from the library, these 
films are new to the market. 



NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES BL 

10 Columbus Circle 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Harold Goldman, 
exec, v.p.; Jonny Graff, v.p. Eastern sis.; Marty Roberts, dir. of 
promo.; Oliver A. Unger, pres.; Eli Landau, chairman of the board; 
Marvin Lowe, acct. exec. Chi.; Allan Ash, acct. exec. Chi. 

HIGHLIGHTS: National Telefilm Associates will be highlighting 
two film programs this year at the convention. The Play of the 
Week, a two-hour long series will be one of the offerings, fea- 
turing different stars in each episode. Assignment Lnderuater. 
a new half hour show, is the second program to be featured. 



SCREEN CEMS CH 2500 

711 Fifth Avenue 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Robert Seidleman, 
74 • 1C CONVENTION SPECIAL 



dir. synd. sis.; Stan Dudelson, synd. sis. mgr.; Pien-e Marquis, dir. ac 
& sis. planning; Dan Goodman, Eastern sis. mgr.; Dick Dinsmore. We; 
ern sis. mgr.; Robert Newgard, Midwest sis. mgr.; Frank Parton, Soutl 
western sis. mgr.; Don Bryan, Southern sis mgr.; William Young, Not 
Central sis. mgr. 



JAYARK 

15 East 48th Street 

New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Harvey L Victo 
v.p. & gen. sis. mgr.; William Vidas, sis. rep. Midwest; Cranshai 
Bonner, sis. rep. 

HIGHLIGHTS: Jayark will center its attention at the convei 
tion this year on two film series. One for the children, Bozt 
Cloun. Stars such as Gary Cooper. James Cagney. Barba: 
Stanwyck, and Lili Palmer can be viewed in the Blockbusf. 
Features, the second series which is being highlighted. 



TRANS-LUX TV CORPORATION CH 190( 

625 Madison Avenue 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Richard Brai 
pres.; Richard Carlton, v.p. sis.; Leo Brody, Eastern div. sis. mg-. 
Jack J. Brown, Midwest div. mgr.; Murray Oken, West div. mgtl 

HIGHLIGHTS: Trans-Lux will feature four print* from its fili 
series The American Ciiil War. These, by name, will be: Anti< 
tarn. Nigkt of the Assassins. Appomatox and The Battle of Geth 
burg. 






STERLING 

6 East 39th Street 
New York City 

REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CONVENTION: Elliot Abra 
sis. mgr.; Bob Schlessel, Midwest sis. mgr. 

HIGHLIGHTS: This year at the NAB convention. Sterling will 
be presenting two film series. The first featured show is a cartoci 
series entitled Captain Sailor Bird. Comedians. Abbott and Cot 
tello. will appear in their old films as the other highlighted pr> 



MODERN TALKING PICTURES SERVICE INC. 

CH 2119-^ 

3 Ea-t 54th Street 

N, * York City 

REPRESENTATIVE AT THE CONVENTION: Ralph J. DelCor^ 

gen. mgr. of operations 

HIGHLIGHTS: Modern Talking Picture Service will be center 
ing its attention at the convention this year on one hundred i 
titles for the television market. 1 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 19CJ' 



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FROM THE 
SIDEWALKS OF 
NEW YORK 
TO THE 
VALLEYS OF 
THE MOON... 

New York gets ALL the news on 
WRCA-TV. From Brooklyn 
to Bangkok . . . from Manhattan 
to Mars . . . wherever the news 
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the news, New Yorkers get it 
all, get it fast via channel 4. 

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people -the award- winning 
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McCaffery, whose "Eleventh 
Hour News" commands the 
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daily news program in the 
world . . . Ken Banghart and 
Bob Wilson . . . Bill Ryan and 
Leon Pearson. In millions of 
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are synonymous with News. 

And they're backed-up by a 
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INDUSTRY 

(Continued from page 67) 

and on number of commercial "posi- 
tions." 

At NBC the record of the past six 
months shows comparable activity 
though NBC and CBS have differed 
in their approach to the problem: 

5 November — NBC President Rob- 
ert E. Kintner. testifying before the 
House Committee on Legislative Over- 
sight, discusses background of quiz 
program problems, says that hear- 
ings of the Harris Committee "gave 
the public and also NBC the first es- 
tablished evidence of quiz show rig- 
ging-" 

He discloses that NBC has taken 
new steps to "detect, root out and 
prevent dishonesty on our quiz 
shows." These include a spot check 
of former contestants by professional 
investigators, extension of security 
provision to cover all audience par- 
ticipation programs, revision of pro- 
gram package contracts to include 
representations or warranties of hon- 
est conduct, and affidavits from all 
NBC executives in any way connected 
with quiz shows. 

Kintner also announces that a new, 
special, professionally equipped in- 
vestigatory unit has been set up at 
NBC, under the supervision of ex- 
FBI official Jerome Doyle, as tempo- 
rary head. The new unit, says Kint- 
ner, will become a regular permanent 
part of NBC. 

To provide a deterrent to possible 
future wrong doing, Kintner proposes 
Federal legislation, making rigging of 
broadcast contests a criminal offense, 
and offers a preliminary draft of such 
legislation. 

29 November — In a newspaper ad- 
vertisement, signed by Kintner and 
NBC Board Chairman Robert W. 
Sarnoff, the network offers a five- 
point "Statement on Television." The 
statement includes the following, 
"NBC assumes complete responsibil- 
ity to the public for what appears on 
the NBC Television Network," and 
says, "We will crack down on im- 
proper practices, wherever they may 
appear, in programing or advertis- 
ing." 

30 November — James A. Stabile 
appointed v. p. in charge of NBC's 
new Department of Standards and 
Practices. Stabile's operation to in- 
clude policy review of program and 



advertising standards, analysis of all 
radio/tv program practices, and 
management supervision of Continu- 
ity Acceptance Department. 

4 December — In first directive, 
Stabile announces NBC will take di- 
rect control of arrangements to ob- 
tain prizes for any program on its 
facilities. Identification of prizes to 
be made in strict accordance with 
NAB Tv Code. 

16 December — NBC policies re- 
garding payola restated in new direc- 
tives from Department of Standards 
and Practices. "Any NBC employee 
who acts in contravention of the fore- 
going . . . shall be subject to dis- 
charge forthwith." 

30 December — Ernest Lee Jahncke 
Jr. named NBC Director, Standards, 
John A. Cimperman, Director, Prac- 
tices. 

26 January — Department of Stand- 
ards and Practices issues new direc- 
tives covering identification of re- 
corded program material, and han- 
dling of news programs, interviews, 
and editorial opinions. 

2 February — NBC sends copies of 
NAB Broadcast Standards and Tv 
Code to network and outside pro- 
gram executives, producers, directors, 
stresses need to abide by these stand- 
ards and gives special emphasis to 
tv's obligation to the child audience. 

2 February— NBC President Kint- 
ner, addressing a special meeting of 
the ANA, discusses steps taken by the 
network to "eliminate any question- 
able or borderline practices which 
may have developed over the past ten 
years of tv's tremendous growth," 
notes that 90% of NBC TV circula- 
tion is represented by stations who 
are Tv Code members. 

26 February — Kintner and Sarnoff, 
in a letter sent to advertising agen- 
cies and clients, summarize NBC 
steps taken on quiz shows, free plu<2«. 
and other unethical practices, as well 
as tightening of standards governing 
claims, demonstrations. NBC pledges 
support for Tv Code, and cooperation 
with FCC, FTC, ANA, AAAA, and 
the Attorney General's office. 

3. The ANA Record 

The Association of National Ad- 
vertisers, an organization of 650 lead- 
ing companies, including nearly all 
of the nation's top tv advertisers be- 
gan action on the current broadcast 



crisis at its annual Fall Meeting 
Hot Springs, Va. 

8 November— ANA Board of Di 
rectors meet in special session, dn 
statement of advertiser responsibilj 
ties in tv. 

9 November— ANA Board Chair 
man Donald S. Frost of Bristol My 
ers announces to membership, "It i 
our responsibility as advertisers t 
see that every aspect of tv yvith yvhie; 
we are connected meets our obliga 
tion of fair play to the public." 

NAB members urged, individually 
to begin an immediate revieyv of thei 
oyvn commercials and programs usiiy 
a simple test. "Would we be williri 
for the public to be fully apprised ( 
all the facts and circumstances co* 
cerning a particular program or conj 
mercial?" 

5 January — ANA, after series < 
conferences yvith FTC, FCC, NAJ 
and others, announces plans for a 
unprecedented special membershi 
meeting to deal yvith yvhat Presid( 
Paul West calls a "serious situatio 
affecting all advertising." 

2 February — ANA special meetiil 
in New York hears Earl W. Kintm 
Chairman FTC, Robert Kinti 
President NBC, James T. Aubre 
President CBS TV, Donald H. M 
Gannon, Chairman NAB Tv Code fl 
view Board. Robert M. Ganger, Boa; 
Chairman AAAA, and others outli 
the "crisis in confidence" whi« 
threatens tv and advertising. 

ANA members, in closed sessii 
vote for three-point program of 
tion to 1) promote better work 
relationship with the FTC, 2) est 
lish continuing liaison between 
tional advertisers and media 
agency organizations yvhich have 
initiate self-regulatory procedu 
3) establish an Advertising Advis' 
Council of "Elder statesmen" 
guide and advise the industry in 
building the credibility and acc< 
ability of advertising. 

1 March — ANA publishes "Lei 
Rules of the Road to Honest Ad\l 
tising" by Gilbert S. Weil, Assocl 
tion counsel, as guide for advertisi 
in preparing and evaluating till 
copy. ' 

Note: For a continuation of m 
record and a list of actions taken M 
the AAAA and other groups, see rl 
tveek's SPONSOR. 



78 • 20 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



2 APRIL ll 



"Where else! 

CBS Films, Suite 2319*. 

First-class entertainment 

is their specialty." 




•ATTHE CONRAD HILTON: YOU'RE INVITEDI 



yew&weeiy 




Host- 
Narrator 
TRUMAN 
BRADLEY 



SCIENCE FICTION TKHtt 

ibltnWW dven tureswi t h 

TVs unique senes of ^space g ^ 

Dlg name stars in e»c, t ,ng W» ^ „ 

top multi-run ratings- ■• — - 

.4.8. Orlando 20-a. *}§ EL 
2 Ha-lingen-Weslaco . . • ^ f ,-T 



^cwtMeiv/ 




I LED 3 LIVES 



three lives for his country. Bi 



Colorado Springs 16.; 
Honolulu 16.2, Alban\ 



24.9 






Action! 

Gallantry! 

Excitement! 




Starring 
The Corps 
Of Cadets 



SMASH 
RE-RUN 



WEST POINT RATINGS 



th " e --Buff.lo2 2 .9,PM,l^ h °"''" 9S! Ra " n9S ■» 
Greer, Ba a y ,Ph ' a,9 ' 2 ' Wichi '^=-3. 



"■■« •»■*, Wichita 25.3 

26.3 



AND RESULTS.. 

for stations and 

advertisers ! 



£ceww^ 



fymmty 



Glorious as 
our country's 



il 




MEN OF ANNAPOLIS BOSTON BUCKIE 

■ "■■•■ .. «,f,nn<i America's m«o+ .. 



Port Arthur 24.8, Chariotte. 



a series, t>oib« «»-. 

28.7 



sX c MrCs u :r'r n,ys,erysh - !5e ^^- 



25.2 



America's 
Favorite ' 
Family Show! 



ywmt!3> 






Starring 

MACDONALD 

CAREY 



r >a 



DR. CHRISTIAN 



39 quality-produced, success-proved half hours 
winning sensational ratings like these for the show 
that delivers the all-family audience: New Orleans 
21 .2, Kansas City 18.6, Cin- 
cinnati 20.2, Pittsburgh 



26.8 



CURRENT FILES PACKED 
WITH SUCCESS STORIES 

° r J"" or alternate sponsorship or as spot carriers to 
fit sales or program needs. ers t0 





ocmfne(y 



ADOLPHE 
MEIMJOU 



FAVORITE STORY 

Blr mingham . . .' ^J 1 ^% 



TIMES SQUARE PLAYHOUSE 

Top Hollywood stars, brilliant stories, and master- 
ful showmanship in every half hour program. 39 
exciting dramas with ratings like Philadelphia 13.6, 
St. Louis 19.5, Cleveland 20.6, 
San Antonio . 



32.5 



ytmmy 



TV's Unquestioned 
#1 Series! 




Starring 
BRODERICK 



HIGHWAY PATROL 



:ry possible record! Riding high ir 
atings like these: Shreveport 34.4 



42.7 




CD modern approaches to one old broadcasting problen 
finding the right music at the right price. 



SESAC RECORDINGS announces the new all-LP mus| 
Program Service, brilliantly produced on hi-fi recordings and featuring the gre; 
names of the industry. Six different purchase plans to choose from. Outriglj 
ownership. Your choice of albums. New releases. 

Popular, jazz, classical, country and western, religious, band music, and tfl 
"DRUMMERS"* - SESAC's all-new recorded sales starters, station promos ail 
production spots. 

To see and hear and learn about the Big Six purchase plans, visit the SESAJ 
Hospitality Suite 1206A at the Conrad Hilton Hotel during the 1960 NA j 
Convention. 






SESAC INC. 



THE COLISEUM TOWER 
10 COLUMBUS CIRCLE 



NEW YORK 19, 



CONVENTION SPECIAL 




XAMINING new projector are Celloma + ic's pres. Milt Rogin (L 



Tom Ho 



EQUIPMENT EXHIBITORS 

^ Here's who's showing what at the Convention and 
vhere you'll find the many new technical items on display 



ADLER ELECTRONICS, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 24 



epresentatives at contention 

Ben Adler. 

Alfred Strogoff 
I Stanley Lapin 

Emanuel Strunin 

Edward Galuska 

Henry Shapiro 

Mel Berstler 

John Klindworth 

L. A. Wallace 

Robert Sinks 
* Willard Colvin 

Arthur Turner 

Roy Bright 

Joseph De Bragga 

James P. Quinn 

Don Carmichael 

Martin Silver 

roducts 

Adler I RT-3 l Heterodyne Repeater 
(-economical tv microwave system 
>rmultihop inter-city relavs. TV-STL 
ind remote pickups. Features include 
0-watt output, no demodulation. 
j"ystal-controlled frequencv stability 
nd operation in the 2 kmc range. 

Adler i UST-10, RA-7 i 10-watt and 

iPONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



100-watt Translators are economical, 
FCC approved systems for extending 
tv station coverage to unserved areas. 
Translators now rebroadcast more 
than 100 vhf and uhf stations. 

Adler (UST-100) 100 watt UHF TV 
Transmitter serves communities with 
locally originated programs plus net- 
work programing picked up off-the- 
air. This low power transmitter also 
can serve as the main station of multi- 
channel ETV systems. 

Adler Unitized UHF Antennas — 
rugged, compact transmitting anten- 
nas for tv translator systems and 
originating tv stations. 

Adler (VCA-1) Low Noise Pream- 
plifier for use with translator and 
microwave systems in weak signal 
areas. 

ALBION OPTICAL CO. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 39N 



Representatives at convention 

Benjamin Berg 
Arthur Challinor 
M. Stechly 

[Please turn to page 86) 




s, 20 East 46th Street, New York 17, N. Y. 



SUITE 2106 Conrad Hilton Hotel 




CONVENTION SPECIAL 




•• 9 



■r. 



The 

daytime 
picture 
was never 
brighter! 

Latest safaris into Nielsen 
Country continue to bring back 
very bright figures indeed — 
for ABC Daytime TV. Look close 
and you can see a 25.0 Share 
of Audience. You can see 2.3 million 
homes being reached by ABC 
per average minute during the 
noon to 4 p.m. program block. 

The same programming strategy 
that's been catapulting ABC-TV 
into No. 1 position week after week 
has been paying off during the 
day, too. In the last six months, 
ABC's Share has jumped by 38%, 
its average audience by 86%. 

And this is a special audience. 
A younger audience with larger 
families. Three out of four ABC 
homes are in this market of real 
consumers... these people who 
respond most actively to the fun 
and games of a Beat the Clock 
starring Bud Collyer, or take 
the cheerful zest of a Gale 
Storm Show . . . the edge-of-your- 
sofa excitement of a Restless 
Gun . . . the fun and frolic of a 
Love That Bob starring Bob 
Cummings or, for that matter, 
a Who Do You Trust? 

There's another bright figure in 

this ABC success story. That's ABC 

Daytime's CPM of $1.10. 

For as little as $7,633 per V 4 hour, 

a sponsor gets everything. 

He gets time, talent, the works. 

All in all, a very choice chartful 

of reasons why sponsors like Lever 

Brothers, Mastic Tile 

Foods, Renuzit, Johr 

Vitamin Sales ( 

RestonicMattr 

American Red 

Beech-Nut: a ;oose 

ABC Daytime TV. Q 

WATCH ABC-TV IN '60 

(more people will) 







What's troubling you about your present station representa- 
tion? □ Creativity? □ Manpower? □ Enthusiasm? □ Re- 
search? □ Aggressiveness? Do these words describe the kind 
of rep you're looking for? Well, the search can begin to end 
for you during the NAB convention, 



ite 
00 



of the Conrad Hilton, where Adam Young. Steve Machcinski 
and Jim O'Grady would like to say Hello, and tell you the 
performance story behind our recent growth news: More man- 
power, more space, more facilities. 



ADAM YOUNG INC. 
YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ST. LOUIS 
SAN FRANCISCO • DETROIT • ATLANTA 



LOS ANGELES 
NEW ORLEANS 



EQUIPMENT 

< Continued from page 83) 

Products 

Fixed (ocas and variable fc 
length lenses for television and 
tion pictures manufactured by T^ 
lor. Ta\ lor ii Hobson. Eng 
Cooke ^jieed Panchro. Ortal. \ arc 
lenses. Studio and outside broadc! 
lenses. Servo controlled variable 
cal length lenses. 

ALFORD MFC. CO. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 25 



Representative* at convention 
Harold H. Leach 
Thomas E. Mackenzie 

Products 

Television broadcast antennas, 
plexers. coaxial switches, vesti. 
sideband filters, rf measuring ins: 

n.ents. 

ALTO FONIC TAPE SERVIO 
INC. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 45N 
4067 Transport St. 
Palo Alto, Calif 

Representatives at convention 

D. Allan Clark 
Walter Merila 



AMPEX CORP. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 32 

934 CSarter St. 

Redwood City, Caltfor-ia 

Representatives at convention 
George I. Long. Jr. 
Robert L. Sackman 
Phillip L. Gundy 
Neal K. McNaughten 
Charles P. Ginsburg 

Products 

Ampex VR-1000B videotape 
corder for black and white record 
Ampex VR-1000B videotape rec :i 
er with color conversion access' 
Marconi Mark IV image orthi 
television camera channel and a- 
ciated equipment. Ampex \ R-l<> 
videotape recorder with switch?. 
405,525 and 625 line standards, 
pex VR-1000B videotape recor 
with Ampex INTER-SYNC inter? 
chronizing accessory. Solid state \ 
tical interval video switching eqi 



( u\\ ENTIOJi 5PECIAL 



2 \pril r 



I 



I 



I 



ment. Ampex models 300,351 and 

352 professional audio recorders in 
rack, console and portable mountings. 



BAUER ELECTRONICS CORP. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 38N 
1011 Industrial Way 
Burlingame, Calif. 

Representatives at convention 

Fritz Bauer 
Paul Gregg 
Duncan Peckham 

Products 

It 'on 250 watt and 5000 watt arr 
transmitters. 



BOCEN-PRESTO DIV. 



Representatives at convention 
Thomas L. Ave 
Lawrence E. Epstein 

Products 

Tape and disc recorders. Ampli- 
fiers and turntables. 



CATERPILLAR TRACTOR CO 



Representatives at convention 

C. L. Stone 
R. V. Bradley 

D. E. Shoupp 
B. P. Bessert 

Products 

Diesel and natural gas electric sets 
for primary or standby power. 

CELLOMATIC CORP. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 37N 



Representatives at convention 
Thomas B. Howell 
Milt Rogin 
Ernest Vetter 
Owen Zapel 
George Headon 
William E. Walsh 

Products 

CeUomatic projectors, new com- 
posite animation projector. 



COLLINS RADIO CO. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 34 



Representatives at convention 

E. S. Gagnon 
H. 0. Olson 

B. V. Hite 

F. C. Gebhardt 
R. E. Richards 

C. H. Smith 

E. J. Maloney 

F. H. Damm 
R. ML Winston 
E. G. Randolph 
J. M. Haerle 
J. H. Speck 

C. P. Glade 
T. W . Sharpe 
E. C. Whitaker 
E. L. King 

E. J. Powell 

J. F. Stanberv 
H. W. Hepler 

G. R. Schneider 

F. P. Wallace 

G. ML Bergmann 
L. H. Leggett 

R. N. Edwards 

D. W. Hoisington 
R. J. Henry 

J. A. Chenoweth 

Products 

Am and fm broadcast transmitters, 
phasing equipment, antenna tuning 
equipment, speech input consoles, cus- 
tom studio desk, remote amplifiers, 
remote control equipment, limiting 
control equipment, limiting amplifier, 
turntables, microphones, loud speak- 
ers, tape recorders, automation equip- 
ment, miscellaneous accessories. 



CONRAC, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 23 



Representatives at convention 
W. J. Moreland 
R. M. Alston 
J. G. Jones 
C. A. Nichols 
K. Williams 
P. Wickham 

Products 

Monochrome video monitors-audio- 
video receivers for "off-the-air"" mon- 
! and rebroadcasting. 



CONTINENTAL ELECTRONIC 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

A Subsidiary of Ling Altec Electronics, 
4212 So. Buclmer Blvd. 
Dallas 27, Tex. 
EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 33 
Representatives at convention 

James 0. Weldon 
W. M. Witty 

Thomas B. Moselev 
Mark W. Bullock 
Vernon Collins 
Richard P. Buckner 
Ray Tucker 

Products 

Am broadcast transmitters i 
transmitter remote control equipmt 

CONTINENTAL MFC, INC 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 41 N 

1612 California St. 
Omaha 2, Neb. 

Representatives at convention 

Ray B. McMartin 
Leonard Hedlund 
Ray T_ nrath 
Bob Farnsworth 
Bruce Trimble 

Products 

Fm multiplex receivers, fixed 4 
quencv receivers, custom designed , 
ceivers and monitors, audio am{ 
fiers — * o w and up. am-fm tune 
stereo amplifiers, radio intercom s 
terns. 



DACE TELEVISION DIVISIOT 

THOMPSON RAMO WOOLDRIDGE I 
Michigan City, Ind. 
EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 3 
Representatives at convention 
Allan Finstad 
J. L. Lahey 
Wells Chapin 
Llovd Matter 
William Elmendorf 
Joseph W. Alinskv 

Products 

Television cameras, studio can 
control equipment, transistor: 
svnc. generators, portable televi- 
systems. 

ELECTRONIC APPLICATION) 
INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 6 



Representatives at c 
John Costello 



• 30 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



fruus M. Skee 
incent J. Skee 

■ducts 

WT 940 turntable, EMT/rever- 
ation unit, EMT special cables, 
T wireless micr. system, NAGRA 
3 portable tape recorder, AKG and 
T studio and field microphones, 
G dynamic headsets, shock-proof 
r. stands. STELLAVOX miniature 
3 recorder, SIEMENS & Halske 
del U-71 peak volume indicator 
em. EMT fm operations relay re- 
ers. 

■AIRCHILD CAMERA AND 
ISTRUMENT CORPORATION 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 9A 
580 Midland Ave. 
Yonlters, N. Y. 
tresentatives at convention 
Herbert M. Oshan 
Gerard J. Morio 
lichard Goldberg 
Charles J. Sass 
Edward Curry 
•ducts 
Cinephonic 16", processor F-316. 

0TO-VIDEO ELECTRONICS, 
INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 19 



iresentatives at convention 
\. J. Baracket 

(oseph Carris 

ducts 

ligh definition film equipment 
lpletely modularized, transistor- 
1 vidicon camera, movie — slide — 
que multiplexer. High definition 
tv cameras with all-modular built - 
aperture and phase corrector and 
ible-cascode pre-amplifier, and 
it panel video composite level 
er. Complete line of utility and 
fessional monitors all with plug-in 
Hales, 8". 14", 17", 21", 24", and 
1, in both portable and rack-mount- 
'- design. All-transistorized power 
'plies, 3 ampere and 0.5 ampere 
ulators and silicon 25 ampere and 
Impere power rectifiers. All-tran- 
Oifiorized, completely modular sync 
erator, EIA interlaced closed cir- 
; unit in S 1 ^" of rack space. Com- 
e broadcast EIA sync generator 
pack-mounted and portable design 
transistorized module design — 
Ight less than 10 lbs. Complete 

iInsor • 2 APRIL 1960 



video test centers combining mono- 
scope cameras, keyed video signal 
generators, bar-dot generators, sync 
generators, camera control units, as 
provided by Foto-Video to the Bell 
System, U. S. Air Force and to FAA. 
Foto products — The only complete 
line of tv light boxes for monochrome 
and color and complete sets of tv test 
slides, transparencies, opaques, and 
16mm film. 



CATES RADIO COMPANY 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 2 

123 Hampshire St. 

Ouincy, III. 

Representatives at convention 

P. S. Gates 
L. J. Cervone 
Ed Wilder 
N. L. Jochem 
John R. Price 
Gene Edwards 
Tom Humphrey 
Franz Chernv 
Frank Grasett 
Robert Hallenbeck 
Wallace Warren 
Abe Jacobowitz 
Stanley Whitman 
Joe Engle 
Reck Morgan 
Richard Spruill 
Wm. Moats 
London England 
Urlin Whitman 

Products 

Am-fm-tv broadcast transmitters. 
audio systems, automatic systems for 
both full time and spot programing, 
spot tape recorders, transcription 
turntables, frequency and modulation 
monitors, remote amplifiers, leveling 
amplifiers, plus other representative 
broadcast equipment. 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 

COMMUNICATION PRODUCTS DEPT. 

TECHNICAL PRODUCTS OPERATION 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 31 

Electronics Park 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Representatives at convention 
R. L. Casselberry 
Harold B. Towlson 
J. Wall 
C. J. Simon 
C. H. Jensen 
A. F. Carl 
M. R. Duncan 
Charles H. Lake 



Field sales representative) 

J. H. Douglas 
W. G. Broughton 
R. W. Cochran 
H. H. Condo 
L. F. Page 
E. H. Piatt 
J. M. Comer, Jr. 
T. F. Bost. Jr. 
V. H. Russell 
R. E. Lauterbach 
H. W. Granberrv 
J. F. Walter 

Products 

New (3) 1-0 color camera, new 
I-O, b&w camera, vidicon cameras 
(film and live), new b&w continuous 
motor film projector. rela\ switching 
system, transistorized sync genera- 
tor, new b&w calibration monitor, 
audio console-transistorized, new re- 
mote audio amplifier-transistorized, 
full-sized section of vhf helical an- 
tenna, complete line of audio equip- 
ment, portable and rack mounted 
2000 mc relax. 10 kw low & high 
channel tv transmitter. 



GENERAL ELECTRONIC 
LABORATORIES, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 35 

18 Ames St.- 1 95 Massachusetts Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Representatives at convention 
Victor W. Storey 
B. T. Newman 
Sal Fulchino 
Paul Day 

Products 

15,000 watt and 1.000 watt fm 
transmitters with fm multiplex excit- 
ers including main channel exciter, 
subchannel generator and power sup- 
ply mounted in cabinet as a complete 
integrated system. 



GPL DIVISION OF 
GENERAL PRECISION, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 26 
63 Bedford Rd. 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 
Representatives at convention 
N. M. Marshall 
E. J. Manzo 
L. L. Pourciau 
A. F. Brundage 

Products 

New high resoh 
chain, studio & rerm \ idicon cam- 
era chains, vide 
generators, video switch 



special 31 



89 



telecast projectors, video & pulse dis- 
tribution amplifiers, standard mono- 
chrome vidicon film chains, tv pro- 
jection systems. 

THE HARWALD CO., INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 12 



Re presen I ali it's at convention 
Robert Crunwald 
Richard Wallace 
Howard Bowen 
Paul Browder 
Sam Caldwell 
Maurice Dalton 
Ray Short 

Products 

Manufacture and distribute 16 mm 
film inspection equipment, 16 mm 
motion picture projectors including 
continuous projectors. 2x2 continu- 
ous slide projectors with related ac- 
cessories. 

HUCHEY & PHILLIPS, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 30 
3200 No. San Fernando Blvd. 
Burbanlc, Calif. 
Representatives at convention 
H. V. Claeson 
J. H. Ganzenhuber 
H. J. Geist 
R. L. Lang 
F. J. Little. Jr. 

Products 

Manufacturers of 300 mm beacons, 
obstruction lights, photo-electric con- 
trols, beacon flashers, special junc- 
tion boxes, microwave tower light 
control and alarm systems, tower 
lighting isolation transformers, and 
complete kits for: tower lighting, 
sleet melter power and control. 

INDUSTRIAL TRANSMITTERS 
& ANTENNAS, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 11 
235 Fairfield Ave. 
Upper Darby. Pa. 
Representatives at convention 

Bernard Wise 
Eliot Baker 
Clyde Heck, Sr. 
Stanley Friedman 
Robert Jordan 

Products 

I in broadcast transmitters, fm 
multiplex equipment, remote control 
equipment, remote pickup equipment, 
fm relay equipment. 



KAHN RESEARCH 
LABORATORIES, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 5 
81 South Bergen Place 
Freeport, N. Y. 
Representatives at convention 
Leonard R. Kahn 
Kenneth B. Boothe 
Products 

The Kahn Model STR-59-1A stereo 
exciter-driver system permits com- 
patible stereophonic broadcasts over 
a single am transmitter and for the 
first time a practical method is of- 
fered for stereo reception on two 
standard am receivers. When used 
with any standard am transmitter, the 
system produces two independent 
sidebands individually modulated by 
each stereo channel. Upper or lower 
sidebands can then be demodulated 
by conventional am detectors without 
inherent distortion and with marked 
improvement in audio fidelity. Thus, 
stereophonic reception is achieved 
by simply placing two standard re- 
ceivers approximately six feet apart 
and tuning them to the respective 
upper and lower sidebands. When 
single receivers are tuned to the car- 
rier in the normal am manner, both 
stereo channels can be received com- 
patibly without loss of program bal- 
ance. It offers the desired mass ap- 
peal of an all-am system, plus the 
unique advantage that the public has 
nothing to buy to be introduced to 
stereophonic broadcasting on the wid- 
est possible scale. It is expected that 
special receivers with single-control 
tuning and other improvements would 
be introduced later by various re- 
ceiver manufacturers once the system 
is adopted. Installations include 
CJAD, Montreal; the major power 
station in Mexico Citv: and Radio 
Rumbos and Radio Continente in 
Caracas, Venezuela. 

Compatible single-sideband adapt- 
ers for am broadcasting transmitters. 
This new and thoroughly proven tech- 
nique doubles effective transmitter 
power, greatly improves audio fidel- 
ity in average home receivers and re- 
duces adjacent and co-channel inter- 
ference. Transmitters require no en- 
gineering modifications, and recep- 
tion is fully compatible on all am 
receivers. 

Symmetra-peak. model SP-58-1A, 
a passive network widely used by 
broadcasters as an economical way to 
increase coverage range of am, fm 
and t\ \oice transmissions. Voice 



modulation increases of up to 4 d] 
plus improved performance of A(3 
amplifiers and limiters, is provided,' 

KLIECL BROS. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 17 



Representatives at convention 
Herbert R. More 
James Jewell 
David Safford 
Wm. Morris 

Products 

Kliegl Bros, manufactures a coi 
plete line of tv lighting fixtures, a 
cessories. wiring devices and light 
selection and control equipment f! 
monochrome and color telecastin 
The new and revolutionary SCR sen| 
conductor dimmer using the sili< 
controlled rectifier will be featurq 
Assistance in the planning of light] 
and associated facilities is availab. 

LUMITRON DIVISION 

METROPOLITAN ELEC. MFG. CO., IN 
EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 15 
2250 Steinway St. 
Long Island City, N. Y. 
Representatives at convention 
Jim Connolly 
Tonv Dituro 
Paul Shapiro 
Jim Shelley 
Charles Shevlin 

Products 

Light control systems, dimmer 
trols, studio lights, switch gear, pa 
boards, bus ducts, main service s 
plies. LO-OHM switches, Pressu 
Tite switches. 

MACKENZIE ELECTRONIC 
INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 98 
145 West Haiel St. 
Inglewood 3, Calif. 
Representatives at convention 
Louis G. MacKenzie 
Wayne W. Graham 
Norman Ostby 

Products 

Multi-channel program repeat 
automatic announcing machines, 

MINNEAPOLIS-HONEYWEL 
REC. CO. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 10 



90 • 32 CONVENTION SPECIAL 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL '. 



LOWEST cost per thousand 



WIBW-TV 
PROVES IT 




f Lowest cost per 
thousand for CBS-TV 
nighttime and day- 
time programs when 
compared with five 
other CBS affiliates 
in Kansas and Missouri 
(November 1959 ARB) 



NSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



You have to buy 

Topeka to 

cover the rich, 

growing 38-county 

Topeka Market. Get 

the facts from your 

Avery-Knodel man. 



LOWEST COST PER THOUSAND 

The November Topeka ARB 
Report proves WIBW-TV is 
an outstanding spot and 
network buy, day or night. 
YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY 
FOR ON WIBW-TV. 



WIBW TV 

CHANNEL 13 

TOPEKA 

CBS NBC ABC 

Division of Stauffer-Capper Publications 



CONVENTION SPECIAL 33 • 91 



Representative* at convention 

W McKnighl 
Gustave Eluenberg 

Product* 

Transmitting station automatic log- 
ging equipment and remote control 
automatic logging equipment. 

MINNESOTA MINING & MFC. 
CO. 



Representative* at convention 
L). E. Denham 
W . H. Madden 
D. T. Windahl 
C. L. Alden 
B. A. Holmberg 

Products 

"Scotch" Brand magnetic tapes and 
related products. 

MIRATEL, INC. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 47N 
1088 Dionne St. 
St. Paul 13, Minn. 

Representatives at convention 
\\ illiani S. Sadler 
H. E. Kurzweg 
N. C. Ritter 

Products 

Television video monitors and 
Citizens Band radio transmitters-re- 
ceivers. Conelrad receivers. Regu- 
lated power supplies and audio-con- 
trolled relays. Program failure alarm. 

PROCRAMATIC 
BROADCASTING SERVICE 

A DIVISION OF MUZAK 
EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 1 



Representatives at convention 

John Esau 
Robert H. Prater 
Robert E. Fender 
(.ti- \\ ebber 
David Bain 
Joseph W. Roberts 

Service 

Automatic broadcast equipment 
music programing service. Program- 
atic will be showing it- complete, 

full\ automatic radio programing 
service in action. Sold and or leased 
as a complete package-equipment and 



adult music programing-Programatic 
engineering and sales representatives 
will demonstrate how commercials 
and complete prerecorded local pro- 
grams i along with network cut-ins. 
if desired i ma\ be automatically in- 
tegrated into virtuallj any t\pe of 
broadcast schedule. 

RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA 



Representatives at convention 
T. A. Smith 

C. H. Colledge 
A. F. Inglis 

E. N. Luddv 
J. P. Taylor 
E. C. Tracy 
M. A. Trainer 
V. E. Trouant 
J. W. Wentworth 
H. W. Wyllie 
P. Bergquist 
P. A. Greenmever 
J. L. Grever 

E. T. Griffith 
J. E. Hill 

A. M. Miller 

D. Pratt 

W . B. \ arnum 
R. B. Houston 
C. F. Strawlej 

B. K. Kellom' 

Standard products engineering 
L. E. Anderson 
T. J. Boerner 
J. E. Dillev 
H. E. Gihring 
T. Gluvas 
H. N. Kozanowski 
A. H. Lind 

F. R. McXieol 
J. H. Roe 

H. W. Westcoti 
J. E. \oung 

RCA broadcast and television products 

Monochrome and color television 
equipment, uhf and vhf television 
transmitters. am fm transmitters. 
television tape equipment, audio 
equipment, monitoring equipment 
and test equipment for am, fm and 
t\ stations. Television mobile equip- 
ment, t\ cameras, control room 
equipment, am. fm and tv antenna 
systems, transmission line, tower 
lighting and accessories. Radio and 
tv station automation equipment. 
Microwave relaj equipment 



RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA 



Harrison, N. J. 
Representatives at convention 
H. C. Vance 
J. E. Kell) 
R. E. Johnson 
R. E. Eaw rence 
(7. I)\ macek 

Products 

Electron tubes and semicondu< 
devices. 

RAYTHEON CO. 



Representatives at convention 

Len Walker 
Rav Kendall 
J. j. Sedik 
Hugh Bannon 
A. F. Conrad 
H. J. Geist 
Duane Craw ford 

Products 

KTR microwave television re 
systems for remote pick-up or ! 
applications. 7,000 and 13.000 
Portable and rack-mounted for N 
color and simultaneous audio. 1 
program audio channel units for 
plication to existing systems. Mi 
wave waveguide accessories incluil 
antennas, waveguide, diplexers. eti 

SARKES TARZIAN, INC 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 18 
East Hillside Dr. 
Bloomington, Ind. 
Representatives at convention 
Biagio Presti 
Dan Meadows 
Neff Cox. Jr. 
Wendell Fuller 
Gene Keith 
Bill Tarr 
Miles Blazek 
Don Bower 
Roy Hackmeyer 
Lewis Hildinger 
Robert McCoy 
Charles Moore 
Xubar Donoi an 
Charles Tudor 
Richard Huffman 
George Morel 
Hubert Huffman 
\ aldemar Fagerlie 
Ted Rhodes 
Henry Cronin 
Lvman Abbott 



02 • vl CONVl n r ion spi 1 i\i. 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



Iharles Clapham 
iarkes Tarzian 
ack Roden 
/lorrell Beavers 

ducts 

leterodyne microwave relay, tv 

transmitters, complete tv station 
kages — including studio equip- 
lt, tv studio equipment, including: 
ge orthicon cameras — vidicon stu- 

cameras — vidicon film cameras — 
ho switchers — master monitors — 
c generators, audio equipment. 

SCHAFER CUSTOM 
ENGINEERING 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 14 



tresentatives at convention 
'aul C. Schafer 
i. Paul Comstock, Jr. 
om Magowan 
ames Brown 
aye Smith 

ducts 

vutomation — automatic program- 
. tape cartridge recorder player. 
lote control equipment. 

iTANDARD ELECTRONICS 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 28 
Lalcewood Rd. 
Farmingdale, N. J. 
fresentatives at convention 
V. H. Zillger 
'. T. Campbell 
ieed Haythorne 
immv Evans 
R. Taylor 
;oe Ewansky 

ducts 

Exhibiting — All new space-saving 
ipment, 250 watt fm transmitter 

stereo or multiplex, 5 kw fm 
nsmitter for stereo or multiplex, 
kw fm amplifier and transmitter. 
— stl units, fm — mtl units, fm/am/ 

audio console, fm Serrosoid ® Te- 
nement modulator for fm/fm ste- 

and multiplex use — for modern- 
g Western Electric and other old- 
fm transmitters, fm Serrosoid ® 
acement modulator for modern- 
g DuMont tv transmitters. These 
ipments contain features well ac- 

ed by the broadcasting industry. 
le famous by the standard elec- 
iics line of tv equipment such as 
-a-unit, patchover, space saving, 
liomical operation, low tube cost 
l>ng tube life. 

R • 2 APRIL 1960 



TELECHROME MFC. CORP. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 20 

28 Ranick Dr. 

Amityville, L. I., N. Y. 

Representatives at convention 
J. R. Popkin-Clurman 
H. Charles Riker 
E. B. Herman 
Dave Chapman 
Don Dudlev 
S. S. Krinskv 
Ray Wulfe 

Products 

Telechrome will demonstrate a 
number of its latest equipment with 
extensive applications in the fields of 
color tv, broadcast equipment, three 
new types of studio cameras, video 
transmission facilities, testing and 
telemetering, with a complete line of 
transistorized power supplies featur- 
ing: 1. Model 490A. Special effects 
generator with joy stick control for 
wipes and matting. For use in mono- 
chrome and color tv with live video 
tape film programing. 2. New 4 1 /2 " 
image orthicon camera, studio vidi- 
con camera, 3-V color camera, fea- 
turing fast warm-up, super stability, 
low-light level sensitivity. 3. Model 



1008A. Vertical internal tesl signal 
keyer. \<>u signal for testing and 
control during programing m 

chrome and color tv. 4.Model 1003D. 
Video transmission test signal gen 
erator — the only portable and stand 
ard rack mounting unit which pro 
duces multi frequency bursts, stair 
steps, modulated stair step, window 
signals, including composite sync. 
The precision test signal generator 
produces composite television wave 
forms for measuring amplitude vs. 
frequency, differential amplitude \s. 
amplitude, dynamic linearity, differ- 
ential phase vs. amplitude, high fre 
quency transient response, low fre- 
quency phase or streaking, smears, 
mismatches, etc., of individual units, 
amplifiers, cables, etc.. in all parts of 
the tv system from the studio thru 
all local facilities, including the trans- 
mitter. Portability makes the model 
1003D ideal for checking facilities 
anywhere designed for video tape 
testing. 5. Model 1005SA1. A new 
high quality portable sync generator, 
featuring magnetic core binary coun- 
ters, delay line governed. 6. Model 
1073D1. Simwindow generator — a 
new portable test unit which produces 
a new type of wave form for testing 




an\ pari or all of a t\ pulse System 
for amplitude and phase character- 
istics "go-no-go" indication simplic- 
ity. 7. Model HK)7B. Portable video 
transmission tot signal receiver for 
precise measurement of differential 
phase and differential gain. 

Other featured equipment will be 
the chromoscope (Vector display) 
which provides differential phase 
measurements to .01°. envelope de- 
lav curve tracer, chromolizer i port- 
able color signal generator t . and new 
polaroid camera equipment for check- 
ing and recording differential phase, 
multi burst, amplitude and window 
signals. 

TELECONTROL CORP. 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 44N 



Representatives at contention 
John W. Doering 
Lerov Jorgenson 

Products 

Video-audio distribution systems. 
studio video switching systems, mas- 
ter control switching systems. 



TelePrompTer CORP. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 22 



Representatives at convention 
Irving B. Kahn 
Hubert J. Schlafly 
William Sargent 
E. J. Spiro 
Ted Atwood 
Joseph Munisteri 
Ted Boisumeau 
Joe Kovalchik 
Brad Macy 

Products 

Manufacturers and suppliers of 
equipment and services for television 
stations and networks, motion picture 
studios, public speakers, conventions 
and group communications. Products 
and services to be displayed include: 

1. The TelePrompTer Model \ cuing 
equipment, featuring selector dual 
hand control, ring control, foot pedal, 
tellens adapter and new accessories. 

2. The new TelePro 6000 rear screen 
projection system with 65 slide-per- 
minute changer, short throw, com- 
plete remote control, dramatic light 
power, new automatic dowser. 3 NeM 
single contact 12 channel TeleMation 

Automation of pre-set effects through 



TelePrompTer equipment. Space- 
saver. 4. Various control modules. 



TELESCRIPT-CSP, INC. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 8 



Representatives at convention 

Robert Swanson 
Curt Howard 
Peter Jackson 
Trig Lund 

Products 

Tv studio prompting equipment, 
rear screen projectors, edit pulse 
visualizer. polarization effects kit. 
Orbiters. 

TELEVISION SPECIALTY CO. 

DIV. OF FEDERAL MFG. & ENG. CORP. 
NORTH HALL— SPACE 43 N 
1055 Stewart Ave. 
Garden City, N. Y. 
Representatives at convention 
Howard Ryder 
John Schlageter 
Lawrence Scheu 

Products 

Television specialty company kine- 
scope recording cameras; transistor- 
ized 16mm S-O-F newsreel cameras, 
with portable power pack; 16mm 
film inspection equipment; 35mm 
cameraflex movie cameras. 

TOWER CONSTRUCTION CO. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 16 
2700 Hawlceye Dr. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Representatives at convention 
M. M. Lasenskv 
C. A. Wright 
G. S. Chesen 
A. C. Tilton 

Products 

Towers, am, fm, tv, microwave 
erection service. 

U. S. ARMY 

NORTH HALL— SPACE 42N 

Office, Chief of Information 
Washington 25, D. C. 

UTILITY TOWER CO. 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 4 



Representatives at convention 

C. E. Nelson 
Jerr) Nelson 
\. G. (Bud) Duval] 

Nathan Sholar 



Products 

Radio tower manufacturing 



VISUAL ELECTRONICS COR 

EXHIBITION HALL— SPACE 27 



Represent€tlives at convention 

James Tharpe 
Pat Gallagher 
Morris Mayers 
Bert Kupperman 
Cecil Grace 
Jim Sims 
Felix Bonvouloir 
W a\ ne Marty 
Dick Witkovski 
A. R. Hopkins 
A. W. Greeson. Jr. 
Al Kallman 
L. C. Radford, Jr. 
Leo Darrigo 
Robert Jonschur 
Robert Richards 
Mrs. Jess Rafsky 

Products 

Program automation for video 
audio systems featuring the "supe 
equipment from specialist manu] 
turers" which Visual sells nations 
\ isual Electronics' nationwide 
of field engineers will be on hano 1 
demonstrate equipment for all brc 
cast needs in the following categor! 
Tv area — visual automation systq 
TARC switchers and plug-i 
form monitors, power sources 
transistorized power supply syst 
Mackenize program repeater 
FAVAG master studio clock sysj 
GPL high resolution vidicon filn 
tern. COXRAC picture monitor 
1. VSTMAN 16mm tv project 
Smith-Florence Faultfinder, Pnx 
transmission line. Decca weather 
dar. Superior self normalling 
jack. Dynair video and R. F. di 
bution equipment. 

Am area — Continental transmil 
and remote control systems, brl 
cast electronics Spotmaster, AlteJ 
dio console, microphones. Nema 1 1 
monitors, field strength meter, 
fectone tape recorder. 

Fm area — GEL transmitters 
multiplex exciters, audiomation 
players for background 
Browning multiplex receiver ed 
ment. 



'i 1 • 36 i OPH ENTIOJi SP1 I i \l 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



Interview 



:b^?Jlyw^ 



Penick & Ford Advertising Manager tells why he chooses 
WLW TV Stations and WLW Radio for My-T-Fine Puddings and Swel Frosting Mix 




"The WLW Stations take 
the cake for offering advertisers 
the big 3 in broadcasting 
—PROGRAMMING, AUDIENCE, 
PROMOTION!" 




"This programming has helped 

give us a mighty fine position 

in the market and the loyal 

program audience helps create 

a loyal brand consumer." 





"And for the cherry on the 
cake, we welcome the Crosley 
Stations practical promotion 
and merchandising help." 



Call your WLW Stations' Representative . . . you'll be glad you did! The Dynamic WLW Stations 



of Avco 






Crosley Broadcasting Corporation a division 



"Who'd think you could 

do it 720 different ways 

in 720 minutes!!!" 





i 



"MUSOjJNECASTER" ... the greatest innoval 

Mdio programing since jingles ... at C.R.C.'s s 
e Sheraton - BlackStOne Commercial Recording Corporij 

P.O. Box 6726 3104 Maple, Dallas 19, T| 

• your own customized jingles sing the time Tom Merriman, president • Bo " 

• automatically cues the tape to the exact minute Dick Morrison, vice pres, gen. 



PON SO R ASKS 

Continued from page 53) 

'bnt expect it to substitute for good 

raining. It can't. But it can and 

mid convey the specialness, the 

lity of your programing. If it 

do this, it will have done its job. 

[liott M. Sanger, Jr., promotion 

manager, WQXR, New York 
lEverv once in a while, someone 
to me, "I wouldn't think 
have to promote WQXR. 



We tell 
advertisers 
how we are 
^erent 



iesn't evervone know alout it?" 
It is true that WQXR is widely- 
own, both along Madison Avenue 
d among a vast number of literate 
dio listeners in and around New 

k. Yet there are still misconcep- 

is about WQXR. 
You could gather from the fore- 





Meet 

HcGAVREN TV 



yehm 



ton {yteafo 



'■tfn/a/m, 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT 
IAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SEATTLE 

: 0R FACTS ABOUT NATIONAL SALES 

. . ask the man who knows! 



at the 

d ! EXECUTIVE HOUSE 



kAREN F. McGAVREN, President 
IEN JOHNSON, Executive V.P. 

N.A.B. CONVENTION 
April 3rd thru 7th 



going that perhaps our promotion — 
at least our sales promotion — is de- 
signed to educate. Well, perhaps it is. 
We think we are different from other 
radio stations and we like to tell ad- 
vertisers why we think so and why 
our kind of broadcasting and our 
kind of audience is valuable to them. 
We know that our classical music 
format appeals to people who have 
higher incomes and better education 
and who thus represent an important 
segment of the rich and huge New 
York market. And we believe this 
audience can best be reached through 



certain techniques that have proved 
successful for many WQXR adver- 
tisers. 

While our promotional "story" 
may be different from that of many 
stations, the techniques we use in dis- 
seminating it are quite standard. We 
issue a regular flow of direct mail 
brochures, research material and 
press releases; we use some trade pa- 
per advertising, and we are constant- 
ly asked by our sales staff to prepare 
presentations for specific accounts. 
In all of this, we hammer hard at the 
theme of WQXR's "uniqueness." ^ 



■ ■*? 



• the •,• , 

j3 nations 

finest 



eonrmerciai 
atmosphere •'. -j 



HIGHLY-RATED 
PRESTIGE* 




adult Radio 



MINNEAPOLIS -ST. PAUL 

William V. Stewart 
Nationally represented by 

Daren F. McGavren Company 



2 APRIL 1960 



PROGRAM CONTROL 

i Continued from page 37 ' 

there's a danger that it might he 

removed and topple the others. 

There are really only two things 
that might he said against network 
control: (1) That it encourages 
Washington to breathe still harder 
down network necks, and 1 2 1 that 
the past track record for wholly de- 
veloped and produced net shows 
hasn't always been the greatest: they 
frequently bomb or fail to sell out. 

Agencv sponsor interest in con- 



troling a show goes back many years 
to the days when practically every 
big network radio show was the chat- 
tel of a JWT, BBDO or B&B. Agen- 
cies bought scripts, cast and produced 
shows, wrote talent contracts, pub- 
licized stars. Radio networks sold 
time, supplied studio facilities. 

The pattern — or at least the desire 
for this pattern — followed into tv 
M hen it came along. But as tv shows 
became more spectacular and much 
more expensive, agencies began relin- 
quishing more of their "control" to 



Now for the First Time, 

Every Independent Station 
Can Own the All-New 



ANIMATION PROJECTOR 



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quickly, easily . . . without costly 
motion picture film ... as used 
successfully by all the national 
networks since 1954. Cellomatic's 
new projector, to be shown for 
the first time at the NAB Con- 
vention, brings this equipment 
within every TV station's budget 
. . . for newscasts, commercials, 
weather shows, sports round-ups 
and general programming. Be 
sure to see our exciting demon- 
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L 



Model 45: one of three 
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See our Full Line of 
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CeMnwfia 



CORPORATION 



the networks I or bought pack 
from producersi as an easier wai 
get quality shows without having 
turn into production collossi. 

Actually the whole idea of agej 
show control was a sharp depart 
from advertising practices and <J 
radio brought it about. In ma 
zines. the advertiser was respons 
only for the space he bought— 
for the editorial content of the p; 
around him. In radio, he suddi 
became responsible not only for 
commercials but for the enter! 
ment that surrounded them. A lr 
clients and agencies liked the i 
and still do. In a recent TV Gi 
story. Chuck Crowley, tv man; 
Du Pont. said. "We consider ou 
programs to be our personal cal 
cards to the public and we feei 
want to be able to say what 
those cards." Many other ad 
and agencymen are reluctant to % 
production reins to a network or 
side producer. But in recent y 
there's been a drift toward cor 
shared by sponsors, nets, produ< 

The present climate in Washing! 
however, has raised the issue a< 
Now it appears many agencies 
advertisers would be glad to see 
nets take over the biggest shan 
control — including answering o 
tions from Congress. But hen 
where a schizoid tendencv slips 

"Once the gale in Washin: 
blows itself out," one adman 
SPONSOR, "for how long do you tl 
agencies will want to see nets in 
tually full control? You can't 
vorce advertising from the hu 
equation, and everyone likes to 
a pat on the back. Remember 
many an agency has built quil 
reputation through picking or ' 
troling" a high-rated tv progi 
They can lose their bargaining pi 
with a client if the network get- 
show credit. The client may 
that old 'So whattaya do for 
15$ V question." 

Other admen expressed the 
doubts about agency willingne-s 
let the nets run too far with the 1 
Not only may they lose credit fc 
hit show, but they risk considers 
on a flop. For too long, age 
have been identified in the trade 
tv shows, and even if they shout 
ly that they had nothing to do 
the production of a net-cont: 
show, they are in danger of 1 
partly blamed for it anywa>. 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



We of BMI are proud to receive this honor. 



AN APPRECIATION 



AHO P ftLL TYPES- OF MUSIC. 

It has sought them out in every corner of the country. 

'-: -/' : - ■■■:■■■.,■■■•■' ■ = ;■■•-■■. ::^ .•■:■'■■■,'.■■,,:■-.:■: "•:: . 
AND S R. 

And surably 

IUSIC. 

■■- :■'■■. ■■,.';■'.:■-.;; ,,v.v : 

'V'- ■:;■::: ■■■■■ ■;■;:■ ; :■:, : ^r. : .■;;.;■..■.■■. ; -■ 
: ■.■■■■■y-::- : : -^; -.v. k thf 

-. : ^ ^ - •■^FfV 

^' ;.;::.: ■ -i r-.V; ■■; w..-. ;; ; ;m : ; .on. us 
OFFICERS, DIRECTORS AND EMPLOYEES. 

FROM THE FAMILY OF 

B. M I 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS. AUTHORS AND COMPOSERS 



Broadcast Music, Inc. 



589 Fifth Avenue 



New York 17, N. Y. 



BXSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



BABIES 

i Continued from page 45 I 

"We think we're reaching new 
mothers as soon as they're home from 
the hospital. They're not running 
around or doing too much housework 
for a while, and we've scheduled com- 
mercials to run once every hour 
between 10:15 and 3:45." 

The Heinz tv package was bought 
only seven weeks ago. and accounts 
for about 25% of the total ad budget. 
Heinz and Gerber are unique in their 
distribution in that both are national. 
Most of the others are regional. This 
is why network patterns aren't as 
suited as spot to many companies. 

Clapp's baby foods, for example, 
still relies most heavily on "personal" 
contact at the local level and on print. 
Its a regional brand but has two 
unique advantages over the competi- 
tion, says Frank L. Henderson, v.p. 
and account supervisor at SSCB. 

"We're a penny less than competi- 
tive brands, and we're the first baby 
food on the market (1921)." 

The marketing problem he sees: 
"Isolating the actual prospect — the 
pregnant woman or the new mother 
— in buying the coverage of anv me- 



dium." He sees a considerable waste, 
but suspects that much circulation 
which seems to be waste is actually 
contributing to sales by influencing 
the mother. In his opinion, the super- 
market is the most influential outlet. 

The drugstore, of course, is the 
best retail outlet for the toiletries and 
sundries manufactured for babies. 
One of the biggest items — accounting 
for about $57 million a year in sales 
— are diapers and baby pants. One 
of the biggest producers is Playtex, 
handled by Reach. McClinton, agency. 

Some of the special marketing 
problems, as outlined by account 
supervisor Eernard M. Lewy: "Only 
about 20% of all women use diaper 
services, and this is our potential 
market. But a diaper service is usual- 
ly less expensive than constant use 
of our Dry per would be (some $3 a 
week), so we stress use of these dis- 
posable diapers while traveling." 
Playtex and Johnson & Johnson domi- 
nate the disposable diaper market, 
with about 45% of the sales for each. 
Kleinert is top seller in the pantie 
field. 

Playtex, owned by International 
Latex, uses heavy spot tv in more 
than 100 major market areas only, 



NO. 
DENVER 



KBTV 



e 

CHANNEL 



1 

R 

Q 



6 out of the top 10 programs are on KBTV! 

Greatest share of audience from 3 P.M. to 

sign off! 

Greatest number of homes reached from 

3 P.M. to sign off! 

The figures are in . . . and they conclusively prove that 

for the second straight rating period . . . Channel 9 is 

the top station with Denver TV viewers. 

Great ABC-Television network shows, powerful local 

programs combine with KBTV's "perpetual promotion" 

to place Channel 9 in this number one position. 

HOW CAN YOU COVER THE DENVER MARKET 

WITHOUT KBTV? 



**,,.. 



Index For Den 



KBTV 



Call your P G W Colonel 



THE FAMILY / ^ 

STATION /CHANNEL * 



JOE HEROLD 



i 



supplemented with occasional ra^ 
— all scheduled on a barter bq 
with stations. Why tv? Mr. Le 
answers: "We prefer daytime, w] 
we reach almost all of our prospe 
if they're reachable by any medii 
And it gives us a greater spread.' 

Mennen Co. is using tv for 
first time with a daytime net sched 
(see chart, page 45) aimed at yoi 
women, pregnant women and moth 
with / Love Lucy on CBS TV. 

Mennen's account supervisor 
Grey agency has scheduled comrc 
cial mentions for the lotion, pow» 
and oil with copy carrying strc 
emotional appeals. In his opini 
"Women in the early stages of pr 
nancy are still involved with th 
owm needs. They're concerned ab 
the loss of the figure, yvhether they 
still attractive. But about the seve: 
month of pregnancy they r switch I 
focus of attention to the baby, z 
are concerned with its needs and 
future." The latter stages of pi 
nancy are when he thinks the stroi 
est sales appeal can be made. 

In Mennen commercials wrii 
play down the actual reminders' 
hospitals and the birth process i 
emphasize mood and the happir] 
after the baby is born. Women < 
proaching childbirth "are tense i 
anxious, and they don't like to I J 
reminded of it," he says. 

Mennen also attempts to estabj] 
a company image "of quality 
product and authority as a ma)| 
facturer in the baby care field, J 
feeling of humanity and charm. I 
want women to accept the fact ifl 
our baby products do more 
just perform the functions expeoJM 
of them and to think they hav« 
built-in product performance ad^ai 
age." And tv seems the best mdM 
for getting the message across becaH 
"readers aren't necesarily viewH 
and we're trying to reach as ml 
voung women as possible at the int 
efficient cost with an exciting, m 
matic message." 

There are common themes in tfl 
the print and the broadcast copyw 
most of these baby product (M 
panies. Response and attentive* 
is always high in pictorial preset 
tion of babies themselves. Also, rm 
of the companies combine pro« 
sell w ith subtle hints on how to M 
for a baby (Heinz), humor (aDrf 
jingle by Playtex, keyed to "How B 
I am"), mood (Mennen). 



Carbonated fun, sizzling excitement, pul- 
sating public service. ..these are the 
ingredients which give Crowel l-Col lier 

stations that frolicking, effervescent sound 
... a sound of complete freedom of expres- 
sion devoid of impediments that bind 
creativity so necessary to keep a radio 
station dominant in its market. 
Crowell-Collier fun-excitement-public serv- 
ice programming is aimed at the warm, fun- 
loving hearts of the people. No attempt is 
made to cover up the natural, warm feeling 
generated by Crowell-Collier air personnel. 
This freedom of expression then is the 
element which provides the fun-excitement- 
public service ... the distinguishing facets 
of Crowell-Collier programming. 



UNINHIBITED 





MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL 



KEWB 

SAN FRANCISCO/OAKLAND 

Milton H. Klein, Gen. Mgr. 

Natl. Sales Reps: 

he Katz Agency, Inc. 



KFWB 
LOS ANGELES 

Robert M. Purcell, Gen. Mgr. 
Natl. Sales Reps: 
John Blair & Co. 



''first in contemporary communication^ " 
CROWELL-COLLIER BROA: 



Robert A/. Puree . Director 



ONSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



103 



From 5:30 to 10:00 a.m., WRC's Al Ross gives Washington listeners what they want. Ross' early morning music and news pri 
"Your Timekeeper," consistently attracts the largest morning audience in the Capital area. And WRC goes right through 
providing the special sounds of local news, adult music, regular traffic and weather checks . . . plus . . . nation-wide and wori 
reports from the largest broadcast news organization in the world. Result: WRC delivers the buying public throughout the 
politan coverage area. The Capital wakes . . . and stays . . . with WRC because WRC is tuned to THE SOUND OF THE Sli 

WRC • NBC OWNED • 980 IN WASHINGTON, D. C. • SOLD BY NBC SPOT SA' 




What's happening in V. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



2 APRIL I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

IBLICATIONS INC. 



Politicians as a rule don't like polls hence there shouldn't he any surprise 
in the announcement of the Harris Legislative Oversight subcommittee that it's 
laying a foundation for probing tv rating methods. 

The group has hired the American Statistical Association to study the soundness of the 
various rating system and the ASA, in turn, has hired three outside experts. 

Says Harris: it appears that networks program their prime time in line with program 
ratings and so it is vital to find out how accurate they are in measuring the audience. 

Meantime the Harris subcommittee keeps working on bills to (1) initiate a code for 
regulatory agencies; (2) regulate networks; (3) make it more difficult to sell stations; (4) 
to get at payola, plugola and the rigged quiz situation. 

P.S.: Nielsen wired Harris that the experts must visit its Chicago plant. 



If you've wondered what positions can be expected from new FCC commissioner 
Edward K. Mills, Jr., the profile in that regard, for the moment, is rather misty. 

It's assumed, however, that after he's ploughed somewhat into the job his views on issues 
facing the commission will be easier to assess. 

These are the impressions gathered from what Mills has said so far in interviews: 

• He's firmly against censorship and holds that self -regulation is the best way to 
obtain program improvement — thus agreeing with all his colleagues. 

• He favors a stern attitude toward malpractices and off-the-record approaches to commis- 
sioners. 

As of now, he speaks in about the same terms as the majority and if it turns out that 
this is where he stands, his 15-month term will bring no changes in FCC direction. 

Democrats are apt to be satisfied that Mills term runs out next June, this allowing the one 
legally valid switch, in the event they take over the White House. 

Rep. Emanuel Celler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee introduced 
a bill to make payola a federal crime. 

Another bill would give the FCC authority to issue conditional one-year licenses to 
stations which offend. 

The FCC moves quietly ahead with its slightly tougher attitude, even in ad- 
vance of a formal decision on its own powers to intervene with respect to station 
programing. 

Now another station, KDB, Santa Barbara, Cal., has had its license renewal held up for 
failure to match program performance with promise. Two of the four Boston stations held 
up principally on payola allegations also had the program issue raised. 

The networks, some multiple owners ami some individual stations joined in 
unanimous protest to the FCC over the payola and plugola directive. 

The FCC holds meetings on whether the ukase went too far or whether it should be held in 
abeyance temporarily, pending hearings. 

The industry said the FCC's goal of eliminating the malpractices was laudable but 
that the commission is going too far. Free records, payments of trip expenses of station 
personnel for people merely hoping the stations will consider a development newsworthy, pay- 
ment of remote expenses, etc., are all customary business practices and not reprehensible, it 
was argued. 



• 2 APRIL 1%0 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



*■ FILM-SCOPE 



The first golf series to go into syndication is Walter Schwimmcr's Top I 
Golf: repeat plays of All Star Golf are coming off ABC TV. 

Seven stations have signed so far for three years of the syndicated series, 26 episodes I 
series. They are: WOR-TV, New York; KHJ-TV, Los Angeles; KTVU, San FranciJ 
WXYZ-TV, Detroit; WMAL-TV, Washington; WTPA-TV, Harrisburg, and KLYD-TV, Bl 

ersfield. 



CBS Films has sold its Robert Herridge Theater series to the Australian Br< 
cast Commission (6 stations) to start 1 July — which is the height of the wintei 
season in Australia. 

This, the first sale on the complete series, unravels an unusual sales pattern for a sh»| 
An international sale prior to a domestic one. 

The deal is for two runs of 26 episodes. 
Previously, individual episodes were taken from the series for sales in Germany, Swal 
and Denmark. 



Sara Lee foods (C&W) has picked up half-sponsorship of Play of the W| 
on WGN-TV, Chicago, to introduce a new frozen chicken product. 

Their strategy appears to be this: Use a quality show to sell a high-price brand 
Sara Lee, incidentally, sells its bakery line fresh in Chicago and frozen in other marl 
the new product will be the first frozen item it will sell in Chicago. 



: 



Westinghouse will announce at the NAB convention that it is making availa 
a series of media promotion spots to all stations without cost. 

The film spots, a series of animations in 10, 20 and 60 second lengths, have the them( 
usins tv to promote tv. 

Intercontinental TV has put its second mobile tape recorder to work in Euro 

One unit will produce tape in Rome for the Today show while another is in Paris, Mui 
Salzburg and Venice for the Pat Boone Show. 



MCA's Johnny Midnight scored a number of ratings successes in premieiej 
the past few weeks, demonstrating that midseason starts aren't necessarily a hal 
cap to a new show. 

The show has already premiered in around 30 markets: the first three ARB report: 
ceived are the following: 

CITY STATION RATING SHARE 

New York WRCA-TV 21.8 33.9% 

Cleveland WJW-TV 16.7 32.3% 

Portland. Ore. KGW-TV 23.0 40.4$ 

What's unusual about the New York ARB above is that Johnny Midnight's first rail 

was the highest syndication score in the market, traditionally a very tough one for sy« 

cation ratings because of seven-station competition. 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Syndication's continuous need for shows that can deliver a masculine audience 
is being met by Ziv's Home Run Derby at the moment. 

The sports series, now sold in 87 markets, lists among its advertisers Consolidated Cigar, 
International Harvester, and several breweries, including Schmidt, Schlitz and LaBatts. (For 
details, see FILM WRAP-UP, page 114.) 



ntroduce a system for pre-testing 



NTA-Telestudios is the latest company 
commercials and tv programs. 

TAR — Television Audience Research — is the name of the new method, which will util- 
ize in-home testing. Research analysis will be done by Blankenship, Gruneau & Ostberg. 

NTA-Telestudios intends to make the service available to the entire industry and claims 
higher validity for it than present testing services provide. 



William Van Praag has pointed an admonitory finger at agency producers for 
some of the commercials difficulties in recent months. 

His statement was: "If the agency producer could have performed in his proper capacity, 
the industry might not be subject to the unfavorable publicity and the FTC hassle 
it is experiencing today." 

These remarks were disclosed through Marc S. Asch, executive v.p. of Van Praag, at a 
talk last week before the Chicago Agency Broadcast Producers Workshop. 



Eastman Kodak is introducing film devices which apply broadcast develop- 
ments directly to the consumer market. 

A new 8 mm sound projector, although designed for home use, may be applied to very 
inexpensive business films and presentations — or for making low cost copies of 16 mm 
films. 

Still another possibility is introducing sound in the 8 mm home cartoon market, a field 
that several syndicators have already entered. 

The new device utilizes a magnetic recording strip on 8 mm film. 



Midwest commercials production is getting a boost from a talent directory on 
video tape made by Giantview TV in Detroit. 

Some 100 local actors, actresses, models and announcers appeared on sample reels de- 
signed to expedite casting and encourage local production. 

This talent directory, said to be first of its kind, will be available to agencies and film 
producers 15 April. 

Robert Lawrence Productions has extended a blanket invitation to its com- 
mercials talent to use its executive dining room. 

The idea behind the move is to allow agency men to meet the people who actually per- 
form their commercials before the cameras. 

Several performers — accustomed to the idea of having to appear to promote products that 
they sell — inquired if they'd have to wear special costumes, but were surprised to discover 
the arrangement is strictly informal. 

The dining room has become a conversation piece within the trade. 



• 2 APRIL 1960 



107 




PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trod* ttdk, 
trends and tips 



i for adm« 

SPONSOR HEARS 



2 APRIL I960 The agency business has cooked up a new quip lo describe the morale in 

cotyriiM ibm shop where an important account or two are shaky. 

sponsor It's this: They're walking around with their resumes in their pockets. 



The recital of this past week's episode may serve to prevent any more tehj 
graphed business inquiries going, in error, from NBC TV to ABC TV. 

ABC got one from an agency, marked "attention: Don Durgin," asking what wa 
available 10 p.m. Monday, Wednesday or Friday, with the program to be mutually a«j 
ceptable. 

Durgin got a call from one of his former ABC sales associates thanking hin 
for giving him a hand on the sale. 

In withdrawing from the Pepsi-Cola account sweepstakes, NL&B may haw 
had other cause than it was bucking a tough field. 

A Michigan Avenue speculation: Mars, Inc., NL&B's recent addition, may be plan 
ning to enter the carbonated beverage field in a stroke toward product diversification. 

Tv program titling appears to be going more and more avidly for digits 

there'll be at least six shows with numbers in their titles on the air this fall. 

The sextette: Route 66, Surf side 8, 77 Sunset Strip, 21 Beacon, Rescue 8 am 
Coronado 9. 

Libby-Owens-Ford (F&S&R) will hold off making any tv commitments foj 
next season until it's settled its embarrassment with the FTC. 

It had to do with charges that those distortion-proof commercials were taken throug 
open auto windows. 

You can now wisecrack about Madison Avenue being inclined to function in 
"ivory tower" and be close to the truth, in one respect : McCann-Erickson. 

The agency's heavy-thinking and dreaming offshoot, John Tinker & Partners, is la 
cated in the Waldorf-Astoria Towers. 

There they quarter in intellectual isolation, pondering out problems, ideas and campaig 
basics. The translation into action is done elsewhere. 

Don't be surprised if NBC TV outfoxes ABC TV AND CBS TV in the area d 
football. 

Two coups that NBC is working on: (1) the Big 10, and perhaps Notre Dame also 
breaking away from the NCAA-ABC package and going with NBC this fall; (2) getting th< 
rights to the Baltimore and Pittsburgh NFL games — which are not in the CBS nine-tean 
deal. 

ABC TV, yielding to the expected pressure, has been liberally passing out raft 
raises to affiliates. Notes an ABC official: "even when these increases go into effect this fal 
we'll still have a $10,000 differential under NBC and CBS per nighttime hour and 
a lower cost-per-thousand. 

M'ONSOK • ^ APRIL 19l'4 



On The Gulf Coast 



THE BIG ONE 



Takes the Measure 




WKRGlV 



CHANNEL 5 MOBILE, ALA. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Representative, 
or C. P. Persons, Jr., General Manager 

^INSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



LEADING THE WAY with the first mobile video tape operation of any local tv station in 
Philadelphia, WCAU-TV set up unit to record Gene London's visit, astride elephant, to zoo 






HOOFING IT at KYW (Cleveland's "Kick Up Your Heels" party, which introduced the sta- 
tion's "Big K" promotion to agency executives) are (l-r) bandleader Sammy Kaye, songstress 
Kitty Kallen, Eve Riecz, Wyse Adv. Agency media director and Big Wilson, station personality 




ADVERTISERS 



The reason Jacob L. Barowsl 
gives for disposing of his phev : 
menally successful Adell Chei 
cal (Lestoil, Lestare) is -imp 
ihis: the inheritance tax. 

He figures his family and relatioj 
would have to ponv up at least 81 
million for such taxes, if the pljj 
remained in their hands. 

Under the outright sale to the Ni 
England holding company. Stands 
International. Barowsky retains msj 
agement control as long as he elecj 

The sale price was not disclosJ 
\dell's tv outlay last year: and 
$13.5 million. 

Shulton reports that it's alreal 
lined up 72 stations for its d<nj 
mentary. Race for Space. 

It's shooting for 95 stations. 

The hour film is to be aired I 
week of 24 April. 

Butlweiser, out of D'Arcy. 
Louis, is nlanning a big May ai 



ON-THE-SPOT COVERAGE is functio 
new telesign in South Bend's Times So 
erected by WNDU-TV. In addition to n 
casts, sign will be used for co-op advert ; 




MAKING TV STAR SALESMAN i 

cussed at recent Mpls. Adv. Club n 
Halsey Barrett (sec. from I), dir. tv sales t 
Katz Agcy. With him (l-r) Phil Hof. 
v.p.-g.m. (WTCN, Twin Cities); Dave Ab 
Katz; Bob Fransen, WTCN-TV u 




SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



e promotion, again using the 
as, "Pick A Pair Of 6-Packs." 
lajor market radio and tv will be 
;1. along with billboard and maga- 
:s. The entire promotion is based 
und point of purchase displays, 
'his promotional pattern has pro- 
ed outstanding results for Bud- 
in the past: In 1957 the 
lpaign sold 13 million 6-packs; in 

more than 20 million. 

npaigns: 
Comstock Foods has a spot 
o campaign scheduled in North- 
Ohio to promote its Complete 
Fillings. The promotion, to run 
four weeks, covers 36 announce- 
its per week on WHK. Cleveland : 
spots per week on WERE. Cleve- 
p; and 25 spots per week on 
PI). Toledo and WAKR. Akron. 

Chun King Corp. is doubling 
previous ad budget and is spend- 
$3 million on its present adver- 
ig and merchandising campaign 
ntroduce its American-Oriental 
ds line. The campaign, which be- 
i two weeks ago, uses spot tv in 34 



major markets. In addition to the 
spots, tv stations are running news 
paper mat advertisements calling 
sumers' attention to the commercials. 
Agency: BBDO. 

• Kitchens of Sara Lee, Chi 
go, will use one of the largest ad cam 
paigns in its history to introduce its 
new frozen main course, Chicken 
Sara Lee, to the Chicago area. Be- 
ginning next week, the product will 
be promoted via a strong tv and radio 
spot campaign using leading local 
personalities on each of the stations. 

FTC notes: Eversharp and its 
agency. Compton, have been 
charged, by the FTC, with using 
deceptive tv commercials for Schick 
safety razor which "unduly frighten 
prospective purchasers of competitive 
razors"' . . . Chemway Corp. has 
gi\en discriminators discounts to fav- 
ored retail purchasers of its Lady 
Esther cosmetics, according to an 
FTC charge. 

Trade pact: Bulova's wholly-owned 
subsidiary, Bulova International, 



Ltd., has entered into an agreement 
with Citizen Watch Co., Tokyo Eor 

the Japanese firm to ill produce for 
Bulova movements and complete 
watches for sale in the U.S. and Can- 
ada, and (2l become sole marketing 
agenl in Japan for watches made by 
Bulova in the U.S. and Switzerland. 

Kudos: The first annual Meril 
Ward Presentations of the New 
Haven Advertising Club went, Last 
week, to Bon-Core \\ ine foi local h 
advertising; A. C. Gilbert Co. and 
High Standard Manufacturing Co. for 
national tv advertising; and to Clii- 
eppo Bus Co. and J. Johnson \ Sons 
for radio advertising. 



AGENCIES 



Benton & Bowles is spreading its 
media department authority. 

At one fell swoop top media man 
Lee Rich this week appointed three 
assistant media directors. 

Thev are: Alan Harnell, Samuel 
Haven and Paul Roth. 




CHEESE+CAKE=CHEESECAKE 

WANE'S (Ft. Wayne) 
pretty Nancy Cowan, 



And that's what they hat 

■sary party, thanks to combinatic 

prom, secty., and decorated party < 



PPING ITS WIG with l/ 4 million volts, electrostatic generator on 
itinghouse Bdcstg.'s Lab 30 series bowing this week, is demonstrated 
|(l-r): pdcr. Ben Park, host Hugh Downs, scientist Dr. John Coltman 



BAT for spring baseball training activities at Dodgertown, WTVT 
npa-St. Petersburg) cameraman video tapes highlights of warm-ups 
intra-squad games telecast on CBS Sunday Sports Spectacular 





^ ***** 



NMM* % 



^*r* 



* 



igenej appointments: The Strom- 
berg-Carlson Division <d General D\- 

namics. from the Rumrill Co., to 
D'Arey for their commercial prod- 
ucts and electronics divisions . . . 
Afga. Inc.; Vrmoui Uliance Indus- 
tries; Mobaj Products Co.. and Otto 
Milk Co., to ketehum. McLeod & 
Grove . . . Carlon Products Corp., 
producer of plastic pipe, to Carr 
Liggett Advertising, Cleveland . . . 
United Packers. Inc.. Chicago pack- 
ers of Red Crown canned meat prod- 
ucts, to M. M. Fisher Associates, 
Chicago. 



In process of merging: Anderson 
& Cairns and James Thomas Chirurg 
Co. Joint billings: about $12 million. 

Kudos: Aver & Gillett Advertis- 
ing. Charlotte. N. C, walked off with 
10 of 24 possible places in the recent 
Advertising Institute competition held 
in Charlotte. 

They were named v.p.'s: William 
Nagler. at Y&R. Chicago . . . John 
Fogartv and Wilfred Lusher, at 
BBDO '. . . Joseph Stone, at Mc- 

Cann-Erickson l U.S.A. I . . . Michael 



SPemntA 



tfewmd 



n just 6 months! 




hat's the story of KSD0"s phenomenal 
climb 10 top-rankings in the wealthy 
San Diegp market! 

2ND. in Total Audience* - FIRST IN ADULT 
AUDIENCE -Xcommanding the attention 
of tens of thousands of discriminating, higher- 
than-average-income San Diegans who buy 
what they want, ancl can afford it! 

KSDO's tasteful programming surrounds 
your sales message witnxthe quiet dignity and 
bel ievabil ity that creates genuine desire . . . 
promotes sales . . . assuresVou of 
a big share of San Diego's miHti-million 
dollar annual shipping bill! 

lan-Feb. 1960 



FOR THE NATION'S 
19TH MAJOR MARKET' 



5000 watts at Aisle 1130 

Second at Broadway • San Diego, California 

Represented Nationally by Daren F. McGavren Co. 



' N GORDON BROADCASTING COMPANY 
KBUZ. Phoenix. Arizona . KSDO, San Diego. California . KBUZ-FM Mesa. Ari, 
"Americo's First Family of Fine Music Srorions" 



O'Connor, at Foote, Cone & Be! | 
ing. Chicago . . . Alton Farber. 
Mayer & O'Brien. Chicago. 

Add to admen on the mov< 
Ralph Trieger, to director of me< 
at R. Jack Scott Chicago . . . Dou 
las Manson, former New York 3 
vertising executive, has opened a p fi 
sonnel agency, bearing his name. 
New York . . . Howard Fisher, 
Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas . . . R; 
mond Reiss, to director of med 
for MacManus. John & Adams . 
Marie Fitzpatrick. to the Chiea 
office of Y&R . . . Harold Piatt. 
account supervisor for Purex Ccp 
and Armella Selsor, to media 
pervisor at Edward H. Wei?? ^ C. 
Chicago . . . E. A. Stockmar. 
media supervisor at Wade Advert] 
ing. Chicago . . . Marvin Seline. 
assistant account executive at Eai 
Ludgin & Co.. Chicago . . . Geor| 
Mott. account executive. SSCB. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



Some of the features and me* 
ings scheduled at the NAB coi 
vention in Chicago 3-6 April ii 
elude: 

• A full program of radio asset 
blies to kick-off Monday, with N 
v.p. for radio John Meagher presj 
ing at the opening session. 

• A Distinguished Service Aw; 
from the Broadcast Pioneers to 
presented to former President Harj 
S. Truman on Tuesdav during a 1 
quet in the Grand Ballroom of n 
Conrad Hilton Hotel. 

• A Fm Day program, to 
held Sundav in the Waldorf Room 
the Conrad Hilton. NAB fm rac 
committee chairman Ben Stri i 
i WWDC. Washington i will presi<i< 

• An annual membership meet 
of the Association of Maxinn 
Service Telecasters to be held Si 
dav in the Bel Air Room of the C 
rad Hilton. 

In memoriam: The Broadcasts 
Executives Club of New Engl 

will name its annual scholarships 
Harold E. Fellows Memorial Scht 
ships in honor of the reeenl 
ceased NAB chairman . . . The Tq 
nessee Association of Broadc 
ers has made a contribution to 
American Heart Association. W 

-l>n\?OR • 2 APRIL l> 




mttHar 



SERVES AGENCIES 

LARGE AND SMALL 

WITH 

QUALITY 

CREATIVE QUALITY 

PRODUCTION QUALITY 

REPRODUCTION QUALITY 

V 

TELEVISION COMMERCIALS " PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATIONS 



BUSINESS FILMS 



200 East 56th Street, New York 22, New York . . . MUrray Hill 8-0085 
16 East Ontario Street, Chicago 11, Illinois . . . WHitehall 4-5151 



nsor • 2 APRIL 1960 



ington office, in memory of Hal Fel- 
lows. 

The nominated officers for the 
Radio and I \ Executives Society 
include: president, Richard Salant. 
CBS; Lsl v.p., Robert Teter, PGW; 
v.p., Ernest Jahncke, Jr.. NBC; 
\.p.. David Moore, TTC; secretary, 
Mar\ Mchenna. Metropolitan 
Broadcasting: and treasurer. Ed- 
ward DeGray. ABC Radio. 



The syndication market for 
sports programing, hitherto de- 
prived of a full share of atten- 
tion, has been moving into the 
spotlight in recent weeks. 

Two of the sports shows now being 
sold in syndication are these: 

• Walter Schwimmer's Top Pro 
Golf (see FILM-SCOPE, page 106 I . 

• Ziv-UA's Home Run Derby, now 
sold in 87 markets. 

Sales: Latest Home Run Derby Sales 
are to WJAR-TV. Providence: KLIX- 
TV. Twin Falls: WLOF-TV, Orlando; 
WAGA-TV. Atlanta; KTVE. El 
Dorado; KFYR-TV. Bismarck; KDIX- 
TV. Dickinson; KETV, Omaha; 
WTYW. Evansville: WEAL-TV. Eau 
Claire; KTVH. Wichita; KMID-TV. 
Midland: KFSA-TV. Ft. Smith: 
WTVY. Dothan: WTIC-TV. Hart- 
ford; KOLO-TV. Reno: WRVA-TV. 
Richmond: WTOC-TV, Savannah; 
WTVT. Tampa, and WLLK-TV. 
Green Bay. 

The Ziv-Tv research unit has also 
prepared a study of sports in tv. 

More sales: MCA's Johnny midnight 
sold to Joseph Schmidt Brewers in 
two South Dakota markets. Gateway- 
Key-Little Markets in Kentucky, 
Parks Men's Wear in Oklahoma. 
Coca-Cola Distributors in Alabama, 
and Pfeiffer Brewing in three markets 
in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio; spe- 
cific markets and stations were not 
disclosed. 

International: The first purchases 
<>f I . S. t\ film programs by the new- 
commercial station in Hobart. Tas- 
mania I Australia I are a "roup of 12 
Screen Gems shows including Dennis 
the Menace, Huckelberry Hound, 
Father Knows Best, 1/"/' From Black- 
haul;. Rin Tin Tin and Rescue 8. 



Trade note: CBS Films scheduled 
sales meetings in New York for that 
staff, and in Chicago for all other 
salesmen on 31 March and 1 April. 

Production: Screen Gems will co- 
produce Sinbad the Sailor with 
Charles Schneer Productions; the 
half-hour series will be filmed on 
location in England. 



NETWORKS 



CBS TV Network will now have 
access to Paramount Pictures 
Corp.'s Hollywood production fa- 
cilities. 

The network, after signing an 
agreement with Paramount last week, 
is now planning to begin use of these 
facilities with the filming of Gun- 
smoke and Have Gun, Will Travel for 
the new season. 

ABC TV is offering a new public 
affairs series for sale: Campaign 
Roundup. 

Scheduled for Sundays, 4:30-5 
p.m., the series begins this week and 
runs through 6 November. It'll re- 
port and analyze the trends and de- 
velopments among the Republican 
and Democratic parties in key areas 
across the country. 

NBC's answer to "plugola": NBC 

has proposed that the FCC institute a 
rule-making proceeding to clarify its 
stand on sponsor identification for 
free records and the like. In the in- 
terim, the network is planning to 
purchase all records it acquires for 
use on its networks and owned sta- 
tions. 

CBS TV v.p. of sales administration 
William Hylan is sending to cli- 
ents, agencies and prospects a letter 
comparing the circulation, attention 
and advertising investments on tv with 
newspapers and magazines. 

Network tv sales and renewals: 
R. J. Reynolds I Estv l and Helene 
Curtis I McCann i this week assume 
alternate-week soonsorship of To Tell 
The Truth on CBS TV . . . Du Pont 
iBBDOl has renewed the June Ally- 
son Show for a second season on 
CBS TV. effective late September . . . 
Kaiser Industries (Y&R) has pur- 
chased the hour-lung Hong Kong se- 



ries to be scheduled next fall on A 
TV Wednesdays. 7:30-8:30 p.m. 
Best Foods (GB&B) in two w 
will alternate with Kellogg, on Dt 
the Menace over CBS TV. 



1 



Network tv sports sales : Ameri< 

Express Co. i B&B j and Travelers f 
surance I Y&R i will co-sponsor il 
Masters Golf Tournament on CB 
TV 9-10 April . . . Phillies Cij 
a renewal order, will sponsor half j 
each of the 50 Major League Basel* 
telecasts on NBC TV during the El 
season . . . Falstaff Brewing, Colgal 
State Farm Mutual Insurance Co. aJ 
General Mills will again sponsor t| 
Game of the Week on CBS TV tlj 
season. 

Network radio sales: Metropolis 
Life Insurance Co. (Y&R I will sp< 
sor one-quarter of News on the Hi 
over the entire NBC Radio netw< 
beginning 2 May. 

New network affiliate: WHDH-TJJ 
Boston, currently an ABC TV affi 
ate, joins CBS TV at the end of t 
vear. 



Thisa 'n' data: NBC TV pU 

three special programs to cover Pri 
cess Margaret's wedding, to be spc 
sored by the Frigidaire division '■ 
General Motors. The first telecast 
tentatively scheduled for 21 April . 
Capitol Cloakroom, CBS Radii 
oldest continuous public affairs int 
view program, celebrates its 13th i 
niversary this week . . . Kudos: C 
president Dr. Frank Stanton 
sented with the Award of Merit fr< 
the Industrv Film Producers Asso 



Network personnel notes: Fn 
erick Schuhmann, to director 
production services for ABC TV 
Ralph Mann, to director, NBC j 
ent and contract administration. 



RADIO STATIONS 



WBBM, Chicago, seems to hi 
tossed in the towel for its sej 
ate fin operation. 

\fter two years of lone fm exji 
mentation, the CBS o&o decided] 
go back to duplication. 

Sales were fairly good for th< 
arm. with some blue chippers 
as Buick. Steinway piano, Cin/a 



11 1 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL I'M 




J 



LIKE FATHER... LIKE S£N?... 
n the Land of Milk andXoney? 

ot on your life! In the past 30 years, the 
Wisconsin "Hayseed" has made way for the 
Veil-educated, well-heeled, well-dressed busi- 
ness man whose profession is farming. 
Is storybook stuff, this market of ours! . . . 
icores of small cities and thousands of big 
Jairy farms -400,000 TV families. 




Meet 
DAREN F. McGAVREN Co. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT 
SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SEATTLE 




FOR FACTS ABOUT NATIONAL SALES 
. . ask the man who knows! 



at the 

EXECUTIVE HOUSE 



DAREN F. McGAVREN, President 
RALPH GUILD, Executive V.P. 



N.A.B. CONVENTION 
April 3rd thru 7th 



While serving a single 
station market, WTHI-TV 
fulfills its public service re- 
sponsibilities in a way that 
has gained for it the appre- 
ciation and support of its 
entire viewing area ... a cir- 
cumstance that must be re- 
flected in audience response 
to advertising carried. 

Five full y 2 hours of local 
public service program- 
ming each week. 



WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 CBS • ABC 

TERRE HAUTE 




and a few national airlines as spon- 
sors. The fm advertisers are given 
the choice of switching to am or 
cancellation. 

RAB is planning what it terms 
the largest and most comprehen- 
sive series of Area Sales Clinics 
in the nine-year history of the 

event. 

The first of these clinics will be in 
New York. 20 April. From there 
they'll fan out over the next month to 
include 52 meetings in 35 key cities 
in the U.S. and Canada. 

On the f m front : Neighborhood 
fm stations in the Chicago area 
are turning more to live person- 
ality shows to serve the needs of 
their communities. 

The latest of these is radio tv per- 
sonalis Art Hern who starts his own 
hour-long show on WMTC. Palatine, 
this week. The show will feature local 
news personalities, suburban, social 
and economic affairs and issues. 

Ideas at work: 

• ESP contest: Jack Remington, 
d.j. at WKRC, Cincinnati, is offer- 
ing $1,000 to the listener who can 
guess what he's thinking. The idea: 
Remington has written, sealed and 
vaulted a familiar quotation and 
dailv. on his afternoon show, he takes 
a few minutes on the air to think 
about it. word for word. If the quo- 
tation is not identified over a four- 
week period, part of the money is 
turned over to charity and a new quo- 
tation-contest gets underway. 

• Taking a railroad for a ride: 
KEX. Portland. Ore., recently came 
to the aid of the zoo's attempts to 
construct a three-mile recreational 
railway. The problem: to raise more 
monev after an intensive two-year 
campaign. The idea: station staged 
and promoted a community dance. 
held simultaneously in three different 
ballrooms. As a special headliner at- 
traction, recording star Jimmie Rodg- 
er? headed a 45-minute show at each 
of these dances. Result: Station 
raised $3,000 for the Portland Zoo 
Railway. 

• Buried treasure: Art Ford, 
d.j. on WRCA. New York, a few 
weeks ago launched an informal con- 
test seeking unusual items. The win- 
ner, chosen last week, brought in a 
can of 50-year-old cocoa recently sal- 



vaged from food supplies origin? 
cached near the South Pole in 1! 
by famous Antarctic explorer C 
tain Robert F. Scott. Some of 
other items offered Ford: a two-nl 
submarine for $100,000; a circu 
fleas dressed in Mexican costu 
and a slightly-used trolley car. 

• Dial Your Voice gam 
KYOK. St. Louis, turned in thes-; 
suits to the recording game aired 
the station during a four-week per 
92 r 798 listeners called the station 
record their voices: 88.391 listei 
called back to identify their vo 
i which were aired over KXOK at 
rate of 14 per hour. 18 hours a da 
and 338 listeners identified tb 
voices within a specified time 
ment and were awarded major pr 

Not in the line of duty : Nig 
beat newswoman Louise Flint. 
K-FIY. Modesto. Cal.. last week 
ticipated in the news thuswise 
drunken gunman, holding two | 
dren as hostages, told the police 
rounding him that he'd only relq 
them to a woman. Mrs. Flint vo 
teered. approached the armed v, 
and after speaking to him. was 
lowed to return the unharmed i 
dren to the circle of patrol 
awaiting her. 



Thisa "n* data: WILK. Will 
Barre. last week joined the campa 
to raise monev for a new ambulai 
Within five hours after an appeal 
station's Jim Ward, some SI. 100 ] 
donated . . . New feature: W(J 
Pittsburgh, this week initiates its 1 
copter traffic service . . . KO 
Lodi. Cal.. as part of "Commui 
Service Week'" sponsored open he 
to acquaint the residents with its 
cilities . . . KMPC. Hollywood 
running 200 travelling bus displ 
to promote its "Most Happy Ra 
campaign . . . WW LP. Spring 
Mass.. celebrated its seventh anni 
sarv on the air with a special St. 
rick"? Day party . . . Selling i 
exposure: WKS'B. West Hart:'< 
Conn., has its salesmen, who 
allv cover the area in private aJ 
now equipped with station vehi 
which double as mobile news i 
and prime merchandising medi 
. . . Anniversary note: Exposit 
Fish Grotto this week signed 
its 33rd vear of consecutive a>l 
tising on KYA. San Francisco . 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 



DeTroiT... 

you know where 
you're going with 

WJBKJV 




LECTED 

a 

ANDSLIDE 

your 
3st customer 
"ie woman 
ewer) 



^ 



The 1960 Presidential race understandably is a major topic of conversation 
in Detroit as elsewhere. But in daytime television in Detroit, women 
viewers already have voted overwhelmingly for WJBK-TV. According 
to Nielsen's latest two-month figures, it's Channel 2 almost 2 to 1 over 
the closest competitor, with proportionately lower cost per thousand. 



Nielsen November-December 1959. 9 a.m. 

through 5 p.m. Station Share of Women Viewers. 

WJBK-TV 45.7% Station B 18.9% 

Station A 24.8% Station C 10.6% 



Call KATZ 
for the complete 
"Tabulation of 
Women Viewers" 



STORER STATION 

NSOR • 2 APRIL 1960 



CBS • CHANNEL 2 

117 



In celebrate it- fourth anniversary, 
KHFI-FM, \u>tin. will air a full <la\ 
of programs from the BBC. 

Kudos: To Will, VM- 1 \ . Philadel- 
phia, out of \twood-Richards, first 
award for outdoor advertising cam- 
paigns using 24-sheet poster and 
painted bulletins from the eighth an- 
nual Local Outdoor Advertising Con- 
tesl \ wards. 

Station staffers: Jerry Flesey. to 
general manager of KOIL-FM. Oma- 
ha .. . Chris Lane, to director of 
operations for KVA. San Francisco 
. . . Bob Leaeh, to head sales devel- 
opment at K-EZY. Orange County 
. . . Jay Sehiller. to research 
manager of RAB . . . George 
Beavers, account executive. WCBS. 
New York . . . Wes Giles, ac- 
count executive. WHLL Hempstead. 
L. I. . . . Edward McCann, Jr., 
regional account executive. W TAG. 
Worcester . . . George Kieffer. ac- 
count executive. KCMO-FM, Kansas 
Citv . . . James Babb, Jr., to re- 
gional sales manager and Clay 
Morgan, to the sales staff. \^ BT. 
Charlotte. N. C. . . . Arthur Sakel- 
son, to the sales staff at WBBM. 
Chicago . . . Don Hoyle, to account 
executive. KBON. Omaha . . . 
George Stump and John Pearson. 
to program directors, respectivelv- of 
KCMO-FM-AM. Kansas Citv . . . 
John Mareh. to sales representative. 
KYW. Cleveland . . . Harry Wil- 
liam, to sales and Bob Vaughn, to 
program manager. \^ SI N, St. Peters- 
hurg. Fla. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



The firm of Torbet. Allen & 
Crane, Inc. has been set up on 
the West Coast to take over rep- 
resentation contracts of stations 
previously served by the Robert 
Allen Co. and the Duncan Scott 
radio and tv division. 

TA&C will serve Venard, Rintoul 
^. \I< Council's radio and tv clients in 
the 13 western states, while the east- 
ern and midwestern offices of VR& 
McC will represent the new firms 
stations in their areas. 

Present TA&C operations include 
station properties in 25 states. 



FM Unlimited, a Chicago fin-only 
rep. is planning to get into pro- 
gram syndication. 

The reason: professional!) pro- 
duced program- on tape will enable 
both fm stations and their advertisers 
to offer specific features of special 
interest to their customers and pros- 
pert-. 

It will also provide tangible op- 
portunit] for merchandising and pro- 
motion — high!) impractical now with 
so manv of the stations using a 
straight music format and thus tend- 
ing to sound alike. 

Full details of the fan radio pro- 
gram syndication are to be revealed 
during the special fm convention in 
Chicago. 2-3 April. 

Avery-Knodel is distributing a re- 
gion-by-region guide enumerat- 
ing qualitative market character- 
istics. 

The study, designed primarily for 
the food and drug spot advertiser, 
pin-points pertinent data about the 
leading supermarket and drug chains 
in each market. 

Rep appointments: To Weed Ra- 
dio Corp., WHYE. Roanoke. Ya. : 
KLRA. Little Rock: and KUTI. Yaki- 
ma ... To Robert E. Eastman & 
Co.. WNOR. Norfolk. Ya. . . . To 
B-N-B. Inc. Time Sales, KORK. 
Las Vegas, for West Coast represen- 
tation. 

Rep appointments — personnel : 
Joseph Aley. to radio account ex- 
ecutive, and Leif Line, to the promo- 
tion and research department at The 
Branham Co. 



TV STATIONS 



Middle-income homes account for 
40% of tv viewing, reports TvB in 
a special study garnered for the 
Bureau by Nielsen. 

Some other highlights of the stud\ : 

• 31% of homes have an adult 
with a year or more of college. These 
higher-education homes account for 
32% of Jv viewing. 

• 23% of homes are large-famil\ 
home-, and account for 30% of all 
i\ viewing. 

• 34% of homes are young homes 
(head of household under 40 I and 



are responsible for 40% of tv 
ing. 

Nielsen is now sending to the tv 
onanists, a brochure dubbed Mea 
ing Tv's Audience. Reason: to 
cate them about tv ratings. 

Ideas at work: 

• See color in the dark : Wll 

T\ . New Orleans, televised win 
calls the first outdoor night 
broadcast, made during the 1 
Mardi Gras. For it. station used < 
eral Electrics new ""see-in-the-d. 
super-sensitne camera tube, know 
the type GL-7629. 

• Aiming for the hit para 
The theme music from the Alcoa 
sents tv series, sponsored by Ah 
num Co. of America i FSR i 
pressed on a long-playing record 
will be released for sales through 
ord shops across the country. 

Tv station acquisition: KSI 
TV. Salinas-Monterey and KSJ 

TV. San Luis Obispo, to The 1 
Harron-Gordon Gray group \ 
S3.1 million. The Harron-Grav gj 
own WKTY. Utica; WKAL. Re 
and World Broadcasting Systen 
New York. 

Progress report : W PIX. 
York, reports 1959 as the bigj 
revenue year in its 12-year hisl 
The figures: gross revenues wen 
19.2% over 1958 with net profit!* 
fore taxes increasing 23.4' '< . 

Thisa *n* data: TvB is planl 
17 Sales Clinics, devoted to local 
vertising. to open 3 May in Gn 
boro. N. C. . . . Top Ten Da 
Party, syndicated live tv series 
newed for 26 weeks by Royal Ci 
Cola and Castleberry Food on WJ 
TV. Augusta. Ga. . . . Anni 
note: WDSM-TV, Duluth. hi 
celebrating its sixth year wtj 
planned tour, dinner and part.i 
all couples in the area married I 
inii the first week of March. II 

On the personnel front: Jfl 

Ferguson, program director | 
sports director of WBRZ. 
Rouge, elected the outstanding s I 
caster of the \ear in Louisiana 1 j 
National Sportsw riter - Sj iortS' j 
Awards Committee . . . Mill 
Shan joins W1SVTY. Miluauk-j 
account executive. 



11!! 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL ■ 



in the PITTSBURGH AREA 

Take TAE 
I and See 

I' how you can buy blindfolded 

i and reach more homes for your 

| money during peak viewing 

hours. See your Katz man for a 

f demonstration. Or write WTAE 
for free "Blindfold Kit." 



wTae 

UUGH 

4 



bio mtmionJ^iH fin. 






ABC TELEVISION 





m U-*' 



WANT ACTION? 

FOLLOW ME 1 

I'll flash your sales message to 
73,496 square miles of the U.S.A. 
at one crack. It's the huge market 
called KELO-LAND. No one tv 
station could possibly reach it all — 
but my television booster hookup 
does. When your message beams 
on KELO-tv Sioux Falls, it beams 
simultaneously throughout 103 
• ounties of South Dakota, Minnesota, 
Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota. 
Remember— one rate card, KELO-tv, 
delivers it all. You get this 
tremendous action at lower 
cost-per-thousand. 

KELO-LAND 

KELO-tV Sioux FjIIs and boosters 
KDLO-tV Aberdeen — Huron — Watertown 
KPLO-tV Pierre — Valentine — Chamberlain 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKEt 




John H. Mitchell, v.p. in charge of 
AM-TV, San Francisco, has been app 
manager of the Central American Tv 
work. He joined ABC in 1953 as i 
charge of WBKB, Chicago. Later, Mi 
became v. p. -general manager of WAB' 
N.Y. In 1954 he was assigned to 
TV Network, and, in 1956, was name 
cial assistant to AB-PT president Lei 
Goldenson. In his new post, Mitchell will be in charge of tfy 
network which includes stations in five Central American coui 

Bryan Houston has been elected president 
of Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holden. 
He succeeds Fletcher D. Richards who will 
continue in the active management of the 
agency as chairman of the executive com- 
mittee. Houston had been vice chairman 
of the board and general manager of the 
agency since the merger of Bryan Houston, 
Inc. with FRC&H last July. Previously 
he had been chairman of the board of Bryan Houston. 1 
ton held key executive positions with Y&R. L&N and Pepsi-( 

Ralph W. Beaudin, general manajil 
KQV, ABC Radio in Pittsburgh, joins! 
Chicago, in the same capacity. (All 
cently acquired full ownership of Wljl 
a stock purchase from Prairie Farmeijl 
lishing Co.) Prior to joining KQV, I 
din was manager of WBNY, Bijfl 
Earlier, he had been with the sales dfp 
ments of KOWH and KOIL, both Ol 
Succeeding Beaudin as KQV general manager: John Gibbs. Hip 
formerly program and sales coordinator for the Pittsburgh stfll 

Alfred J. Jaffe, special projects editor 

of sponsor, has been named managing 

editor. He has been with the publication 

for nearly eight years, starting as a senior 

editor. A journalism graduate, Jaffe had 

a varied newspaper career on three dailies 

— the Philadelphia Record, Atlantic City 

Daily World and Brooklyn Eagle. He also 

spent some time free-lancing as a magazine 

writer. Jaffe holds a B.S. in journalism from Temple Uni\ 

Philadelphia, and an M.S. in journalism from Columbia Uni\ 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL 9t 







®m % TWMM CfrOUIEST OSEEH ! 



(and sheep and hogs, too!) 



I( j< Allow us to introduce three traveling representatives of the Kansas City Livestock 
Yards. These beauties and their fellow beasts still come about as close to being 
worth their weight in bullion as anything on the market. 

(f To talk to this $400,000,000 market, and the thousands of cattlemen who ship to 
the Kansas City market, the Kansas City Livestock Yards spends a major portion 
of its advertising budget on WDAF Radio. 

When you want to reach these thousands of stockmen with nearly a half billion 
dollars to spend (and the other folks with two billion to spend), don't you think 
you should use WDAF Radio, too? 



^ 



WDAF 610 RADIO* SIGNAL HILL • Kansas City, Mo. 

* SUBSIDIARY OF NATIONAL THEATRES & TELEVISION. INC / REPRESENTED BY HENRY I CHRISTAL CO . IN 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Are you using outdated facts in buying two-language markets? Too many 
timebuyers are, says Jack Roth, manager, KONO, San Antonio, Texas, and 
need to update this information in order to make iviser station buys. Roth 
believes that the time has come to re-evaluate the two-market situation "ac- 
cording to present day facts." Here's a frank, logical statement which chal- 
lenges the other side of the two-language picture, expressed by Sterling 
Zimmerman. KLPsO, Corpus Christi, Texas, in our issue of 6 February 



UNI-LINGUAL? BILINGUAL? Dl NG-A-LI NGU AL? 




I he many radio stations that broadcast in a market's 
"second" language loudly proclaim that to reach this "hid- 
den" audience, an advertiser must use their facilities. And 
v\ ell they should tell the world about it — it's their living. 
It ma) even be true in some markets. But it's time to re- 
evaluate this situation according to present-day facts. To 
do so, let's not quote the myriad listening figures available 
to everyone, instead let's take a simple, logical approach. 

In San Antonio land south Texas I consider that one of 
the oldest Spanish-language daily newspapers in the United 
States (La Prensa of San Antonio I went out of business 
not long ago. First, it went to a weekly, then it stopped 
publication altogether. More recently, a wealthy south 
Texas oilman bought it for a plaything, but it is now being 
published as a bi-lingual (every news item written in both 
English and Spanish, side by side). There is no other 
Spanish language newspaper in San Antonio. 

Consider that now onl) 3 of the 14 downtown and 
suburban "four-wall" movie theaters in San Antonio show- 
Spanish language films: another went out of business re- 
cently : and while another recently opened its doors, it's 
open onl) on weekends. Out of 18 drive-in movies in San 
Antonio, onl) 3 show Spanish language movies. One of 
these is closed foi the winter. And both of the other two 
-\\'<w English language movies as their second feature! All 
this in the midst of the best movie business San Antonio 
has evei known! 

Consider thai the onl) Spanish language television sta- 
tion in San Antonio i albeit a uhf) has reduced its entire 
programing schedule to two hours, 15 minutes a da\. 

Considei thai according to the most recent Hooper, the 



three Spanish language San Antonio radio stations h| 
combined audience of 4.3%. (One of the three ha< 
few listeners to rate. I 

So, what it boils down to is this: The Spanish speaj 
population is now almost completely bi-lingual! The\ 
English newspapers, go to English movies, watch Er 
television, and listen to English radio. 

Of the many reasons why this is so, here are two ii 
tant ones that you should know: 

1. Since just before World War II. it has been agj 
the law in Texas to speak Spanish in a Texas classrJ 
except when teaching Spanish as a language. 1 1 hen 
they have to learn English. I 

2. During the war, the Latin male became highly / 
cized due to his being in the Service. 

To summarize, the only age group of Latin Amei 
in San Antonio not now highly Anglicized are the i 
the old ones! And it is, therefore, no longer necessar 
an advertiser to buy a foreign language station to 
pletely cover the market in this city. One of the 
reasons we know that Latins listen to English lang 
radio is that on our station's phone-in contests, a he< 
percentage has Latin names. (This is where the "d 
lingual" in the title of this article comes from — in cas> 
were wondering ! I 

When you're buying San Antonio, and most South 
ern markets, you can buy dominance of all segments v 
market by buying the Anglo stations. 

It may be that this is happening to two-language ma| 
all over the country. Checked your buys recentl) ? 



122 



SPONSOR • 2 APRIL '. 




have you checked 
our pulse lately? 

WING 

I in DAYTON 

delivers more audience according to Pulse 
than any other station in Dayton ever has. 
Pulse for January, 6 AM to Midnight, shows 
| WING with 32% of the audience, and— as the 
graph to the right illustrates — WING is the 
only Dayton station with a consistent upward 
trend over the past year and a half. Hooper 
Index for December-January, 7 AM to 6 PM, 
shows WING with 29.8% of audience. Next 
closest station has 21.3%. Get the facts 
TODAY from your East/Man or General 
Manager Dale Moudy. 









1 












t 








uwilFi 




^STATI 
(IN 


ON E^ 

D.) 




T O N.O | 










M 




















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STATIOh 
(NET. 


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(IND.) - 






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- u 

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OCT. '59 - 
JAN. '60 



robert e. eastman & co., i 

national representative 



WCOL, Columbus: WIZE, Springfield, Ohio; WEZE, Boston; and WKLO. Louisville are also AIR TRAILS station* 

'OR • 2 april 1960 123 



SPONSOR 



The new FCC Commissioner 

The nomination by President Eisenhower of Edward K. 
Mills Jr. to fill the unexpired term of John C. Doerfer on the 
Federal Communications Commission occasioned some mild 
hosannas in the print media. 

According to the newspapers. Mills is a severe critic of the 
"crime, corn and commercials'' in current radio and tv, 
though, admittedly, he has no first-hand knowledge of the 
broadcasting industry. 

We, however, are far more impressed with the Mills repu- 
tation for integrity and hard work, and with his view that 
government commissions should follow the same canons of 
ethics observed by the judiciary. 

These are qualities which are valuable both to the FCC and 
to the industry. \\ e welcome Mr. Mills" nomination, and 
trust that the newspapers have greatly exaggerated his sup- 
posed hostility to the air media. 

Radio's timeliness 

At a round table meeting of the Radio and Television Ex- 
ecutives Society in New York last week. D. C. Marschner. 
sales promotion and advertising manager of Shell Oil, made 
an important, and sometimes forgotten, point about radio as 
a modern marketing tool. 

"Radio." said Marschner. "is the most timely of all adver- 
tising media." 

This factor of timeliness, of being able to reach prospective 
customers at or near the time when they are making actual 
purchases, gives radio a big edge in selling gas. oil, tires and 
other automotive products. 

Timeliness counts, too, in advertising all food and grocery 
items. Test after test proves radio's superlative ability to 
reach housewives at close to supermarket shopping periods. 

Modern radio is a powerful medium because it is local, 
personal, economical, universal. And don't forget to add — 
it is the most timely kind of advertising in existence. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: An end to the ''pa- 
perwork jungle" which still surrounds too 
much spot radio and spot ti buying and selling. 
Spot must free itself of needless and costly 
forms, procedures and organizational red tape. 



10-SECOND SPOTS 

Captive audience: New York 
people, long accustomed to cut oui 
the middle of presentations or 
views, got a surprise the other 
when Westinghouse Broadcasting ] 
miered its new science tv series 
The Four Seasons restaurant, 
in the screening room, they 
fascinated as the screen came >k 
— completely blocking off the doot 

Magic: From V. Y. Herald Tnb 
—''Bay Shore, L. I.. Mar. 14— Ev 
time Edward McBride, a patienl 
the Southside Hospital, pressed 
button on his spray can of air fn 
ner, the channel changed on his 
mote-control tv set." At last! A tfu 
ing mans spray can. 

Visiting fireman: Yisiting Chid 
for an NAB Comention. a South 
station manager dropped into a 1 
bershop for a shave and manicure, 
manicurist looked good to I 
"Honey chile," he said to her, "» 
you all say to you and me settir' 
to this here town tonight?" 

"But, sir." said the manicurist 
happen to be married." 

"Well," the broadcaster said. I 
just tell your husband you're i« 
to be late tonight." 

The manicurist thought it 
replied, "You tell him. He's sh. 
you." — Lou A. Wilson. 

Post-Paddy: Random sampling 
March off Madison Ave. In G; 
City, NY.. WLIR-FM went WLI, 
on commercials for the "Long In 
Railroad"' ... A N.Y.C 
paper carried heading "Irish P< 
Likely to Get Good Weather - '! 
snowed and poured rain'i . . . 
an adman wit came up wit 1 
dreamed I marched in the St 
rick's parade in my Erin Go Bn 

Using the bean: Louisville, 
grocery store managers receive 
following letter recently: "Witl.ii 
next few days, you will receivfl 
envelope from Radio Station 
which will contain Nescafe 
Beans. ... If you are the i 
recipient of an envelope contai 
43 beans . . . you will be awaidj 
new Sunbeam Shavemaster 
with the compliments of Nesca e 
WINN . . ." We got 44 bears 
ice throw one away and collect* 

SPONSOR • 2 APRIL J 



1 



"WEAU-TV 



sells to one of the richest farm 
areas in the country, where thousands of farm 
families and more than two million cows create 
a constant demand for drugs, machinery, 

equipment and buildings to keep Wisconsin's 
richest industry growing." 




EAU CLAIRE 



you can use 



In Jacksonville, only WFGA-TV | 
programs the best of K.w 
networks . . . NBC AND ABC . . 
to give Jaxons the finest in tele- 
vision viewing. By combining the 

top shows from both net 

WFGA-TV gives the vi 

they 

want ._ . 

That's why more and 
in the total television w «. 
aking the switch to WFGA-TV. 



icts 



are using our top progra 

to give their sales a Sunday Punch 




-T 



A C K S N V I L L E , FLORIDA 

The Best of NBC and ABC . . . Call Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 




• APRIL I960 
«0< • copy « $6 «• y«ar 



SP 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 







Louis W . Williams. Merchandising IW, t„r 

Sandra Hainlev, his ass^rtatr; «. \\~. tfnli. 

food merchandising; Robert IVtulvef. in-u.«v 

liaison; Phyllis dePew. dernon'straloiC'Virtfn'h. 

liner, CC \ director: Bem.ce Sra-rtf. sS&ticM; 




Only on WXEX-TV* Richmond's 
#1 Merchandising station 



fiEXpeditionary force: seven full-time mer- 
fusing specialists who give you more exposure, more push, 
milling power per ad dollar because they work with the stores 
ne your product. Here's how: Community Club Awards. In- 
mod and drug displays. Demonstrations, sampling, couponing. 
Wvindow displays. Food merchandising bar. Calls on jobbers, 
lers, retailers. 



To 



isley, i'r 



ssident; Irvin AJbeloff, Vice President. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: 

epresehtatives in \ York, Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia; Adam Young in Boston, 
|!cago. St. Louis, San Francisco, Los Angeles. Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati. Cleveland. Pittsburgh 
"larke Itrown Company in the South and Southwest. 



Richmond and 
Central Virginia 



WXEX-TV ^ 



3 -STATION 

MARKET 

MYSTERY 



I v's oldest headache 
allocations snatches 
the spotlighl 
deadline approaches 

Page 33 



Is pre-testing 
tv copy more 
hope than fact? 

Page 36 

Radio rates high 
with blue-ribbon 
advertiser panel 

Page 40 

New dal 
weh- 

Page 45 



WSIXTV 

Tops Them All In 
The Nashville Area 

LEADING IN . . . 

6 out of TOP 
*10 

out of T0P~ 

SHOWS 



t WSlXsELLS WITH TOWER HEIGHT 

2049 ft. above sea level . . . none taller 
permitted in this area by CAA. 

r WSlXsELLS WITH POWER 

316,000 powerful watts . . . 
maximum — permitted by FCC. 

WSlX SELLS WITH EFFICIENCY 

Maximum coverage and low cost per 
thousand make WSIX-TV your most 
efficient buy in the rich Middle Tennessee, 
Southern Kentucky, Northern Alabama 
TVA area. 



(X) 



CHECK THESE 

FACTS: 



(X) TV Homes — 370,700 
(X) Population — 1,965,500 
(X) Effective Buying Income 

$2,155,868,000 
(X) Retail Sales — 

$1,585,308,000 






© Vol. 14. No. 15 • 9 APRIL I960 

SRONSOF 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS Us 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The 3-station market mystery 

33 Scandal investigations notwithstanding, FCC's 1> 
own admission — allocations. Here's the latest 



1 problem is by 
tv's oldest prohl! 



Tv copy testing: fact or hope? 

36 Agencies, clients and researchers are striving for valid formulas 
predict the success of a television commercial by pre-testing "rougl 

Firth's local level tv partnership 

39 Carpet company discovers way to tie national tv advertising to lo 
level. Decorating show hoists Kalamazoo sales 119%, Baltimore, -1 

Radio gets boost from sales VIP's 

40 RAB Clinic hears top execs from Mennen, Red Heart, Taystee, 
Northwest Airlines, Cities Service praise radio in modern marlo tj 

Spot radio helps build a city 

42 Centex, national builder, calls upon spot radio to play major promot 
role in opening of new mammoth project in Boca Raton, Flor 

An industry in action — Part II 

44 Continuing the record begun last week of what important industry grot 
have done since October to tighten tv advertising standards, conti 

New audience data on tv web shows 

45 Revised ARB format gives more detailed viewer composition via a 14 v 
breakdown of male, female age groups. Included here: April Tv 




FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

56 Film-Scope 

30 49th & Madison 

62 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

8 Newsmaker of the Week 

62 Picture Wrap-Up 

26 Reps at Work 

76 Seller's Viewpoint 



52 Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

78 Sponsor Speaks 

61 Spot Buys 

78 Ten-Second Spots 

74- Tv and Radio Newsmake 

55 Washington Week 



in^l 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation J 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: M.M 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birminjhj 
Office- Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 5 ji^ 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore ■ 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries W 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Add* 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published w«| 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1960 Sponsor Publications I 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1 ' 



PEOPLE 
work - play - LIVE 

by RADIO! 




WHO Radio Holds a Big Lead in Total Radio Audience 
in America's 14th Largest Radio Market, Sign-On to Sign-Off! 



T} ADIO'S a family affair in the vast 93- 
-*-^- county area called "Iowa PLUS!" Yes 
Sir, here in "Iowa PLUS" — as in few other mar- 
kets in the country — thousands of high-income 
families WORK. PLAY, LIVE by RADIO! 

These families recognize and demand mature 
radio. They know WHO Radio fills the bill. 
WHO Radio is, and has been for 36 years, 
aggressive, alert, alive! WHO is radio at its 
sparkling best; offering the finest in enter- 
tainment, news, sports, and special features. 

The 93-county area Pulse Report (Feb.- 
March, 1959) gives WHO Radio from 18% 
to 35% of the total radio listening audience 
— first place in every quarter hour surveyed 



— the balance being divided among 88 other 
stations! 

See that your announcements reach "Iowa 
PLUS" — the "cream" of Iowa's tremendous 
radio audience! Your PGW Colonel has the 
details on Iowa's only big-audience station! 

WHO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Oes Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

NBC Affiliate 

WHO Radio is part of Central Broadcasting Company. I 

which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Des Moines; V/OC-TV, Davenport 

Col. B. J. Palmer. President 
P. A. Loyet. Resident Manager 
> Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

K-^s» Peters. Griffin, Woodward, Inc., RcfresentJihes 



9 APRIL 1960 



Fact... 

the big 

daytime trend 
is to NBC. 

A verage rating 

up 22%.. . from 7.6 to 9.3 



In February 
NBC Television 
reprogrammed 
its afternoon 

lineup. Here Average share of audience 

are the dramatic up 10%.. .from 33.5 to 37.0 second network. 
results, Average homes per minute 87% greater 

according to up 24% . . . from 3,193,000 share than the 

Nielsen. * to 3, 956, 000 third network. 



Fad.. 

NBC's afternoon 

Fact. . . audience increased 29 

NBC's morning £ f/me hd 

leadership continues. from Queen For A Day 

21% greater share at 2 pm to Adventure l 

of audience than the at 4:30.. . up in 



share of audience. 

The Loretta Young 
Theatre. . . up 63% over 
the former program. 



look what's happenin 



'act... 

BC wins half 
oil top-rated 
If hours. 

1C... 6 half hours 
t#2...6 half hours 
.#3...0 half hours 

iry NBC program 
>pt one reaches more 
?s per average minute 
any program on 
tird network.) 



Fact... 

Six of NBC's seven 
audience participation 

programs out-pull competing 

programming on both 

of the other networks. 



NBC Average. . . 4,100,000 
Homes Per Minute 

Net.#2 Average. . . 3,700,000 
Homes Per Minute 

Net.#3 Average. . . 2,500,000 
Homes Per Minute 



Fact... 

NBC leads in 
overall average 
program share. 

NBC. ..37.0 
Net#2...36.7 
Net.#3...23.2 



NBC 

TELEVISION 

NETWORK 



t broad daylight I 




NTI Average Audience. 10 am-1 pm 
and 2-5 pm Mon.-Fri.. including 
NBC sustaining ratings. 
Feb. I and Mar. I, 1960. 






WHEN 




WALB-TV 

CH. 10 — ALBANY, GA. 

is the only primary 

NBC outlet between 

Atlanta and the Gulf . . . 

in a J740 million market! 

Represented nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 
In the South by James S. Ayers Co. 






NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Clair M. McCollough, chairman of a three-man policy coir, 
mittee to direct JSAB until a new president is named, thi 
week delivered the keynote speech at the NAB Conventior 
urging stations to regulate themselves in cleaning up busines ( 
practices regarding vague and changeable station rate card\ 



The newsmaker: Clair M. McCollough was the center 
attention at the NAB Convention's first day of meeting. He h 
been named to receive the 1960 NAB distinguished achievemei 
award. Following the death of Harold E. Fellows last month 
until a new NAB president is named, he was the spokesman of til 
NAB for the trade and the public. 

Mr. McCollough's keynote speech made three main points. Firs|| 
stations must regulate themselves 
to clean up certain business prac- 
tices; second, they must endeavor 
to build a better appearance be- 
fore the public, and third, they 
should be more willing to see the 
accomplishment of the NAB itself. 

It was only the first of these 
points that the NAB policy com- 
mittee chairman developed in any 
detail. He asked whether stations 
were selling or bartering. If they 
were really selling, he cautioned 
against continued rate manipula- 
tion, trade deals and rate cutting — or the absence of any rates at al 

He also warned NAB members not to underestimate the organ 
zation. "You could pay your dues for the rest of your life and 
owe money on the obligation," he said. 

Trade observers at the NAB meeting were aware of the tentativ 
nature of Mr. McCollough's position as policy chairman. His a< 
dress could not, of course, commit the NAB to new policies until 
new president is named. 

Mr. McCollough's broadcasting career commenced in 1929 i 
WGAL, Lancaster, and he has been identified with Pennsylvania Btj 
tions ever since. He founded the Pennsylvania Broadcasters Ass( 
ciation in 1932, and has served the NAB repeatedly for 20 years o 
committe assignments and as convention chairman. 

In 1955 he was a key figure in planning and launching TvB. Hi 
is also chairman of TIC which organized TIO last year. 

Native of Pennsylvania, Mr. McCollough has contributed eff< 
on behalf of civil defense, the Red Cross and The National Conf 
ence of Christians and Jews. He resides with his wife and dau 
in Lancaster. 




Clair M. McCollough 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19 5( 







INTRODUCING... 

The new WTCN Gopher 

Twins. They'll Bring you 

Exciting News of WTCN 

in the months ahead. 



Watch for the WTCN gopher twins . . . 
call your Katz man for availabilities 
in the Twin Cities on WTCN radio 
and television. 



TWI N CITIES 




wtcn 



TELEVISION 
AND RADIO 



ABC STATIONS FOR MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL. 
Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 



jiPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



PRIME TIME 

FEATURES 

TOPPLE 

NETWORK 

GIANTS! 




- 



"MOVIE OF THE WEEK" 

(7:00 P.M. Wednesdays) 

took 68°° of the audience 

with a March 9th Trendex 

rating of 41.1 against 

highly-touted "Wagon 

Train" (24% share and a 

rating of only 14.1). 

Against "The Price is 

Right", "Movie of the 

Week" zoomed to 

a 45.1 Trendex. 

Here's perfect proof that 

alert promotion combined 

with potent programming 

pays off in the rich 

Southern New England 

market. Get your share! 

Call Blair or Gene Wilkin 

at PL 1-9776. 



WPRO-TV Providence 



SPONSOR 



VP-Assistant Publisher 
Bemaro F 4- 

EOITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMiHin 
New* Editor 

3en Bodec 



Senior Editors 

Jane Pinker+on 
W. F. Miksch 



Film Editon 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editor* 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben SefT 
Lloyd Kaplan 



Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 



E; - 



'.'*-• 



He'ene E+el»on 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sale* Manager 

Arthur E. Braider 
Eastern Office 
Bernard Piatt 
Willard Dougherty 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachurn 
Western Manager 



Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg Mansqer 
Bill Ce-'e e - 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Otec 

- 
: .. ._. Tomade 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19 



'HE POWER OF PEOPLE, not machines, or technology, or formula, but VVIL THE BALABAN ^TATICiN^ 

iterested, thinking, warm-hearted and loyal people are selling your products ^t. Louis 

_____ in tempo with the times 

_»Lnd services every day at the Balaban Stations. Nothing sells people like people _, ,7^'^ John F. Box, Jr., 

*% ,_._,.„_ DaUaS Managing Director 

,nd at Balaban, we ve got people . . . the right kind . . . the right amount to sell _*_•■-_■-— 

WRIT SOLD NATIONALLY BY 

3T you. Meet just a sampling of our key personnel. Milwaukee ROBERT E. EASTMAN 

HE MOST EXPERIENCED FLAGSHIP STATIONS IN THE NATION 



MEZafM PrterD^tt St.Uuu Bob Osborne £*" 

9 SL"-' "- ™ H 

JTm^St nothing sells people like 

^ ^kT. - ^ Aart.loGen Mgr.RRIT Pp—mmioj. KBO 



EwlBunum ^8t N^KBOX 

L-Rothm*, jn 

_^^^ K»- Cn, 

^ ft 

CUrke Webber 






SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



N 



\ 



Attention 
advertisers! 



/ advertisers! \ 

Piel's Beer is sponsoring * 

INTERPOL CALLING, \ 

starring Charles Korvin as 

Inspector Paul Duval 

on New York's WPIX, 

Sunday nights at 10:30. 

Now Interpol's story, 

which the puhlic has been 

reading about in 
Reader's Digest and other 

magazines and j 

newspapers, comes to * 
television . . . 




Sounds 

great, Bert. Just 

like you and me, 

/ INTERPOL CALLING \ 

(and Piel's make a 
sure-fire selling • 

I combination. And if I may ' 
make one small pun, j 
\ both Duval and Piel's I 
\ always keep their ' 

heads ... in any / 
situation. / 

v y 



\ 



'INTERPOL CALLING' 

the new television series that 
Bert, Harry, Blitz-Weinhard, 
Pfeiffer's, Labatts, Miller High Life, 
Santa Fe Winery and so many 
other kinds of advertisers are 
buying, buying, buying! 



INDEPENDENT 

) TELEVISION 

CORPORATION 



488 Madison Ave. • N. Y. 22 • Plaza 5-2100 

ITC OF CANADA, LTD. 

100 University Ave. • Toronto 1, Ont. • EMpire 2-1166 




by John E. McMillu 

Commercial 
commentary 

Shakespeare's first stand 

Here in New York we are hicks and rubes 
about an awful lot of things and one of them is 
the matter of editorializing by radio and tv 
stations. 

That, I am sure, is partly the reason why the 
maiden editorial on WCBS-TV two weeks ago, 
an eight-minute speech by station manager 
Frank J. Shakespeare, Jr., against proposed off- 
track betting legislation, stirred up comment along Madison Avenii 
and in our press. 

Most of us in the business know that dozens of stations around th| 
country have been editorializing for years. I myself have a des 
drawer crammed with choice examples of radio and tv editorials. 

But somehow it took the WCBS-TV effort — a network flagship t 
station taking sides on a hot local issue — to wake up us New Yorker 

Not that the Shakespeare screed was wholly a rip-roaring succes 
Personally, watching him at home, I thought the CBS mouthpiec* 
seemed a little self-conscious and solemn, and his editorial somewhi 
thin, uninspired and not fully convincing. 

Five nights later Robert W. Dowling, chairman of the Citiz 
Committee for Legalized Off-Track Betting, took advantage of tr 
station's offer of free rebuttal time and blasted what he calle 
"Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors." 

Since then Eve had a chance to study both scripts and I must sa 
that Dowling's seems both far more factual and far more persuasiv 
even though I myself lean toward the CBS positio 

But of course it was not the merit, or lack of it, in a single e<l 
torial which makes the WCBS-TV project exciting. What stimulate 
most of us was the sudden realization of the almost incredible poss 
bilities, problems and implications of the editorial approach. 

How CBS set up its ground rules 

If you are a station manager who tapes and broadcasts editori; 
as a regular part of your weekly stint (See sponsor, 5 March, 
34), you are of course familar with the need for rigid editoril 
ground rules. 

But few of the rest of us, I suspect, have ever had to think throu i 
what is involved in this unique station activity. 

That is why I was fascinated to see recently a CBS inter-offid 
memo, dated 7 January, 1960, which set down "Rules and Guidj 
posts for Editorials on CBS-owned stations." 

The memo, a directive from the CBS Editorial Board, states firm] 
that editorials on CBS owned stations "should be broadcast with cc i 
siderable regularity and frequency" and that "there need be no u J 
formity of editorial views among the various CBS stations." 

It then details a number of editorial rules, some of which are 1 
most unique for the industry. For instance, CBS owned stations- 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 195 




WAVE-TV Gives You 
28.8% MORE HEADACHES! 

{headaches your products can soothe, that is!) 



In any average week, at least 28.8% more 
people watch WAVE-TV than any other TV sta- 
tion in Kentucky, from sign-on to sign-off. And ALL 
these extra families of course have their share of head- 
aches, sweet teeth, yens for new automobiles, etc.! 
WAVE-TV gives you much lower costs per 1,000 
than any other TV station in Kentucky. 

These are FACTS. Ask us (or NBC Spot Sales) 
for the proof. 




CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 

NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, National Representatives 



KCBliOP 




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* G.PHOLLINGBERV HAS DETAILS 



Commercial commentary (continued) 



1) May not editorialize on industry subjects or national subject: 
which have no special local issues. 

2) May take a stand on local issues, but may not support specific 
candidates. 

3) May not have editorials delivered by on-the-air news person 
alities or announcers who are primarily connected with commercial' 
or entertainment programing. 

4) Should present editorials of sufficient length to "present th 
logic and evidence behind their conclusions." Editorial spots are' 
taboo, and, says the board, "only rarely should an editorial be les 
than five minutes long." 

Most significant of all, the CBS program board, though notin 
that "the concept of 'equal time' does not apply to editorials," direct 
that CBS-owned stations must "make every effort to search out opp< 
sition to their partisan editorials" and provide opportunities for on-j 
the-air replies. 

New horizons and new editorial headaches 

f think that almost anyone reading these rules and the rest of thej 
thoughtful CBS memo ( prepared for the editorial board by director, 
of special projects, Richard D. Heffner l will immediately spot soma 
of its revolutionary implications. 

In the first place, it goes far beyond the free press, free speechj 
principles on which our newspapers and magazines are operated 

It sets up for radio and tv rules of fair play which print medial 
have never felt obligated to follow. (Can you imagine the Hear- 
press offering free space for rebuttals on its editorial page?) 

It provides a new concept of public interest operation ("Thd" 
primary purpose of presenting CBS station editorials ... is to sen 
the public interest by stimulating thinking and decision-making 
about important public issues.") 

And finally, by imposing on managers of CBS-owned stations a 
duty to have and express opinions on local issues, it considerably 
broadens the functions of broadcast station management. 

A feu weeks ago, columnist Walter Lippmann sneered that "a t 
station is not like a newspaper — it is like a printing plant." Th 
CBS directive (and similar directives by \\ estinghouse and others- 
would spell the doom of the printing plant notion. 

All in all, editorializing seems to open up endlessly exciting vista 
on the radio/tv horizon. 

But now let me, as an editor, throw in some words of cautic 

Watching the Shakespeare effort. I was forcibly struck with tl 
fact that there is a great deal of difference between the desire to ed 
torialize and the ability to prepare a tv editorial. 

As a matter of fact there are no traditions, no great models f< 
tv editorials, such as we have in newspapers and magazines. 

CBS insists that its editorials be fair, accurate and "effective 
But the truth is — there are probably not 10 people in the count 
with the new. specialized talents to guarantee such effectiveness. 

I think that on-the-air editorializing is great — as an idea. I agr< 
with Heffner who says that station editorials must not be gimmick: 
or promotion stunts. 

I'm sure that there are dozens of sincere broadcasters who lo< 
on editorializing as an important kind of public service. 

But what I want to know, kids, is — where are your editors? # 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19(>< 



o 



G 






Congruent Triangles of Eastern Iowa 
or Geometry Made Difficult 

There's a triangle in Eastern Iowa formed by 
three of Iowa's six largest metropolitan areas — 
Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, and Dubuque. 

There's a television station in Eastern Iowa 
formed by programs it carries and rejects, faces 
turned to its public by personalities, sap drawn 
from roots it has growing in communities it 
serves. Its artistic and commercial success is a 
result of congruence of style with area. 

In evidence we offer some immodest pragma- 
tism: 

No matter what survey you subscribe to, 

WMT-TY leads in all time periods from 9 a.m. 
until sign-off in share of audience, Sunday thru 
Saturday. In station totals. WMT-TY enjoys 

substantial dominance from 6 a.m. until sign-off. 
Sunday thru Saturday. 

O (if we max say so) ED. 



WMT-TV . Mail A 



s: Cedar Rapids • CBS T 



. National Representatives: The Katz Agency .Affiliated with KWMT. Fort Dodge: WMT Radio 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



To the people of the Twin Cities and the vast Northwest WCCO Television has become a habr 
... a routine . . .a way of life. They have taken Channel 4 into their homes likea member ci 
the family for they know they can depend on Channel 4 to give them the type of day-in and day 
out programming that suits them and their needs. 

It is a habit with housewives to always include Randy Merriman andArle Haeberle in theij 
daily lives. 

Kids storm their television sets each afternoon to watch Axel, Bozo and Clancy the Cop, 

People of the Northwest have learned to depend upon the Dave Moore News and the Dean 
Montgomery News on Channel 4 because they know it is the complete news, unaltered by sen 
sationalism and bias. Channel 4 News is also the only place in Northwest television where the 
viewers find a thought-provoking editorial upon which they can pause and reflect. They know 
only Channel 4 gives them thenews in depth the type of newscasting that fits their way of life 

Channel 4 is a sports fan's haven. Northwest people not only get all the scores and sport 
features on the Dick Enroth, Rollie Johnson and Don Dahl sports programs, but here is where 



® 



AFFILIATED WITH THEC M J CBS -TELEVISION NETWORK 



; : U ;ey find live telecastsof all types of sporting events m „, h. 

the area. The whole family knows that throuX^' a 'ffl^ " u°" ^ ° ther television ■*■*» 

is assured of the finest in television fere " "^ ^ CBS Television Network 

These are but a few of the reasons whv Wrrn t*i q • ■ • m 
I Great in Twin City Television. ffiSSiSXS " t^T™^™" G °° d 
onth-after-month by Nielsen. In fact iust takW tL ! ' ' ' A f&CtS whlch are P rove * 
ielsen shows WCCO Television ™™ ^ g P&St year rMarch '59-February '60, 

00 AM to Midnigh?tTn "^ " a *\ 4 ^ share of the total audience fron! 
se ay other four station Y & , ' ' * a record virtually unmatched in 

It all goes to prove IffliJ f/ 

e Northwest. Call I ?, C ° Tele Y ision is a Way of Life in 

>arn how you, too, [ Peters > Griffin, Woodward, Inc. and 

sell your prod- ||, can depend on WCCO Television 

id Northwest H ggjjffl th e Minneapolis-St. Paul 

raai'ket. 



^ :hc 





COMMUNITY 

LEADERS 
SINCE 1922 



Day in, day out . . . year after year, the Triangle 
Stations have compiled a record of continuous 
service to the community unmatched by any 
other broadcaster in America. 

▲ "Studio Schoolhouse"— America's old- 
est program of in-school instruction by 
a commercial station . . . continuously 
broadcast on WFIL, Philadelphia, since 
1943 and on WFIL-TV since 1948. 

a "University of the Air"— America's 
oldest and largest continuously run 
adult education program in commer- 
cial television . . . now in its 10th year 
on the Triangle Stations. 

During 1959, Triangle Stations contributed 
$4,931,000* in time for public service announce- 
ments and programs, and more than $361,000 
out-of-pocket expenditures for public service. 

*One-time national rate 

Operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pr..j 
WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton, N. Y. / WLYH-TV, Lebanon-Lancaster, Pa.j 
WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona-Johnstown, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, Harrford-New Haven, Conn. / KFRE-AM • TV • KRFM, Fresno, C<l.l 
Triangle National Sales Office, 4-8 5 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 
Regional Offices: 3440 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5 / 6404 Sharon Rd., Baltimore 1 2 




Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



v SPONSOR -SCOPE 



9 APRIL I960 As the fall selling season on the tv networks moves into high gear, this phe- 

c«yriiht i960 nomenon is quite manifest: an emotion-charged resentment among important agen- 

8P0M80R cies against CBS TV for its allegedly arbitrary attitude toward advertiser and pro- 

publications inc. gram acceptance. 

The core of the gripe : CBS TV has interpreted the Justice Department's "grant" of pro- 
gram responsibility as freedom (1) to force the network's own programs on its steady cus- 
tomers and (2) to oust long-term advertisers because of their products. 

The net results of this sort of dictation, contend these agencies, can be these: 

• Program costs will be much higher than obtainable in the open market. 

• Creative latitude for the medium will be more constricted than ever, since the in- 
dependent producers will have no course but to direct their talents elsewhere. 

• Advertisers will insist that, if the network is to assume all this responsibility, there be 
escape-hatches from floundering network-controlled programs, say, after the first 
three or four telecasts. 

But with all this the agencies wryly concede : We're in a sellers' market and, until the net- 
work proves wrong as a judge of program quality, there isn't much we can do. 

(See "Tv program control — where is it headed?", page 35, 2 April SPONSOR.) 

CBS TV's behavior has spawned the credo among some of its older clients that un- 
less the weight of a General Foods can be swung, a time franchise no longer means 
anything on that network. 

Included in the dispossessed — at the moment — are American Tobacco, which was in 
two CBS shows last season, and Pharmaceuticals, which had two shows of its own. 

When Pharmaceuticals, deprived of its Thursday 9-9:30 p.m. niche after spend- 
ing $30 million with the network over seven years, offered to buy into a CBS-owned 
show for the fall, it got a response that was anything but encouraging. 

El Producto (Compton) is buying minutes and chainbreaks adjacent to tv 
sports at the rate of three a week for six-seven weeks, beginning 1 May. 

Other spot tv campaigns that broke the past week: Helena Rubenstein's Colorlift 
(OBM), 17 weeks at the rate of three-five a week; Scott Paper (JWT), Dual Filters 
(Gumbinner) ; Arm & Hammer Sal Soda (Brooks, S, F&D). 

Cunningham & Walsh asked for availabilities around shows with appeal to 
primary and high school children for an unnamed account. 

Two tv afficionados — Minute Maid (Bates) and Maxwell House (B&B) — are 
back in spot radio. 

Maxwell's limiting itself pretty much to the smaller market, but with Minute Maid it's a 
widespread deluge, using 50 to 100 spots a week (ROS). The orange drink's starting 
date: 9 May. 

Spot can look to Ford for considerably larger expenditures next season. 

Network-wise the company will confine itself to more of Wagon Train, the Alfred Hitch- 
cock series, Ernie Jones and several Leonard Bernstein specials. Roughly, that adds up to 
about $20 million. This is still $4-5 million less than went for network time and 
programing during 1959-60 season. 

The plan is to pour this difference, and more, into fast moving and big spot flights 
on the part of both the factory and the Ford dealers. 



• 9 APRIL 1960 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



ABC TV stole the razzle-dazzle side of the NAB convention in Chicago this wee 

The network accomplished — via its meeting with affiliates Sunday — its objective in spadi 
(1) impress them with the new season's program schedule and (2) whoop 'em up to renew 
enthusiasm in clearing for and promoting ABC's wares. 

Among the highlights of this rally : 

• Henry J. and Edgar F. Kaiser showed up, along with Y&R president George 
Gribbin, to assure the affiliates they've got a winner in Kaiser's newcomer series, Ho 
Kong. Remarked the elder Kaiser: he was against the idea of keeping the sponsor out 
the program, because the sponsor was important to the teamwork of making his show a succe 

• Leonard Goldenson revealed that Ollie Treyz in one day had racked up $89 m 
lion in billings and Goldenson predicted that ABC by 1970 would gross $1 billi« 
a year. 

• Treyz, himself, credited a huge part of the network's success to its system of selling pj 
ticipations in nighttime programs. To illustrate what this concept can lead to, he said tH 
The Untouchables this fall will be converted from a total spot carrier to an excj 
sive property of Liggett & Myers on alternate weeks. (L&M has a similar arrangem« 
on ABC's new hour show, The Islanders.) 

• Ralston Purina's Jeffrey Baker said his company had become so favorably c 
posed to documentaries that it would sponsor another, Expedition, this fall on AH 

NBC TV also held a session with its affiliates and the news that scored most excitemej 
it had weaned away all of General Mills' daytime business from CBS TV. 

For more on Convention notes, see WRAP-UP, page 64, and NEWSMAKER OF TJ 
WEEK, page 8. 

Clair R. McCollough, chairman of the NAB policy committee, made a comment 

his keynote speech to the convention that many broadcasters deemed quite timely. 

Observed McCollough: the basic dangers of the industry are "rate manipulations, tr 
deals, downgrading the competition in our own media and kindred activities." 

Bosco's participation in Corn Product's alternate sponsorship of Dennis 
Menace won't affect the beverage's expenditures for spot tv. 

It'll still be in that medium at the rate of $2 million a year. 

Why Bosco (Donahue & Coe) has a strong affinity for spot: the personalities alii 
with the local kid shows make the product's sales results their personal concern t 

hence treat the sell as a continuing responsibility. 

Spot radio has another hefty year-round customer that's asking stations foi 
longer end rate, namely, L&M cigarettes out of DFS. 

The question put to reps the past week: ask your station (pre-selected in each case) h 
much higher they can go above the 260-time frequency, because we're figuring 
around 10 spots a week for 52 weeks. 

L&M's estimated prospective radio markets : between 300-400. 

The switch this week of the Edison Electric Institute account (headed for 
million) from F&S&R to Compton poses an interesting development in the relations! 
between public utility accounts and their agencies. 

In time past the utilities looked to their public relations firm's connections to look out 
their legislative and regulatory commission pressures. 

Today this concern has become part and parcel of administrating the utility's geni 
advertising. 

This twin-headed responsibility for influencing — Washington as well as the consumer! 
puts the agency knee-deep into politics and it's courting trouble if it doesn't get the 
reading. 



20 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 13 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Another first for CBS TV : this fall it will have three advertisers co-sponsoring 
a half -hour program. 

It's the repeats of Father Knows Best. Already committed : Scott Paper, which con- 
trols the reruns by virtue of a contract with Screen Gems. 

Scott is also, with Lever, on Bringing Up Buddy, likewise CBS, for the fall. 

R. J. Reynolds will spend about the same money for net tv as it did last season 
($25-26 million) but it will have three new shows. 

Holdovers: I've Got a Secret, Wagon Train, Lawman and 77 Sunset Strip. 
New: The Flintstones (ABC TV) and two to be selected. 

ABC TV's newest assault on a piece of NBC TV daytime business involves 
Brillo. 

The account's billings with NBC amounts to about §1 million a year. 
Highlight of ABC's come-with-us pitch: We'll give you more commercial minutes 
for the money, even if there's no advantage in total audience delivered. 

One of ABC TV's latest statistical flourishes: it's got about as many stations 
with top audience ranking in the top 25 retail markets as the other webs combined. 

The rank is based on the average ratings for an entire week from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. 
and, with the latest ARB local and latest NSI as the source, the comparison simmers down to 
this: 







ARB 






NSI 




NETWORK 


1st 


2nd 


3rd 


1st 


2nd 


3rd 


ABC TV 


13 


4 


8 


12 


10 


3 


CBS TV 


11 


8 


6 


12 


9 


4 


NBC TV 


1 


13 


11 


1 


6 


18 



With all the strides that ABC TV has been making, CBS is still running a mil- 
lion homes ahead of it per average minute of nighttime viewing. 

The first March national Nielsen posts these averages: ABC, 9,249,000 homes ; CBS TV, 
10,277,000 homes; NBC TV, 8,730,000 homes. 

A price for the Summer Olympics has been settled on by CBS TV: §740,000 
per quarter. 

The package involves broadcasts over 18 days, much of it at night and 34 minutes of 
commercials. A likely repeat sponsor, Renault (Kudner). 

The relationship of increased average viewing to increased billings has been 
on somewhat of a seesaw in network daytime tv the past two years. 
Note these ratios as derived from LNA-BAR and Nielsen data : 

YEAR DAYTIME BILLINGS PLUS MARGIN AVG. DAY VIEWING HRS. PLUS MARGIN 

1957 $157,000,000 _ 90,640,000 

1958 172,500,000 9% 99,325,000 10% 

1959 203,100,000 18% 110,508,000 11% 
Incidentally, 50% of all tv homes watched the medium before 6 p.m. each week- 
day on the average in 1959. 

Just to bring you up to date on the amount of time spent before the tv set in 
the average home. 

According to Nielsen, it was exactly the same this February as it was for February 1959: 
5 hours and 52 minutes. This is 7 minutes under the January average. 



• 9 APRIL 1960 



21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The tv network spot carriers mushroom — there'll be at least 24 hours of then. 

at night this fall — while the ratio of full sponsorship of hour and half-hour program keep? 

drifting the other way. 

Mark this comparison of the number of shows fully sponsored by a single advertiser as 

of each first February Nielsen for the past three seasons. 

segment 1958 1959 1960 

Full hour 15 9 13 

Half-hour 52 53 37 

The appearance of the product's package — principally because of the relation of tv to the 
supermarket shelf — has become so important that package improvement, say agency mar-* 
keters, has begun to compete with the advertising budget. 

In discussing the situation these marketing men inject this wry note: too much con- 
centration on the package can lead to neglect in other directions — like the product it- 
self and the product message. 

Sports in network tv have taken on an added premium value for next season 

— witness the competition now going on for events among the networks — for these reasons 

1) The audiences racked up by the Winter Olympics dramatically demonstrated! 
the strides made by sports as a viewing attraction. 

2) Sports have a big edge over entertainment specials in cost-per-1,000, cominj 
in on the average of $2 CPMPCM as compared to an average of $8 for specials. 

3) Both CBS TV and NBC TV will be carrying far less entertainment specials. 
Here's a network-by-network breakdown of estimated sports revenue (time, rights, produc- 
tion and cable costs included) for the coming season: 



NBC TV 

EVENT PACKAGE PRICE 



ABC TV (Cont'd) 

EVENT PACKAGE PRICE 



Major League Baseball 


$7,600,000 


Game of the Week 


$2,750,000 


Pro Basketball 


7,000,000 


Post Fights 


1,500,000 


Pro Football (Bait., Pitts.) 4,500,000 


All-Star Galf 


1,450,000 


World Series 


3,600,000 


All-Star Football 


375,000 


All-Star Games (2) 


1,200,000 


Bing Crosby Golf 


250,000 


Rose Bowl 


700,000 


Miscellaneous 


3,000,000 


Sugar Bowl 


700,000 


TOTAL ABC TV 


$21,925,000 


Hialeah-Monm'th Races (10) 500,000 


CBS TV 




National Champ Football 


400,000 


NFL Games 


$7,500,000 


National Tennis Singles 


350,000 


Bsbll. Game of the Week 


6,000,000 


Liberty Bowl 


300,000 


Sunday Sports Spectacular 1,500,000 


Blue-Gray Game 


250,000 


Masters Tournament 


450,000 


National Open Golf 


250,000 


Triple Racing Crown 


425,000 


NIT Games (2) 


250,000 


Orange Bowl 


400,000 


Pro Bowl 


250,000 


Cotton Bowl 


350,000 


Senior Bowl 


250,000 


Blue Bonnet Bowl 


250,000 


East-West Game 


200,000 


Gator Bowl 


250,000 


Pre-Game Sports Shows 


200,000 


PGA Tournament 


250,000 


Miscellaneous 


1,500,000 


Copper Bowl 


200,000 


TOTAL NBC TV 


$30,000,000 


Holiday Bowl 


200,000 


ABC TV 




Miscellaneous 


1,500,000 


Sat. Night Fights 


$7,040,000 


TOTAL CBS TV 


$19,275,000 


NCAA Football 


5,560,000 


GRAND TOTAL $71,200,000 

tsue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 







Spot Buys, page 61; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 62; Washington Week, page 55: sponso 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 74; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19601 



i 




WWJ makes it easy for Bengal fans to enjoy every daytime game 
during the 1960 season. Located near the middle of the dial 

at 9-5-0, and with power that blankets Detroit and southeastern 
Michigan, WWJ garners a tremendous audience for the baseball 
games and adjacent programming. 

Another facet of WWJ's Total Radio concept— another 

reason to call your PGW Colonel today. 




TOTAL RADIO FOR THE TOTAL MAN 



1AI1AI I AM and FM 

VV W«J RADIO 

Detroit's Basic Radio Station 
NBC Affiliate 

iTIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. . OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE DETROIT NEWS 

i'NSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 23 



• 



L-J 








lliil 




\, 





ftsSifcf 




What makes it tick? 



The business of television is as complex as the 
electronics that make it possible. As complex, in 
fact, as the public's expectations of television. 

Since early January, KMOX-TV has been broad- 
casting a weekly experimental program called 
"Inside KMOX-TV." Its purpose is to foster real 
rapport between station and audience, leading 
to fuller understanding by the public of station 
policies, programming and problems— and fuller 
continuing understanding by the station of what 
the public wants and expects from television. The 
audience is invited to submit questions by mail 
(constructive criticism is welcomed!), and those 
questions which reflect widespread interest are 
answered on camera by station executives . . . 
frankly and forthrightly. (Sample questions: Why 
1^^^^ do the commercials appear to sound louder 
iH ^k than the surrounding programs? Why do 
JP J ^ft you no longer carry hockey? Why do you 
H t I H carry girdle advertising?) 



Giving viewers a look inside, so that they 
will know "what makes it tick," is an at- 
tempt to stimulate broad public interest, 
and a sense of participation, in the affairs of the 
medium. Such participation can be of incalculable 
value in shaping television's role for the future. 



Channel 4, St. Louis jSJVl®yv~l V 



Spots 
That 
Bring 

Sales 



KCRA is programmed to deliver 
a receptive, upper-income audi- 
ence. The news department has 
12 qualified, full-time newsmen 
. . . the sports department covers 
everything from sports car races 
to the Sacramento Solons base- 
ball games, with NBC to add the 
national events . . . music is 
chosen for melody, and present- 
ed by six long-established per- 
sonalities . . . sound program- 
ming, plus the services of a full- 
time merchandising department 
that produces real results. What's 
more, KCRA limits spots to three 
minutes per quarter hour, in- 
cluding promos and public serv- 
ice announcements, so your sales 
message has a full opportunity 
to do a job. Call your Petry man 
for instant availabilities. 




Reps at work 




Thomas A. Taylor, Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., Chicago, thin 
that, "like the weather, everyone complains about radio ratings, t 
no one does anything about them. I don't believe anyone in the 
dustry would stand up and say that ratings alone can tell either 
buyer or seller the best buy for an advertiser. The secret of sucq 
then lies in measuring and inter- 
preting the other characteristics of 
a station — type of programing, 
type of audience, station image, 
exact coverage, ability to influence 
its audience — and matching them 
to the advertiser's product and 
objective. Sure, it's challenging 
— to advertiser, agency, station 
and rep alike. But radio has be- 
come big because it can sell prod- 
ucts and ideas everywhere, any 
time, economically. 'Idea men' in 
the coming years will be rewarded handsomely for new concept: 
programing, new ways to measure, new ways to use the mediu 
We're entering an era of unlimited opportunity for everyone c 
cerned with radio. And we at PGW accept the tremendous challei 
Radio will fulfill its promise if it is used and measured creativi 

Robert W. Jensen, Forjoe & Co., Atlanta, feels that only by sti 
adherence to the personal attention and service call aspects of th 
work, can representatives do a complete job. "Not many reps 
concerned with helping an advertiser or agency once a schedule 
begun," Bob says. "They allow a schedule to continue to run 
the same manner without maki 
anv new suggestions when 
times and programs become av 
able. Service calls are few i 
far between, and when a sales?: 
does make a call, often it's for 
other purpose than good v 
Rather than thinking of a 13-v 
contract as only that, I look at 
as a potential continuing sched 
for as long as the station has 
ability to sell the advertiser's p 
uct or service, and I do everythi 
possible to better his schedule after it's started." Bob thinks ano-1 
area for rep improvement would be better market analysis. "Sil 
no two markets behave exactly alike, any contribution a rep ma] 
from factual sources helps an agency and advertiser tremendous'y 
and in the long run, the rep. Personal attention today is essent 




9 APRIL 19 




£>> 



Horatius made things happen in Rome 



and 




WPEN 

RADIO 
MAKES 
THINGS 
HAPPEN 
IN 
L PHILADELPHIA 

WPEN is the first station in Philadelphia to 
"review" the daily newspapers. This excit- 
ing concept was originated by the Consol- 
idated Sun Ray Stations. WPEN, again, is 
first in Philadelphia with this challenging 
feature broadcast four times daily. We were 
the first station to editorialize — we are the 
first with "Newspaper Critic". In Public 
Interest . . In Exciting Listening . , In Sales . . 
WPEN Makes Things Happen In PhU^rlalphla. 

WPEN 

Represented nationally by GILL-PERNA 

New York. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 

CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS 
WPEN, Philadelphia . . . WSAI, Cincinnati . . . WALT, Tampa 




_____ 



The 

Churchill 

Memoirs 

FIRST OF A SIGNIFICANT SERIES 

OF ABC TELEVISION 

PROGRAMS IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST 

"It is my earnest hope that pondering 
upon the past may give guidance in 
days to come, enable a new generation to 
repair some of the errors of former 
years and thus govern, in accordance 
with the needs and glory of man, 
the awful unfolding scene of the future." 
With these words, Winston Churchill 
concludes the preface to his memoirs. 
And from these words the most 
ambitious project in visual history 
takes inspiration: ABC's television 
presentation of this pageant of 
the fateful years from 1919 to 1949. 
To meet so immense a challenge, 
historical film footage— much of it 
never shown before— has been 
gathered from allied and axis sources. 
Cameramen have girdled the globe 
to film special interviews with the 
history-makers of our time. For this 
series, President Eisenhower, former 
President Truman . . . many German, 
Italian, Japanese and Russian 
leaders have added their eye-witness 
testimony to the record. 
But dominating the stage, giving 
the vast scene immediacy, color, 
dynamic import . . . are the words, 
the voice, the presence of the great- 
est of all living history-makers . . . 
The Right Honorable Winston 
Spencer Churchill himself. 
The program, with special musical 
score by Richard Rodgers, will be 
brought to the American television 
public next fall in a series of 26 
half-hour episodes. 
Pridefully, it takes its place in the 
array of public affairs grams 
creating the significant look of ABC 
Television in 1960. Q 

WATCH ABC-TV IN '60 

(more people will) 



from a proud past 



comes a. 



FUTURE 
UNLIMITED! 




Everywhere you look in Montgomery 
you see progress. This new 
$1,500,000 airport with the longest 
paved runway in the Southeast 
is only one example of this area's 
vast growth. Expansion means 
opportunity ... an opportunity to 
expand your sales in a million 
market. And WSFA-TV covers the 
area like no one else can. 

NBC / ABC MONTGOMERY - CHANNEL 12 



49th a 

Madisc 



fe 



Represented by Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Ini 



New, exciting- 

musie 

iiso 




Woman's world 

Just finished reading your verv cle\ 
"Timebuyer X and Those '73 You 
Men" i 12 March l. In relation 
your answer. "Sponsor Says No 1 
Clarice" — if you have received a mi 
mum of 273 cancellations for si 
scriptions. Cherchez les femmes! 
Mrs. Z & Y 
Greenwich. Coi 

From Fmdom 

On behalf of all FMdom, the cone 

network and WHCX-FM. in parti. 

lar. thank vou for all those wonderfj 

words under your 5 March "Sponsj 

Speaks." 

Quite a few FMers won't be 1 
FMeral ' kindly excuse! next tin 
they approach a potential sponsor i 
the subject of FM advertising. Yol 
message was right on target! 
Are reprints available? 

Amleto Ciccarelli 

sales mgr. 

WHCN-concert netinv 

Hartford, Conn. 

• Note: SPONSOR is usually happy to £ 

1. Requests must be in writine. 

2. Credit must be gi»en to SPONSOR. 
SPONSOR reprints many of its articles 

has back files on a large number of them. 

Open season 

Thanks for a very fine "Commf| 
cial Commentary" i sponsor. 
March i regarding the recent Ml 
Luce article in McCaWs. 

1960 seems to be open seasoi 
radio/tv. 

I think there is little use to tal 
arms against this sea of critics, ho] 
ever. I believe that the industl 
should correct those errors that hi] 



WNJR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



set- 



;en made and attempt to improve 
it product. Most of us have always 
:en doing just that. (Unfortunate- 
, Mrs. Luce belongs to that frater- 
tv-sororitv of national publications 
|at are building circulation on con- 
;mnation of radio and television — 
id greater distribution of maga- 
les of sex and suggestion.) 
I hope that we can all work to- 
ard one end in the broadcasting 
isiness — fine entertainment, aggres- 
ve news and public service, and 
lalitv programing. 

Joel Fleming 
v. p.-mgr. 
W'TKO 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



wo sides of the coin 

he bitter with the sweet. 
W e were most impressed to see our 
ice president in charge of radio for 
le Detroit office of PGW. Bill Brvan. 
Credited in your "Who's Who in Mo- 
Dr City Radio/Tv?" (sponsor, 19 
larch ) . 

i Bill's a great guy. However, for 
■ record, the article noted that he 
as been with Petry since 1944. Dear 
ir. he has been with PGW. 

As always, the issue of sponsor 
/as up to your usual high standards. 

Robert H. Teter 

v. p., radio 

Peters. Griffin. Woodward. Inc. 

\. Y .C. 

lullseye! 

'aul Miller's article ("The Seller's 
/iewpoint."' 12 March) hits right at 
he heart of a situation peculiar to 
nany markets, including Erie. 

It is to be hoped his thought-pro- 
roking comments will reach the eyes 
)f clients and agencies that are guiltv 
)f overlooking point-of-sale areas in 
heir campaigns. 

Of equal importance is the frustra- 
ion of a manufacturers representa- 
ive or distributor in a point-of-sale 
irea who gets no credit for the suc- 
cess of an ad campaign because all 
-ales are credited to his more fortu- 
nate colleagues located in a distribu- 
tion center. 

I wish I had said it first! 

Paul Whittingham 

marketing mgr. 

WICU 

Erie, Pa. 



Of course, there's another Personality Station 




Hieronijmus Bosch 14507-1516? The Ship of Fools — Dutch School 

. . . but it just doesn't compare with 

K-NUZ. -the NO. 1* BUY in HOUSTON 

... at the lowest cost per thousand! 

MUSIC! NEWS! PERSONALITIES! FACILITIES! 



*See Latest Surveys for Houston 




SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



C TV- land 



LAND OF 



AND YEAR-ROUND SPENDING, TOO! & 



The 52 county Tallahassee, Florida — 
Thomasville, Georgia area, served exclu- 
sively in its entirety by WCTV, is far en- 
ough South to afford its happy citizens 
year-round good living yet far enough 
North to permit it to escape the feast-or- 
famine business climate sometimes result- 
ing from tourism. 



This means high-level year-round spend- 
ing - - - Tallahassee actually stands fifth 
in the U. S. in retail sales per household*. 
That's why so many leading brands place 
strong, long-term spot schedules on 
WCTV. Get the full story from Blair Tele- 
vision Associates. 
'Annual Survey of Buying Power, 7 959. 




WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



C25 



<§> 



THOMASVILLE 



a John H. Phipps 

Broadcasting Station 

AIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 



+ S PONSOR 

9 APRIL 1960 



fapids 



Providence 
Syracuse 
Rochester 



Wheeling-Steubenville i 



AS FCC DEADLINE 

on allocation proposals nears 
ABC TV is preparing claims 

that 4,000,000 +v homes in these 

dozen markets are deprived 
of three-net service 



Louisville 



Raleigh-Durham 
Krwxville 



Charlotte 



Birmingham 



THE 



Jacksonville \ 



V STATION 
MARKET MYSTERY 



* 



Quiz scandals and payola notwithstanding, No. 1 
>roblem, says new FCC commissioner, is tv allocations 

How public can be best served within present frame- 
work perplexes nets, advertisers, engineers and FCC 



Wh 



hen Frederick W. Ford stepped 
n as new FCC chairman the other 
veek, he named as the No. 1 head- 
iche facing the Commission: televi- 
sion allocations. 

To the average person who has 
ollowed the quiz show revelations, 
layola investigations and the Com- 



mission's own brush with scandal, 
allocations must have seemed an odd 
choice for post position. But the 
fact is, whatever the complicated al- 
locations problem lacks in sensation- 
al news copy, it more than makes up 
for in significance both to the ad- 
vertising industry and the viewing 



public. It is tv's oldest and most 
nagging migraine, and now it's back 
in the spotlight again. 

For some idea of what share of 
the spotlight it's now grabbing, here 
is what has been happening and 
what's about to happen: 

• 19 April is the day the FCC has 
set for receiving filings of allocation 
proposals on the question from in- 
terested parties, and the interested 
parties, including the networks, are 
currently at work on these. An un- 
disclosed party has just requested an 
extension on the 19 April deadline, 
but. at sponsor presstime, the FCC 
had not yet acted on the request. 



9 APRIL I960 



33 



1 



HERE'S THE POSITION AMST TAKES 

ASSOCIATION oj Maximum Service Telecasters favors any 
"sensible" approach to problem — 50 long as the viewing public 
doesn't lose. Interference in radio is bad: in tv it's intolerable 



2 



IS THE ALLOCATIONS problem as critical as some make 
it?. According to .Xielsen and TvB, 91% of U.S. tv homes have 
choice of three channels: average tv home receives five signals 



3 



CITES RECENT CASE of adding third station to a market 
and adversely affecting 19 other tv stations. To advertiser. 
means reduced circulation that might make tv less attractive 



• At the NAB Convention in Chi- 
cago, the allocations enigma received 
considerable attention, was a princi- 
pal topic under discussion at a meet- 
ing of The Association of Maximum 
Service Telecasters. 

• ABC TV, in a continuing six- 
year fight for more tv stations in 
major two-station markets, is prepar- 
ing a new plan for filing that will 
accomplish this without, according 
to the network, upsetting or interfer- 
ing with any current tv service. 

• Commissioner Ford is trying to 



negotiate with the militarv for some 
of their vhf channels, but is not too 
optimistic on the outcome. If the 
military doesn't come through, his 
Commission faces finding some other 
solution because, according to Ford, 
there is irresistible pressure for more 
tv service. 

The current allocations problem 
emerged about six years ago, when 
it became apparent uhf was no match 
for vhf. The problem must be solved 
taking into account demands that any 
new vhf drop-ins dare not adversely 



1 



ABC TV VIEWS PROBLEM THIS WAY 

NET IS FILING new proposal which it claims would not ad- 
versely affect any existing stations and would give people in 
all areas full choice of all net programing now- being aired 



2 



MORE THAN 4,000,000 tv homes in a dozen major markets 
still arc not getting three-net service, that a number of markets 
with third station approved for years don't have station yet 



3 



SWITCHING CHANNELS, and in some cases reducing mile- 
age are bases of plan. As it is now, ABC TV claims, some ad- 
vertisers suffer losses, public misses many service programs 



affect existing stations, and that then 
be no channel changes for existii.j 
stations. Further tangling this bri 
patch is the fact that while everyom 
in the industry is anxious to brin; 
about more tv service, their propose* 
methods are often conflicting. 

The problem in a capsule is thk 
^ hy. with tv homes nearing 
saturation point, are there still : 
jor markets in the U.S. where viewer] 
cannot see all of the net shows tha 
are being telecast? Why do sod* 
markets have three or more station: 
while some with many more tv horrid 
have only one or two stations? 

It is a mystery that would ad 
worry a New Yorker or Angeleu 
where seven tv stations can be 
ceived. but it might bewilder a U 
owner in the Raleigh-Durham ar« 
where nearly a quarter million fami 
lies are able to receive only t' 
channels. 

To the national advertiser, 
causes concern as well. If he happen! 
to be sponsoring a net show that 
squeezed out of some major markets 
his commercials aren't getting ex 
posure there. 

But there is another facet to the 
mystery. If the addition of a thin 
station to one of these two-statior 
markets interferes with the receptic 1 
of the adjacent outlets, then the na 
tional advertisers on all the station* 
have cause for alarm — as do the set 
owning families. 

Behind this thorny problem an 
these facts: At present there are 12 
vhf channels and 70 uhf. But uhf re 
ceivers are relatively few compare( 
to vhf. and production of uhf seti 
has been declining for five vears. 
the uhf channels (14 to 83 1 are usee 
much less than vhf. But the military 
now has claim to many vhf channel* 
outside the tv band: if FCC cou ( 
persuade it to make some of thei 
available to commercial tv. then th 
problem would be well on the wa 
solution. 

Since this doesn't appear likelv 
the FCC sees itself faced with abo il 
three alternatives < and these are tl:«j 
same that have been booted about fd 
vears 1 : 1 1 1 switching to all uh' J 
(2) dropping in new vhf statio 
with the risk of interference: f 
continuing the present mixture 



u ■ 
• l 

I 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19( 0>i 



dl 



; f and uhf but adopting a device to 
^courage use of uhf. 
On the latter measure, Sen. John 
store (D), R. I., has introduced a 
1 1 giving FCC authority to take the 
:p. The step would be: require tv 
: manufacturers to make all-chan- 
1 sets that can receive vhf and uhf. 
is estimated this would add $15 
, $25 to the cost of a set (less as it 
comes mass-produced). Since the 
/erage set lasts about seven years, 
' the end of that time, all sets would 
: "omni-spectra." It still is a seven- 
:ar solution to a problem nearly 
'ice that old. 

Meanwhile, ABC TV, which has 
gently outgrown its "third network" 
,g but is still without outlets for 
»tme of its high-rated programs in 
vo-station markets, is urging that a 

flited number of short-space tv sta- 
ns be assigned to major two-sta- 
'on population centers of the U. S. 
ihis network points out that more 
lan four million tv homes are being 
eprived of full choice of three-net 
;rvice in these major markets: 
rand Rapids-Kalamazoo, Louisville, 
yracuse, Rochester, Birmingham. 
Ijfaleigh-Durham, Charlotte, Provi- 
Tence. Jacksonville, Wheeling-Steu- 
fjenville. An average of 65% of ABC 
I V's programs, the net claims, are 
riot carried in these markets. A 
further — and stronger claim when 
I he common weal is considered — is 
I hat viewers in these areas during the 
I nonth of December were not able to 
Tee 60%of public service and special 
lielecasts presented by all three net- 

vorks. 
j , Another question in the "Three- 
Station Market Mystery" is raised by 
J,j\BC TV: Whv have third channels 
Ijtiot gone on the air in markets to 
which FCC allocated new vhf stations 
(| back in 1957? The markets named: 
jMiami, Terre-Haute, Davenport-Rock 
Island-Moline. Louisville, Lake 
Charles-Lafayette. Tampa-St. Peters- 
jberg and Beaumont-Port Arthur. 

"You can't pour three quarts of 
jmilk into two quart bottles," Julius 
iBarnathan, ABC TV vice president, 
jtold sponsor. "The basic need for a 
(quick solution to the allocations 
(problem is to serve the public better. 
"Our country is synonymous with 
(Competition and freedom of choice. 



And anyone who has invested in a 
tv set certainly is entitled to choose 
from all programs offered the show 
he wants to see. 

"As for advertisers who can't get 
enough exposure in two-channel mar- 
kets — well, their circulation goes 
down and their costs go up. The ABC 
TV plan encompasses many facets. 
In some markets, de-intermixture 
would help, for example. But the 
point is that the whole plan we're 
going to propose to FCC has been 
carefully worked out by engineers. 
It will protect all existing stations 
from interference. It would utilize 
the 12 channels that now exist. 



interference with existing outlets, 
and the cutting off of service to rural 
and fringe areas that occur with mile- 
age shortening. Actually, we're not 
concerned with how many pick up sta- 
tions compete in a market — just so 
the public has good service. But once 
you open the door to experiments and 
make exceptions in one market or 
another, there is the danger of de- 
stroying the whole tv set-up." 

What is the present tv set-up? 
AMST reports this on the basis of 
A. C. Nielsen Co. and Television 
Bureau of Advertising surveys: 

• 98% of the U. S. land area re- 
ceives television. Better than 86% of 



1 



THREE POSSIBLE CHOICES FACE FCC 

MOST EFFICIENT solution would be if FCC could beg, bor- 
row or steal from the military additional channels. This would 
permit adding new stations without interference to present ones 



2 



SWITCH TO all uhf { but uhf use and set production have been 
declining), or just dropping in vhf's. Degrading, as in latter 
case demands tricky engineering or interference would result 



3 



CONTINUE present mixture of u and v, but insist set manu- 
facturers make all-channel sets (cost per unit, $15 to $25 
more ) . So it might be licked in seven years, average life of set 



"The basic solution," Barnathan 
went on, "is switching channels. In 
some cases the answer would lie in 
reducing mileage." 

As deeply concerned with the same 
problem, but opposed to most past 
ABC TV proposals, is the Association 
of Maximum Service Telecasters, 
Washington, D. C, representing some 
150 member tv stations across the 
country. 

"We're in favor of any reasonable 
and sensible approach to the alloca- 
tions problem," AMST executive di- 
rector Lester W. Lindow told SPON- 
SOR, "so long as the people don't lose. 
But we do get very much concerned 
where proposals are made that create 



all homes have television service. 

• 94% of tv homes in U. S. have 
a choice of three stations. 

• 81% of U. S. tv homes have 
choice of four stations. 

• The average U. S. tv home has 
a selection of five signals. 

On the basis of such findings, 
AMST is not at all sure the situation 
is quite as critical as it is painted by 
some interested parties. But thev, too, 
would like to see all-service coverage 
everywhere. 

"This will take." Lindow contin- 
ued, "a solid plan carefully worked 
out by engineers" ("AMST engineers 
have been engaged in this for years). 
(Please turn to page 73) 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 




PRE-TESTING I 
rough film or anil 



USUALLY DONE AT TWO LEVELS: with 
ited storyboard is completed. Milton Guttenplai 



igency people at stage; 

v.p.. Mogul, Williams & Sayl. 



I production and with consumers after 
demonstrates jeep set-up for production test 



Tv copy testing: fact or hope? 



^ Most agencies and advertisers involved in heavy tv 
investments strive to predict results in copy testing 

^ Many interesting new techniques are evolving, but ad- 
pros say a successful formula is more hope than fact 



W 



ith many millions of dollars 
earmarked for television — and even 
more in the offing — one of the in- 
dustry's most pressing problems to- 
day is how to get the most from a tv 
commercial sales message. 

Every ad agency in the country 
and every tv advertiser, agree that the 
best possible way to maximize the 
dollar investment in tv is to pre-test 
commercials. But they don't agree 
on how this can be done. 



The many methods developed to 
date have provided partial answers. 
But partial isn't enough, as one ad- 
man commented, when — for example 
— a $1 million tv campaign can rise 
or fall on the strength of the com- 
mercial. Admen don't expect total 
answers or, in the words of Milton 
Sherman, manager of the commu- 
nications research department at 
MARPLAN, an affiliate of McCann- 
Erickson, "an all-purpose answer." 



But they have to approach a more 
complete answer than they think is 
now available. 

Pre-testing of television commer- 
cials has evolved into two general 
practices: viewers' evaluation of 
rough commercial and of a finished 
one. The limitation to testing a rough 
film or an animated storyboard — the 
most prevalent forms — is evident in 
the word "rough" itself. A "finished" 
commercial blends all of the audio 
and visual elements for a total psy- 
chological effect on the viewer, taking 
nto consideration all of the market- 
ng and sales strategy. A "rough" or 
'semi-finished" commercial omits 
many subtleties which may make a 
desired viewer impression. 

Yet an advertiser who tests a com- 
pleted or finished commercial, runs 
the risk of having his total investment 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



.t, either by scrapping the film or 
je or by airing a sales message 
lich in the pre-testing indicated a 
•k of the desired consumer response. 
Somewhere between these two ex- 
:mes — a $300 rough commercial 
d a S10.000 finished one — lies an 
;ea which most agencies and re- 
archers are trying to explore, 
ley're looking for one thing: A 
oduction technique which permits a 
st commercial to include the de- 
ed components of a finished com- 
ercial without the same high cost. 
Sherman says evolution of such a 
chnique would benefit the adver- 
ser, the creative writer and the re- 
:archer. Its advantages for the client : 
nore opportunity to try out his 
rategv or to evaluate the potential 
feet of his message"; the writer: 
more opportunity to take his crea- 
vity to the intended public at vari- 
us stages of development"; the re- 
:archer: "more opportunity to con- 
ibute information during the forma- 
te stages of advertising." 
His organization is developing an 
;perimental plan "directed at the 
Kpecific problem of determining at 
B*hat stage of 'finish' a commercial 
I an be adequately pre-tested." Some 
I if the questions which he thinks 
I night be answered in such an anahti- 
I al study appear on page 38. 
I' Most agencies, of course, are 
1 'quipped to pre-test all kinds of copy 
I n some fashion. Some conduct all 
Luch testing within their own shops 
I und with their own people. Others 
I "arm out the entire project to an 
t ■■ ndependent research organization. 
[ Mill another group plans and directs 
lie project with a staff executive but 
| fetains outside firms to do the actual 

Held work or testing. 
|j Most pre-testing is done with a 
I I'captive" audience of respondents or 
panelists, usually in what is an at- 
tempt at duplicating a viewing situa- 
| ition. Some copy tests, however, are 
[.made on the air — for example, a 
|split run of a tv commercial cut into a 
| |network show in different test cities. 
| SSCB's effort in attempting to pre- 
dict the outcome of a video commer- 
icial is typical of the imagination and 
'effort that are being put into testing 
[throughout the advertising industry. 
The agency recently opened at its 
(New York headquarters a $150,000 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



FIRST STEP: rough commercial 

"BEFORE" TEST SITUATION shows moving storybook rough prepared 
by SSCB for Nytol (Block Drug) in agency studio for test-showing to viewers 




SECOND STEP: consumer testing 

ACTUAL TESTING is done with viewers, as with this Schwerin Research 
group, or with panels, interviews. Goal: to duplicate viewing situation 




THIRD STEP: finished commercial 

"AFTER" SEQUENCE for the Nytol rough shown above appears in the 
finished commercial, revised on the basis of consumer interviews done in field 




QUESTIONS ABOUT TV "ROUGHS" 

Milton Sherman, communications research manager at MARPLAN, an affiliate of 
McCann Enckson. outlines the following questions regarding "rough" commercials, 
which he feels should be answered by an acceptable pretesting technique. 



1- Which form of commercial "finish" (rough filmed 
commercials or animatic film strip with synchronized 
sound) will most closely predict the performance of a 
fully produced commercial? And which form is the most 
suitable for various product or corporate commercials? 

2. What content factors create response and reaction dif- 
ferences between various forms of "finish?"" For example: 

A- Which demonstration techniques and devices can be used 
in various pretest forms of "finish"; which cannot? 
B - Can a personality be projected through various forms of 
commercial "finish?" Can a rough filmed or animatic pre- 
sentation create consumer identification for the characters in 
the commercial situation? 

C. Can the various forms of commercial "finish" approxi- 
mate the fantasy or setting for the product story? Can they 
convey the quality of impression for the product? Can the 
situation be perceived as a total and integrated experience? 

3. Can these factors, and others that may be discovered, 
be compensated for, or can we assess the contribution which 
they make to a fully produced commercial, and thereby 
provide certain guide lines for pre-test forms of "finish"? 

4 m Can the meanings and associations of visual elements 
be communicated in various forms of commercial "finish"? 
Which symbolic elements (demonstrations of appliance 
performance, particular product innovations and features) 
receive full meaning and understanding, and which do not? 

5. Can the richness of semantic variation be communi- 
cated in pre-test forms of commercial "finish"? Is there 
a short-circuiting of the visual and audio inter-action? 



€. Can forms of "finish" be adapted to particular prod- 
uct or corporate objectives? Can these pre-test forms be 
used as reliable experimental and exploratory technique? 



studio and "laboratory" in 
commercials for its tv clients (bil 
some $36 million a year in te 
sion) are pre-tested. 

Tim Healy, v.p. and directoi 
research for the agency, superv 
the "pre-measured selling po\ 
technique of testing. The new 
commercials, called Sound-A-Ma 
are shot in the studio in rough f 
from the standard storyboard 
are then taken to a consumer p 
for reaction analysis. 

This device also enables the ag 
to pre-test components of the 
mercial before the final "rough" 
tested. Most shops attempt at vari 
times during the development 
commercial idea to test some of 
creative approaches — visual com] 
ents, how the visual and audio t 
chronize or complement each ot 
props and settings, etc. 

Mogul. Williams & Savior, for 
ample, maintains a miniature 
studio set-up which it takes on 1< 
tion for test shots. Milton Gut 
plan, agency v.p. and account sur 
visor, pre-tests creative content < 
then turns over the final versio 
his agency's research subsidiary ( 
search Analysts, Inc.) for consur 
testing. 

Testing the creative aspects 
commercial serves several purpoa 
Guttenplan explains. "First of all. 
taking the camera and a monitor 
the client's factory or showroom ) 
can see for himself some of the d 
culties in setting up and producin 
commercial. It also, of course, 
great advantages in saving time 
well as money — time spent in ela 
rate testing and money spent in < 
side research, studio rental, ca 
salaries and production personn< 

He took his two-man crew, for 
ample, to the candy factory of Ba 
cini to set up some sample comni 
cials which involved 200 pounds 
candv. On-the-scene framing of sh 
saved transport of the product, s 
ond-hand explanations to the cli 
and rehearsal time in the studio. Si 
Guttenplan: "We work this out 
such a fine detail that seldom do 
need more than 15 minutes of cam< 
rehearsal before we put our fii 
commercial on tape or film." 

The talking storyboard — Sour 
(Please turn to page 72) 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19 



PRE-TAPING huddle presided over by W. B. Doner producer-director Bob Bleyer (r), who maps out tv decorating show plans with Firth 
consultant-m.c. Guy Cornell (c) and Doner a.e. Fred Tobey. Firth/Doner crew taped 10 halt-hour shows in hectic four-and-one-half-day period 

Firth's local level tv partnership 



Carpet company gives retailers, who tie to half-hour 
decorating show, a lot of leeway in selling on video 



After test, markets respond with sales hikes up to 
119%, program moves into nine-market spring campaign 



multi-market, modest budget tv 
vehicle that lends itself to close local- 
level tie-in. That's been the elusive 
goal of many a carpet manufacturer. 
Some have tried and failed, others 
haven't felt it was worth bothering, 
land the group has more or less re- 
signed itself to a steady diet of print. 
Firth Carpet and its agency W. B. 
|Doner hit on such a tv plan about a 
year ago, tested it in two divergent 
types of markets — with extremely fa- 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



vorable results — and are now putting 
it to work in nine markets, with more 
to come. It's a half-hour 'how to" 
home decorating show, known as 
Spotlighting } ou. which had its trial 
runs in Baltimore and Kalamazoo on 
a live basis. After the spring. 1959. 
cycle over WMAR-TV, Baltimore, 
area sales were up 49% over the pre- 
vious spring. Also the series produced 
4,000 written requests for the free 
decorating book offered on the show. 



To make doubly sure of the new 
format's effectiveness. Firth added 
Kalamazoo, a "less sophisticated" 
market to the fall. 1959. trials. When 
the figures were in after an eight- 
week run on WKZO-TV there, Firth's 
sales showed a whomping 119' r 
jump over the fall of 58. Meanwhile. 
back in Baltimore which underwent 
its second cycle in fall, 59. this time 
over YVBAL-TY, Firth sales were up 
20% over the same period a year 
earlier. And another 3,000 requests 
for booklets streamed in. 

That was enough for Firth and 
Doner; it was time to 1 ch out. 
Here are the stations fil 
spring lineup at press 
TV, ^Baltimore: KLZ-TV. Denver: 
KRNT-TV, Des Moines: WWL 
Indianapolis: WKZO-TV. Kalama- 



zoo; WPST-TV, Miami: KFSD-TV, 
San Diego; KING-TV, Seattle and 
WRC-TV, Washington. 

Though the shows are created by a 
national advertiser for exposure in 
several markets, their destim i- 
shaped to an unprecedented extent at 
the local level. In each new market 
the fir*! step i- to sell distributor and 
dealers on the show. They are invited 
to see sample films and discuss them 
with men from Firth and Doner. 
Once the distributor decides he's 
willing to split time and merchandis- 
ing cost? with Firth, it's up to him to 
line up dealers. Each show is devoted 
to one of them, who not only chooses 
the Firth line to be featured on the 
first 90 seconds of the three-minute 
live commercial, but receives the re- 
maining 90 seconds for institutional 
advertising. ("With 30 to 40 Firth 
lines, each in 10 colors from which 
to choose, and about 90 retailers 
doing the choosing, we write commer- 
cials by the millions," exclaims Doner 
a.e. Fred Tobey.) 

Continues Tobey, "In keeping with 
the local level emphasis, we assign the 
Firth commercials to women's pro- 
gram personalities from the stations 
we use. Those gals usually have a 
large loyal following which we are 
glad to reach, and they are most help- 
ful with mentions and occasional in- 
terviews on their own shows." 

The participating retailer is urged 
to help put the show over with print 
ads, placement of Firth's special show 
promotion cards in his window and 
out on the floor and prominent dis- 
play of the carpets featured. 

Even station selection is determined 
largely at the distributor-dealer level. 
"They know local conditions, so we 
usually go along with their prefer- 
ence if the availabilities are right for 
us," Tobey explains. 

Spotlighting You is usually sched- 
uled in the 1-4 p.m. period on the 
rationale that by 1 p.m. most women 
have completed their housework and 
for the next three hours, more or less, 
their school-age children will be out 
of the house. Highest priority goes to 
1:30-3 p.m.. considered most likely 
to find the ladies at leisure. 

However, for adjacency to effec- 
tive women's programing, Firth is 
willing to go into other time slots. In 
Miami and Washington, for instance, 
{Please turn to page 72) 



RADIO 
FROM 



BOOST 
VIP'S 



^ Mennen, Red Heart, Taystee, Northwest and Citie: 
Service executives plug radio's place in marketing 

^ "No sentiment about it," says Bain, "we're 80^ 
in radio because it upped our sales 24% in year 



Highpoint of the fifth annual 
National Radio Advertising Clinic, 
which the RAB staged last week on 
successive days at the Waldorf-Astoria 
in New York and the Sheraton-Black- 
stone in Chicago, were five unusually 
frank and meaty talks on radio's place 
in modern marketing campaigns. 

According to agency media and 
account men who attended the day- 
long sessions, there was more solid 
genuine sales enthusiasm generated 
for radio at this year's RAB get- 
together than at any industry meeting 
in recent history. And credit for a 
rising belief in what Raymond C. 
Keck of Cities Service Co. labelled 
the "tremendous resurgence in radio" 
belonged in large part to the five 
client spokesmen who talked on "The 
Radio Campaign." 

Leading off on the blue-ribbon ad- 
vertiser panel was Robert Llevellvn. 
advertising manager, American Bak- 
eries Co. of Chicago which last year 
invested $500,000 in a spot radio 
campaign with a minimum of 60 
spots per week in 33 U. S. markets. 

Prime marketing consideration in 
Taystee's use of radio was the medi- 
um's ability to target housewives with 
frequency. "The average housewife 
buys bread three times a week," 
Llewellyn noted, "and any medium we 
used had to reach Mrs. Housewife 
often." 

A second important consideration 
in the Taystee media plan was the 
abilit) of American Bakeries' agenc\ . 
Y&R, to come up with top flight com- 
mercials. Six variations of Taystee's 
"Breakfast in Bed" theme were re- 
corded with the best musical talent 
available I Taystee spent $27,000 plus 



»' 



residuals for the six recordings) 

The commercials themselves pr< 
vided Taystee with a valuable marta 
ing bonus. Albums containing 
six songs were distributed to grocel 
and interested listeners, and in 
Louis alone the bakery distribute 
more than 1,000 copies. 

Ray Keck, advertising manager < 
Cities Service, also stressed the i 
keting considerations which had di! 
tated his company's continuing shii 
to radio. I $1 million in spot radic 
1959, and radio increases due th/ 
year.) 

"*\\ e have found in the oil bu4 
ness," said Keck, "an increasing ne( 
to reach motorists at strategic bu; 
times. That's why 70% of our budg 
now goes into radio and outdoor.' 

Cities Service concentrates its sp 
buys in four drive periods per yet 
and goes after drive time perio 
(6:30-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m.) on We 
nesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, wi 
eight-second reminders in weekei 
schedules. 

F. J. Torrence, advertising direct 
of John Morrell & Co.. makers of R 
Heart Dog foods, emphasized that ti 
fiercely competitive nature of the | 
food industry put a premium 
smart, economy-minded media 1 

"We have 3,000 competitors," sal 
Torrence. "The average grocery stof 
stocks at least 15 brands of dog fooc| 
and I've counted over 50 brands a 
sizes in some big supers." 

"This means we've got to reach c 
prime target, housewives, efficient ■ 
economically and with great continil 
ty. A heavy radio campaign is 
best answer — and we believe in i 
it week in and week out." 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1 ( . ' 



: 
o 



William G. Mennen Jr., v.p. in 
large of sales at the Mennen Co.. 
ascribed the highly successful spot 
impaign which Mennen ran from 
ily to November 1959 in 75 markets. 
"Four weeks after the spots started, 
ie of our largest St. Louis drug 
holesalers reported a 50% increase 
titfc Mennen deodorant sales, with a 
)'r increase in Foam Shave and a 
'S% increase in Quixana." said Men- 
?n. Only radio was used to push 
||( ese products. 

Mennen's 1959 campaign in spot 
•dio was directed at the male market. 
Ne found it the most efficient way 
reach men — including our own 
lesmen," said Mennen. He disclosed 
yeatly expanded radio schedules in 
e coming year, for both Mennen's 
en and teen-age lines. 
Gordon M. Bain, hard-hitting sales 
p. for Northwest Orient Airlines, 
rought chuckles from the audience 
the RAB Clinic when he disclosed 
at there was "absolutely no senti- 
ent in our use of radio." Northwest 
its 80', of its ad budget in radio 
|:cause it has "brought us sales in- 
[eases of $20 million in 1958, and 
fen more in 1959. As long as it 
mtinues to produce for us. we'll 
jay with it." 

Bain emphasized that an airplane 
•ket is a "perishable commodity" 
i id that airline advertising must have 
treme flexibility to meet emergency 
^les conditions. "Our advertising 
:ency (Campbell-Mithun) boasts that 
,ey can change radio in 24 hours — 
id sometimes we make them do it.' 
,As proof of radio's result-getting 
-•wer. Bain described a new flight 
heduled by Northwest out of Chica- 
r . for Seattle at 6 a.m. Until radio 
illvertising pressure was put behind 
e flight it was operating at 20% of 
pacitv. Within a week after radio 
ots started it was running 85% 
Jll, and has remained at this figure 
lien after special radio promotion 
,|i it has been discontinued, 
it Northwest's radio commercial was 
,e of eight chosen as "most effective 
the RAB awards luncheon, and re- 
vived a gold plaque. Other winners: 
,idweiser (D'Arcy), Coca-Cola (Mc- 
unn-Erickson). Ford I J. Walter 
;iompson), Nescafe (William Esty) 
j'psi-Cola (Kenyon & Eckhardt). 
•hlitz fJWT), Winston (Esty). ^ 



ONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 




SPOT RADIO WILL HELP BUILD 






hm 







A CITY WILL RISE from this 8,000-acre tract of raw land in Boca Rato n, Fla., mapped out by Centex city p 



-; .esc: = -c:;-- '-s _s*" • 



^ City-builder, Centex, spends niore than 65^c of 
budget on spot radio to promote University Park opening 

^ Builder tops off saturation campaign with 120 spots 
on 9 stations opening day. draws crowd of 5.000 to site 



\* entex Construction Co. builds 
cities, and radio helps to populate 
them. 

Within 10 \ears. the 8.000-acre 
tract of raw land at Boca Raton. 
Florida, pictured above, will yield to 
the guiding hand of master builder 
Tom Li\elv. Centex president, a city 
of 40.i m hi. complete with schools, 
parks, churches and industry. But 
first Lively must find buvers for the 
1.0,000 homes he proposes to build 
there, and in order to do so he counts 
on a big assist from spot radio. 

Centex has built several similar 
projects across the country and has 
found a more important place for 



radio in each successive venture. 
From this experience the company 
has developed a two-phase advertis- 
ing technique. 

The objective of the first phase is 
to build a large audience for opening 
day ceremonies, for the larger the 
opening day crowd, the bigger the 
base for future sales. The objective 
of the second phase is simply to keep 
the company message in the public 
mind until all the houses have been 
purchased. The plans for promoting 
i\ersit\ Park development in 
Boca Raton called for 35' r of the 
budget to go to radio in the second 
phase of the campaign, but in the 



just completed first phase, radi 
share was better than 65 f c. The 
suit: opening dav crowds sur] 
all expectations, as nearly 5.1 
tential home-buyers swarmed 
project. 

The campaign, planned by Cei 
and its agency. Glenn Advertis 
Dallas, was calculated primarily 
reach the tourist, including many 
tired couples, with plans to settL 
Florida, who represent nearly 80 f 
the Centex market. 

In planning a campaign aime< 
the tourist in the Boca Raton ar 
savs Tom Lively, "there are uni 
circumstances that have to be ta 
into consideration. Most tou 
aren't "dial-switchers.' They'll ; 
prettv much to one station, 
what with the tremendous car re 
down here, you want to get your s 
in traffic time. But in this vacat 
land, that's from sun-up to sun-d< 
Traffic time is sun time." 

Since Centex planned to begin 



DIA CITY HERE 




ipaign just one week before open- 
lg day, the schedule called for heavy 
I* Saturation on nine stations covering 
1 ie Florida Gold Coast: 50 minute 
;i[ nnouncements each were aired on 
?GBS. WQAM and WINZ in Miami: 
le'VFTL, WWIL and WLOD, Fort 
uti Lauderdale, and on WPOM, Pompano 
i teach. WBDF, Delrav Beach, and 
vTAT. West Palm Beach. This phase 
H the campaign reached its climax 
<>" n opening day when an additional 
20 spots were played. The nine-sta- 
e lion schedule continued for another 
3 [ ijwo weeks, closing out phase one. 
' l| For this kind of a saturation sched- 
' ;| i!e the agency created three sets of 
lorflO commercials, with each set dated 
Jiy the pitch, "Go to the Grand Open- 
ing on — or "Grand opening today," 
r r' Mind finally,: "Drive out and see it 
(tow." In this manner the commercials 
jraljvere always timely, retained their 
oijjmpact. Following Lively's precepts, 
he spots ran from sun-up to sun- 
si lown and there were enough in each 



l sponsor • 9 APRIL 1960 



group to provide for variety, cancel 
risk of antagonizing the non dial- 
switching tourist. The agency also 
felt that it couldn't tell the whole 
story of University Park in one min- 
ute so that the information on one 
spot complemented rather than dupli- 
cated the information on the next. 
The spots themselves contain some 
hard-sell. "In Florida," explains 



SCALE MODEL of University Park community 
in central rotunda of sales building was seen 
by more than 5,000 visitors on opening day 




Lively, "you're literally competing 
with a dream," which reasoning re- 
sults in the radio pitch, "Here in 
University Park you'll realize your 
life's dream." 

Centex knows that radio is doing 
a job for it because so many people 
come out to the site so well informed. 
Another plus offered by radio was 
the on-site interviews conducted with 
opening-dav spectators bv stations 
WPOM, WBDF, and WWIL. These 
stations dispatched mobile units to 
cover the event as a news story, had 
the interviews edited and on the air 
within an hour of when they were 
recorded. 

University Park has now been 
launched and is in phase two of its 
development. In phase two the real- 
estate sections of newspapers get a 
larger share of the budget, but radio. 
with a third of all ad expenditures, 
will still be depended on to bring in 
residents for the 10.000 homes de- 
signed and built by Centex. ^ 



43 



Part Two of a Two-Part Series 



AN INDUSTRY IN ACTION 



S^mce 6 October. 1959, when the House Committee on Legislative Oversight opened its hearings on qt 
slion rigging, tv and advertising have been under the most severe attacks in their histories. During th 
same p \riod all branches of the business have been taking energetic steps to correct abuses and tighten 
controls — yet a recent SPONSOR poll of broadcasters, advertisers and agencies disclosed that few knoiv < 
that has been done and accomplished. To present a clear chronological record of accomplishments, spo 
sou began in its last issue the story of "An Industry in Action." Chapter One outlined the actions tab 
by the National Association of Broadcasters, Columbia Broadcasting System, National Broadcasting C 
American Broadcasting Co., and the Association of National Advertisers. Chapter Tivo deals with t 
work of the American Association of Advertising Agencies and the Advertising Federation of Ameru 



The AAAA Record 

The American Association of Ad- 
vertising Agencies, numbering 339 
agencies and including most of those 
placing important tv business, began 
action on the tv-advertising crisis 
shortly after the first of the year. 

11 January — AAAA announces 
step-up in self-regulation procedures. 
Previously the Association's machin- 
ery for dealing with objectionable 
advertising (the AAAA Interchange) 
had called for an agency whose ma- 
terial had been cited by fellow mem- 
bers to "take corrective action or not. 
as it sees fit, including calling the 
criticisms to the attention of the ad- 
vertiser concerned." 

Under the new regulations, an 
agency is given specific responsibil- 
ity for taking corrective action, and 
if it does not do so, is reported to 
the AAAA Board. The Board may 
then request the member to resign. 

19 January — AAAA issues a new 
agenc) guide, "Interpretation of the 
AAAA Copy Code With Respect to 
T\ Commercials." 

Significantly, the new guide says, 
"Since the AAAA code was written, 
the medium of tv has arrived and 
grown to great stature. And the na- 
ture of the medium has brought man) 
special problems of public responsi- 
bility for those who prepare tv com- 
mercials." 

The new AAAA "Interpretation" 
stresses that "Tv commercials are 
guests in the viewer's home," and em- 



phasizes the need for good manners, 
as well as the usual safeguards 
against false, misleading copy. 

2 February — AAAA Chairman 
Robert M. Ganger, addressing the 
ANA, says, "A Code is a necessary 
platform for voluntary self-regula- 
tion. . . . We have seen in the mo- 
tion picture field, and we are begin- 
ning to see in the case of the NAB 
Tv Code, that codes can exert an im- 
portant persuasive influence. 

"The AAAA Copy Code has been 
of great help to agency people. Per- 
haps it can become increasingly im- 
portant in other fields of advertising." 

Ganger announces that 158 offices 
of 126 AAAA agencies are now par- 
ticipating in the Association's "Inter- 
change" which gathers and reports 
complaints regarding any commercial 
that is in "bad taste, manifestly mis- 
leading, or otherwise objectionable 
to the public — objectionable even 
though it may not be in any respect 
illegal or contrary to law." 

In concluding, Ganger promises 
full AAAA cooperation with "all seg- 
ments of the advertising industry in 
any other step to advance the cause 
of voluntary self-regulation." 

The AFA Record 

The Advertising Federation of 
America, largest advertising associa- 
tion in the world, represents 50,000 
individuals in all branches of the 
business, 135 advertising clubs, 18 
national advertising associations. 



7 January — AFA counsel Mortot! 
Simon, testifying before FCC, p 
sents nine specific recommendati* 
for dealing with crisis. Recomm! 
dations include issuance of 
guide on tv advertising practices, 
tention of present legal concepts 
false, misleading advertising, avo 
ance of new legislation or censorsb 
industry machinery of self-regulati 
program of consumer education. 

5 February — AFA Mid-winter C 
ference in Washington joins 318 
men, 300 Congressmen and Fed^ 
executives for exchange of views. 

AFA president James S. Fish 
nounces plan for advertising :■ 
regulation to be administered in 
operation with Better Business 
reaus and merchant groups. 

12 February — AFA releases del! 
of self-regulation plan. "Bill of I" 
cifics" includes immediate coop< 
tion between local ad clubs and II 
in setting up ad codes and machin 
for preventing false, deceptive ad\ 
tising. Advertising which comes 
der "grey area" of poor taste, 
referred to National AFA Etl 
Committee. 

11 March — AFA issues status 
port on program, lists policing 
tions taken in Cleveland, Worces 
Dallas, Pittsburgh, other cities. 

30 March — AFA outlines to I 
clubs specific machinery for est! 
lishing "Ethics Committees" and "I 
vertising Panels" to prepare and I 
lice local advertising codes. I 



II 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL lM 



TV BASICS/APRIL 



/' 



Mew audience data on tv web shows 



* Revised ARB format gives detailed viewer composi- 
on via 14-way breakdown of male, female age groups 



rV 



ith next season's show buying 
iriod now underwa , ARB provides 
me interesting audience composi- 
^hn figures for advertisers seeding 
•tailed market data. 
This information comes from the 
ureau's December national report, 
represents a summary of the rating 



firm's new format for audience com- 
position data, which ARB began pro- 
viding in October and which contains 
a more detailed breakdown than was 
hitherto available (see chart below). 
Some of the chart's highlights: 
• The biggest group of nighttime 
network viewers, in most cases, are 



in the over 49 bracket. The older 
women like such show categories as 
variety, situation comedy, and dra- 
ma; the men, variety and western. 

• The women in the so-called 
young buying group ( 18-29) are 
more active tv viewers than the men, 
and prefer drama, mystery and vari- 
ety. Young men, on the other hand, 
prefer western and mystery. 

• Teens don't show any great vari- 
ation in viewing habits either by pro- 
gram category or by sex. ^ 



Type 


AUDIENCE COMPOSITION OF MAJOR 

No. Shows under 6 6-12 13-17 


NETWORK SHOW TYPES 

18-29 30-39 40-49 


over 49 


WESTERN 

Male 
Female 




24 


6 
7 


19 
16 


12 
10 


17 
18 


21 
21 


18 
18 


24 
22 


VARIETY 

Male 
Female 




12 


4 
5 


8 
10 


8 
10 


12 
21 


18 
23 


16 
22 


25 
32 


SITUATION 

Male 
Female 


COM. 


15 


9 
9 


20 

27 


10 
13 


11 
19 


14 
22 


13 
19 


21 
27 


ADVENTURE 

Male 
Female 


14 


8 
6 


16 
16 


12 
10 


16 
20 


21 
23 


17 
19 


22 
21 


MYSTERY 

Male 
Female 




13 


3 

4 


10 
11 


11 
11 


17 
23 


21 
23 


17 
21 


21 
21 


DRAMA 

Male 
Female 




8 


3 

4 


8 
10 


9 
9 


14 
22 


20 
25 


15 
20 


22 
27 



: AKI1, Pi-mnlH'i ln'i'i 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 

Specials scheduled during four weeks ending 6 May 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COSTS SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



T&T Bell Telephone 
rt Carney (N) 

BS Reports (C) 

rthur Godfrey (C) 



tall of Fame (N) 
ob Hope Show (N) 
ivitation to Paris (A) 
I'rances Langford Show (N) 
erry Lewis Show (N) 

lasters' Golf Tournament 



(N) 


$275,000 
225,000 




57,500 




290,000 


N) 


250,000 
320,000 
250,000 
230,000 
260,000 


t 


225,000 


n) 


225,000 



AT&T, N. W. Ayer, 4/29 
AC/UMS; Brother/Camp- 

bell-Ewald; 5/6 
Bell & Howell, McCann; 

Goodrich, BBD0; 4/21 
Greyhound, Grey; Sara 

Lee, C&W; Sears, Bur- 
nett; 5/6 
Hallmark, FC&B; 4/10 
Buick, McCann, 4/20 
Renault, Kudner, 4/27 
Rexall, BBD0, 5/1 
Timex, Doner & Peck, 

4/15 
American Express, B&B; 

Travelers Finance, Y&R; 

4/9; 4/10 
Purex, Weiss, 4/22 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COSTS SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



Our American Heritage (N) 



Jack Paar Show ( 
Playhouse 90 (C) 



Ponti, 



:Sh 01 



(N) 



Princess Margarets 

Wedding (A) 
Rexall Show (N) 
Show of the Month (C) 
The Royal Wedding (N) 



$275,000 General Mills, BBD0; 

Westclox, BBDO; 4/20 
250,000 Equitable Life Ins., FC&B, 

4/10 
275,000 Elgin, JWT, 4/26 
150,000 American Gas. L&N; All 

State, Burnett; R. J. 

Reynolds. Esty; 4/22, 

5/2 
275,000 Pontiac, MacManus. J&A, 

4/16 
90,000 Yardley, N. W 

230,000 Rexall, BBDO, 4/24 
275,000 DuPont, BBDO, 4/21 
110,000 Frigidaire, DFS, 4/24, 5/1, 



Networks: (A) ABC TV; 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 



P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 






Small World 

Olin-Mathleson 

(DArcy) 

D F $30,000 


Meet The Pres 

(Daniel A 

Charles) 
I-L $l>.50 


















Twentieth 

iK McC) 
D-F $35,000 


Saber of Londoi 

Sterling (DFS) 
My-F $28.00 

?6:30-8)# e 




D Edwards 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 

N-L $9.500+t 






No net service 








D. Edwards 

(Bates) 

Carter (DFS) 
N-L $9.500t1 




Texaco (CAW) 
N-L $ti.5U0t 


News 
N-L $6.500tt 


Broken Arrow 


Lassie 
Campbell s ""i' 

iltliDU) 
v-K $37,000 


Overland Trail 

(7-8) 

Standard Brands 

(Bates) 

P. Lorlllard 

(LAN) 

W-F $34.50( 




No net service 

D Edwards 
A titer Home 
(repeat feed) 






No net service 






Mars (Knox- 

Heeves) 

W-F $45,00 


John Daly News 


J5L 


John Daly News 


D Edwards 

alt Carter 


News 


tol 


Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 

Kaiser Co (YAH 

Drackett (TAR 

W-F $78.0* 


Dennis The 

Kellogg (Burnett) 

Best Foods 

(4/17 S) 

(GB&B) 

Sc-F $36.00(1 


Overland Trail 
P&G (BAB) 
Warner Lam. 

Feasley) 


Cheyenne 

(7:30-8:30) 

Ralston (Oard.) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

Kuril le (K&E) 

W-F $82.50C 


Kate Smith 
Show 

Am. Home 

(Bates) 

V-L $27,000 


Riverboat 

(7:30-8:30) 

Sterling (DFS) 

Noxema (SSCB 

A-F $72,00 


Bronco 

7:30-8:30) 
Brn A Wmsn 

Quaker Oats 
W-F $82,000 


No net service 


Laramie 

(7:30-8:30) 
LAM (Mc-E) 
Sunshine Biscuit. 

(CAW) 
Colgate (Bates) 
W-F $65.00< 


S 


Maverick 


Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 
Colgate (Bate*) 
all Kodak (JWT) 
V-L $85,800 


Showcase 

sponsor. 


Cheyenne 

Johnson A J 

(YAR) 

Armour (FCB) 

PAO (BAB) 


The Texan 
Brnw n A Wmsn 

All State 

W-F $37,000 
Playhouse 90 

(8-9:30) % 


Riverboat 

Sunshine Blsc. 
(CAW) 


Sugarfoot 

(7:30-8:30) 

Carnation, Gen 

Mills 
W-F $81,000 


Dennis O'Keefe 

OldBmoblle 

(BroUier) 

Sc-F $38.00( 


Milea (Wade) 

Simonize 
(5/3) (YAR) 


r 
1 : J 


Law Man 

K. J. Reynolda 

(Bsty) 

(Batea) 
W-F 841.001 


Ed Sullivan 


Showcase 
Royal Wedding 


Bourbon St. Bea 
(8:30-9:30) 
Bm A Wmsn 

(Bates) 

L-O-F (FSR) 

P&O (B&B) 

A-F $80.50 


Father Knows 
Best 

Lever (JWT) al 

Scott (JWT) 
Sc-F $39.00 


Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

(SSCAB) 

alt PAO (BAB 

W-F $47.08 


Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills (DFS) 

alt PAG 

(Compton) 

W-F $40,000 


Dobie Cillis 
PUlabury 
(Burnett) 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 

Sc-F $37.00 


Ford Startime 

(8:30-9:30) 

Ford (JWT) 

V-L $230,001 

(average 


" 

*"■» 


The Rebel 

LAM(DFS) 

alt 

PAQ (YAK) 

W-F $41.50 


C. E. Theatre 

IBBPO) 
, Or F $51.00 


The Chevy 

Show 

Dinah Shore 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

V-L $185.00 


Bourbon St. Bea 

lsodlne (R-Mc) 

Reynolds Metal 

(LAX) 

Van Heusen 
(Grey) 


Danny Thomas 

(BAB) 
Sc-F $47.50< 


Peter Cunn 
Bristol-Myers 
(DCSAS) alt 
R. J. Reynolda 

My-F $38.00 


The Rifleman 
Miles Lab 

Ralston-Purlna 

(GBAB) 

PAG (BAB) 

W-F $38,001 


Tightrope 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 

Am Tob (SSCB 
My-F $39.00 


Ford Startime 




The Alaskans 

(9:30-10:30) 
LAM, Armour 
A-F $77.50 


Hitchcock 

(YAR) 
' My F $39.00 


The Chevy 
Show 


Adv. In Paradis 

(9:30-10:30) 

LAM (Mc-E) 

A-F $80.00 


Ann Southern 
Gen Foods 
(BAB) 

Sc-F $-10,001 


Alcoa-Coodyea 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSIt) a 
Goodyear (YAK 
Dr-F $3900 
Hall of Fame 
(9:30-11) £ 


Colt .45 

Whitehall 

(Bate*) 

BrnAW (Bates) 

W-F $18,00( 


Red Skelton 
Pet Milk 
(Gardner) 

S. C. Johnson 

(FCftB) 

CV-L $52.00 


Arthur Murray 

Lorlllard (LAN 

alt 

Sterling (DFS) 
V-L $30.00 


* 

* 


The Alaskans 
7-TJp 


Benny alt 

Cobel 

Lever (JWT) 

VC-L $47.00 


Loretta Youn( 
Tonl (North) 
alt Warner Lai 
(Lam & Feasley 
Dr-F $49.50 


Adv. In Paradis 

Reynolds Metal 

(LAN) 


Hennessey 

l.nrlllard (LAN) 

Gen Foods 

(YAR) 

Sc-F $39.00 


Steve Allen 
(10-11) 
Plymouth 

CV-L $125.0(1 


Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSR) 
Dr-F $35,001 


Carry Moore 
(10-11) 
Kellogg 

PPG (BBDO) 
CV-L $109.00 


M Squad 
Am Tob (SSCB 
A-F $31.00 

Jack Paar 

(10-11) • 


H 

F 

(1 
la 
II 


Johnny Staccat 
Wa i. 

A K |U.B 


What's My Lin 
o Kellogg 
iRurnett) 

(Penln Paus) 
Q L $3200 


No net servic 


Ted Mack O 
The Original 
Amateur Hour 
Pharmaceutical! 

(Parkson) 
V-L $23. 0( 


June Allyson 
DuPont (BBDO 
Dr-F $44.00 


Steve Allen 


Keep Talking 

(Rnzell A J) 
Q-L $18.»0( 


Carry Moore 
Polaroid (DDB) 

(NLAB> 


No net service 


n 



pei tegmenl Pricea do not include sustaining, participat- 

j.riurr.-ims ( (i-ts refer to ,'iveniire show rusts including 

talent and production. Th.-y are groaa (include 15% agency commitaum) . 



(Au) Audience Participation. (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL lf0 



GRAPH 



9 APR. - 6 MAY. 



IESDAY 

NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Philip Morris 
(Burnett) 
i «■« snntt 



D Edwards 
Parliament 

(B&B) 
It Amer. Home 

-l sa.snott 



Texaco (C&W) 
*-L $6,500tt 



D Edwards 

Philip Morris 
(repeat feed) 



D Edwards 
Parliament 
It Amer. Home 

taunt landl 



News 
repeat feed) 



Wagon Train 
(7:30-8:30) 
Ford (JWT) 
000 k-F $78.00C 



To Tell The 
Truth 

Carter (Bates) 



Law of The 
Plainsman 

Amer. Too. 

(SSCB) 
P&G (B&B) 
Midas Muffler 

(Weiss) 
Sterling (DFS) 

.££ tan flfli) 



Walt Disney 

(7:30-8:30) 
Hars (Knox-R) 
Hill (Ayer) 



Greyhound 

(Grey) 

Glenbrook 

(Mc-B) 

l-F $24,000 



Dick Clark 
Show 

Beech-Nut 



Perry Mason 

(7:30-8:3*) 

Colgate (Bates) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

My-F J80.00C 



Bonanza 

(7:30-8:30) 
L&M (Me-E) 
BCA (JWT) 
Miles (Wade) 
P-F $78,000 



Wagon Train 

B. J. Reynold! 

(Eaty) 

Natl Blsc. 

(Me-E) 



Donna Reed 

Campbell 
(BBDO) 



Betty Hutton 

Gen Fooda 

(B&B) 

Sc-F $45,000 

>how of Month 



Walt Disney 
Presents 

Canada Dry 

(Mathea) 

Derby (Mc-E) 

Ward Baking 

(Grey) 



Rawhide 

Colgate (Bates) 
m (B&B) 

Nabisco (Me-E) 
Wrigley 
(EWBB) 



Trouble 

Shooters 
Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 
i-F $39 500 

Royal Wedding 
: 7:30- 8:30) a) 



John Cunther's 

High Road 
Ralston (GB&B) 
Dr-F $31,000 



The Real 

McCoys 

P&G (Comptoa) 



i ohn c n M 



(NLB) alt 

» Lorillard 

(L&N) 

V-F $36.00 



Producers' 

Bris.-Myeri 
(T&B) 

alt 

R. J. Reynolds 

<E«ty) 

$11,000 



Man From 
Blackhawk 

Miles (Wade) 



Hotel D'Paree 

Carter (SSCB) 

L&M (DFS) 
(V-F $43,000 



Leave It To 

alston (OB&B) 
Sc-F $30,000 



Kimberly-Clark 
(FC&B) 



(Eety) alt 

Chematrand 

(DDB) 



Perry Como 
(•-10) 
Kraft 

UnV-L $125,000 

Sob Hope Show 

r (9-10) « 



Pat Boone 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

MuV-L $61.00 



S. C. Jormi 
(B&B) 

General Foe 

(OEM) 
1T-T $45 



lachelor Father 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Am Tob 

(Gumblnner) 



77 Sunset Strip 

im. Chicle 

(Bates) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

My-F $85.00 



Westinghouse 

(Mc-E) 

Dr-L $80,00' 



Welk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 
Mu-L $45,000 



Untouchables 

(9:30-10:30) 
Armour (FCB) 
7-TIp (JWT) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
DuPont (BBDO) 
My-F $80,000 



Markham 

Schlitz (JWT) 

alt Renault 

(Kudner) 

Hy-F $39,000 



rnie For d Sho w 
Ford (JWT) 
V'-L $42,000 



77 Sunset Strip 

H. Ritchie 

(K&E) 

B. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 



Playhouse 
■thur Codfrey 

(9-10) £ 



Lawrence Welk 



Block Drug 

(Grey) 
L $18,000 



Have Cun. Will 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

It Lever (JWT) 

W-F $40,000 



Untouchables 

Colgate (Bates) 

Ritchie (K&E) 

Carnation 

(EWRR) 



Pharmaceuticals 
(Parkson) alt 
Lever (BBDO) 
$53,000 



Massey-Ferguson 

NL&B) 
Mu-L $20,000 



Gunsmoke 
L&M (DFS) alt 
Sperry-Rand |World Wide 60 



rVichita Town 

P&G (B&B) 
-F $38,000 



ake Cood Look 
Dutch Masters 
Jlgars (EWBB) 



Revlon Revue 
CBS Reports 



Person to Person 



Lawless Years 

Alberto Culver 
(Wade) 

$28.00C 



ibilee, U.S.A. 
Carter (4/9, 
1/23) (SSCB) 



' '■"»•. "•> film. (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Lire, (M) Misc, 
lu) Music, (My) Mystery. (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Sitnation 
' ">edy. (Sp) SporU, (V) Variety. (W) Western. tNo charge (or repeat* 



•ONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



L preceding date n 



S following date means starting 







8r 1 r ^ 

\y$ *tifo J^w * ^9l " ^^^m ^Wr 



Intimate View of the 
Population Explosion 



Two years ago the alert readers of these pages 
backed us into a corner. One of our advertisements 
featured a young mother and infant at peace with 
the world watching television. Something was miss- 
ing — mother's wedding ring! We heard about it. 

To quell the tempest it was necessary to quote 
Dr. Harry Ezell, an O.B. well-known in these parts: 
"In the period immediately following childbirth, 
many young mothers find shoes, girdles and wed- 
ding rings to be physically uncomfortable. So in 
the privacy of their own homes, they take them off." 

In closing the case we present the happily mar- 
ried mother, her ring and her two healthy examples 
of Central Ohio's own population explosion. You 
will be astonished to learn that nearly 700,000 
babies have arrived in Central Ohio since World 
War II. To keep this growing Central Ohio family 
informed and in good humor is our responsibility 
at WBNS-TV. 

Baby-tending may keep our Central Ohio girls 
housebound, but don't think they're provincial. 
Channel 10's supply of 5,000 World Affairs news 
maps was oversubscribed in short order by a deluge 
of quarters from 51 counties and 233 communities. 

WBNS-TV programming reaches the after-school 
and after-work audiences with equal success. This 
program balance requires a sure native understand- 
ing of Central Ohio where we were born and raised. 

With such a direct line available to such an 
attractive market, time buyers wrap it up in these 
ten words: "// you want to be seen in Central Ohio 
— WBNS-TV r 



WBNS-TV 

CBS Television in Columbus, Ohio 

Recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Rest Children s Pro- 
gram in the Midwest region by TV-Radio Mirror Magazine. 






DAYTIME 



C O 



P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS 



Campaign 

Roundup 

<4, 10; 4:30-5) 



Look Up & Livi 



Camera Three 



Sunday Sports 

Spectacular 

(3-4 :S0) 

Schlltz tit lust 



Coif 

Phillies tit 

Gem Razor 

Sp-F t50,00( 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Beech-Xut 



Day In Court 
Renuzlt. Best 
Foods. Sterling 



Borden, Tonl 

Sterling 



Beat The Clock 

- Maid. Coty 
Knomark. Ex-La* 



Who You Trust? 



American 

Bandstand 

Best To- h Gea 



December Bridi 



Amer Home Prot 



Search for 
Tomorrow 

p*o 



No net service 



Verdict Is Your- 



Price It Right 

SUrllnc 
tit Whitehall 



It Could Be You 

Whitehall 
Pesdi tit PJfcO 



Comedy Theatre 



Adventure Thea. 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Love That Bob 
Borden. Beech- 
Maid. Best 
Foods, Knomark 



Cale Storm 
>rackett. Sterling 
Borden. Durkee 
^STer, Gen. Mills 



Beat The Clock 



Who Do You 
Trust? 



:r. Band. 
Hollywood 
Candy. Keepsake 



Rocky & His 
Gen Mills 



I Love Lucy 
Gen. Mills alt 



December Bride 



Lot* of Life 

Gen. Willi 
tit Gold Setl 



Search For 

Tomorrow 

PJbG 



No net service 



World Turns 
PAG 

Sterling alt 



Art Linkletter 
Scott 

Kellogg 



/erdict Is Yours 

alt D. M: 



Play Your 
?ulTer. Colgate 



Concentration 
Frlgldalre 
Lm tit 

ADMrto Culver 



T mHt or 

Consequences 
Whitehall tit 

Culver alt PAG 
I t C— M B a Y au 



PAG alt 

(L 4/19) 



No net service 



Dr. Malone 
Sterling alt 



Comedy Theatre 



Adventure Thea. 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (48, 
includes regularly scheduled programing 9 April 
6 May, inclusive i with possible exception of chaa 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly set 



GRAPH 



9 APR. - 6 MAY. 



*- 



IESDAY 

NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Heckle |eckl< 
Gen. Ml IU tit 



Mighty Moi 



Play Your 



Price Is Right 

Culve 

MllM 



December Bride 



December Brid 



truth or 
Consequences 

■>ig. alt Congo 



Lunch With 
Soupy Sales 



True Story 
Sterling Drug 



Cuu l J Be ¥uu 

Whlleh.ll lit 
Congol, Block 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAO 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAO 

Guiding Light 

E&fl 



No net service 



No net swvici 



As the World 
PAD 



Day In Court 

Lever. A 
Drackett. Tonl 



Beat The Cloc : 



Beat The Cloc 



Who You Trust 



Verdict Is Your 



Verdict Is Your 
Gen Mills 

alt Simonlz 



.a 



Comedy Theatr 



NBA Basketball 



Adventure Thea 



Adventure Thea 



Rocky and 
His Friends 
On Mills 

Kool-Aid 



include time, talent, production and cable c 



Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 
a.m., Monday-Friday, participating 
and 8:45-9 a.m., Monday-Friday 
Eastern Standard. 



p.m.; Today, NBC, 7-9 

; News CBS, 7:45-8 a.m. 

All time periods are 



As advertisers require more marketing, SPONSOR ASKS; 



How much merchandising suppor 
should an agency give a radio /\> 



Agency merchandising services for 
clients, and their proper relation- 
ship to advertising, is appraised 
by three representative agencies 

John P. Warwick, v.p. in charge oi 

operations. Warwick & Legler. lac., V. V. 
The only answer that makes sense 
to me is — a sensible amount. A sen- 
sible amount from the agency stand- 
point would, of course, he relative to 



H 



A sensible 
amount, 
depending on 
particular 
client's needs 



the size of a particular client's appro- 
priation, the nature of the client's 
husiness. the over-all agency service 
being rendered to the client, the depth 
of the agency's staff, etc. 

From the client's standpoint, a 
sensible amount should be related to 
these same factors as well as the 
depth of the client's own marketing 
staff and what would he "fair"" to ex- 
pect and require of the agency. 

Every client-agency relationship is 
an individual case and the answer to 
""how much?"" cannot often be mea- 
sured in terms of dollars, number of 
manhours, number of people, number 
of different services, etc. The "how 
much?" must be individual!) con- 
sidered in each relationship and this 
can best he done when both parties 
-■il down together and take a sensible 
\ iewpoint. 

In a sense, the question vou ask 
pre-supposes that there is a commonl] 
accepted list of marketing services. I 
don't believe this is necessarily true. 

If Id advertising managers or mar- 
keting managers were to make a list 
of marketing services that the) ex- 
pect from their agency, 110 luo li-t~ 
would be exactl) alike. What might 
be important to one company, might 



not e\en he mentioned by another. 
This is another reason why each re- 
lationship is special unto itself. 

The same thing that will make one 
agency superior to another in its 
creative work can also make an agen- 
cy more valuable in its marketing 
contributions. The agency business 
still is. and we hope always will be, a 
business of ideas. If I were a client. 
I would not look exclusively for 
breadth and scope of marketing serv- 
ices; I would look for bright market- 
ing ideas. A 250-page looseleaf mar- 
keting presentation might make for 
interesting reading and lead to an in- 
telligent advertising viewpoint. But a 
sharp, imaginative packaging idea or 
related item promotion or a hot pre- 
mium or a unique discount structure 
idea. etc.. might give my sales a "shot 
in the arm" and could be spelled out 
on a half a page. 

In a nutshell. I believe an agencv 
should offer each client a sensible 
amount of marketing service, depend- 
ing upon the needs and conditions 
and the most important part of the 
marketing service should be imagina- 
tive marketing ideas. 

Robert L. Haag, senior v.p.. Kastor Hil- 
ton Chesley Clifford & Atherton, Inc.. N. Y. 
Much of the material created by 
agencies for support in all areas is 
wasted. This should not lead us to 
invalidate the purpose, but rather to 
question the means of fulfillment. 



Properly 
conceived, 
merchandising 
is integral part 
of campaign 



ProperK conceived and utilized mar- 
keting support becomes an important 
part of the integral program. 

\ program can miss because of 
poor timing. The broker was not 




given sufficient notice and the eff.» 
of his force has already been i 
mitted to the product of anotb 
manufacturer. At the retail level, tin 
ing can also be decisive. The retail 
must have promotional material f 
enough ahead to include it in his oy 
program. 

There are many factors, each j 
which may be the kev. that must 1 
considered at the inception of tj 
planning of a successful back-up pr 
gram. The type of trade, the ph) 
cal size of the product, duration 
the promotion, weight of advertisii 
and the competitive market are 
a few. 

The selection of the right type 
material is equally complex. First 
must be acceptable to the retaili 
Then specific knowledge and consi 
eration must be used to insure its 
ceptance at the local level. M\ 
sonal experience has been that t 
most successful promotions have ( 
curred when the retailer had a ha 
in the design and production of I 
point-of-sale materials to be used 
him. 

Today's competitive marketing co 
ditions mandate that a campaij 
given every available marketing 
sistance. Our promotional suppJ 
has continuously proven beneficJ 
If manv fail, the techniques are sj>J 
ious, not the concept. Failure is J 
methods and should not result in !l 
emphasis on the value of well-'* 
anced. pertinent, coordinated agef 
marketing support. 

Clifford W. Davis, senior i.i>.. di .1 
mdsg., Lennen & Newell, Inc.. \eu 
At Lennen & Newell we believe 
maximum merchandising suppo 
client radio and tv campaigns 
"must"" to ensure effective retun 
our clients' investment. 

B\ merchandising we mean: 

l. Tell and sell the client 

force and trade about the prog 

It stands to reason that client < 

men must be proud of their ass 



i 



SPONSOR 



9 APRIL l 3 



campaign 



pn with a program and convey this 
lthusiasm to wholesalers, brokers 
id retailers. 

j 2. Tie-ins with every phase of cur- 
•nt client marketing effort, includ- 
ig point-of-sale, special offers and 
:asonal promotions. 
3. Establish sponsor identity — 
uild an association in the consum- 
es mind between the sponsor's prod- 




it and the program by using pro- 
am personalities whenever possible. 
Maximum merchandising support 
a '"must" for clients' spot cam- 
iigns as well as for network shows. 
1 We have high regard for local sta- 
' ^'on merchandising personnel, and 
e aware of the steady demands that 
e made on them by every client 
ho buys time. Recognizing this, we 
rovide each station with a practical 
orking kit that contains glossies, 
ats, news items, feature ideas, in- 
rview suggestions and practical and 
lexpensive displays and other mate- 
al which will make a national cam- 
nign more meaningful at the local 
vel. We even include a memoran- 
iim from the merchandising director 
1 the agency to the women's editors 
id feature editors of local papers 
living story outlines for features 
,a«ed on our programs. 
! The local client distributor is in- 
armed that his local stations have 
pen provided with a working kit. 
id we urge him to cooperate with 
lieir merchandising departments. 
' Each station is asked to provide us 
;ith written reports on their activi- 
;es. These reports are carefully read, 
nbulated and discussed with the 
jient in preparation of future mer- 
Jiandising campaigns. ^ 




You Can't 
Score 

From there, 
HANDSHOE 



You have to Buy Broadcast IN 
Lexington to reach the 149,500 
homes in the prospering 30- 
county Lexington retail trading 
area. The five Lexington Broad- 
casters consistently and domin- 
antly influence 559,200 people in 
making $445,793,000 in retail 
purchases and $104,334,000 in 
food purchases. Buying Cincin- 
nati or Louisville won't get the 
job done in Central Kentucky. 
Get your share of $657,165,000 
c. s. i. by buying Broadcast IN 
Lexington . . . the only way to 
reach this rich, growing 30- 
county trading area. 



You Have to Buy LEXINGTO 

to Cover the Rich, Growing 

30-County 

Central 

Kentucky 

Market ^ MSV i LL ^ h 



N 




FROM THE FABULOUS FIVE IN LEXINGTON 

WBIG * WLAP * WVLK * WKYT-TV *WLEX-TV 



i'ONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



J^^<U/KE: WHAFS THE BEST MAIM. 
?robvem ? CHANNEL BUY IN I960? 




Ggencw andCOmlx agm .. 



Your Best Buy is'ABI 



Our Reference: Any ARB 

Represented by: George P. Hollingbery C 

New York, N. Y 
Kettell-Carter, Ind 
Boston, Mass. 




• 



wabi A 



wpor 



HORACE A.HILDRETH,PPE 
WALTER L DICKSON, V. P 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 1 \ 



What's happening in V. S. Government 

that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Legislative 
Oversight subcommittee, has turned the broadcasting industry practically inside 
out, without the passage of a single bill by Congress. 

It appears this week that he will continue adding fuel to the broadcasting fire, and chances 
grow stronger as the days pass that no major legislation inspired by his probes will be 
enacted into law. At least not for another year. 

The regulatory agency ethics bill could still make it this year, but probably only if the 
Senate Commerce Committee will give up its own vested rights to full hearings and due de- 
liberation. Another possibility with this idea which cuts across committee lines lies with the 
Senate Judiciary Committee. That group has already held hearings on its own ethics meas- 
ure and has thus far come up with nothing but disagreement. 

Probably some non-controversial subcommittee report recommendations could make it 
through the adjournment rush this year if Harris decides to spin them out of what amounts 
to an omnibus legislation thus far slated to be considered as a package. Such as strengthen- 
ing FCC powers to forbid payola and plugola and making quiz rigging a crime, new 
laws for which the FCC has asked. 

Harris is pushing his network regulation bill, which includes a tightening up of rules on 
sales of stations to prevent so-called trafficking. Three short days of hearings have been set, 
12-14 April, with ABC d.j. Dick Clark and payola due to shoot back into the limelight about 
21 April. 

Three days couldn't begin to accommodate the flood of witnesses who will wish to testify 
on those controversial matters. And further hearing days, in light of the new payola proceed- 
ings, probably couldn't be set for much before mid-May. Congress aims at adjournment 
in the first few days of July, so the legislators will not miss the political conventions. 

If the other matters are spun off so they can be considered separately, the lack of any real 
opposition could well permit passage even in an adjournment rush. Network regulation 
could have no chance this year, and any other of the many Harris subcommittee recom- 
mendations which are permitted to wait for disposition of the station sale-network regulation 
bill would obviously also die on the vine. 

Unless Congress goes into a special fall session, which is unlikely, we are now in the 
last and frantic half of this second year of the 86th Congress. 






The FCC by a 3-2 vote refused to pull back its horns about its strict sponsor- 
ship identification interpretation, but by a 5-0 tally voted to permit broadcasters to 
have their say about it. 

Bartley was the non-voting Commissioner in both cases. Hyde and Lee voted for suspen- 
sion of the dictate which the broadcasting industry so ardently desired. The industry may 
file its objections until 2 May. 



The deadline for filings on the FCC's proposals to add radio stations to the 
clear channels brought the expected opposition and support. 

Network filings seemed to throw the balance on the side of duplication. CBS radio said 
it would not oppose, though not liking the idea. NBC radio said need in presently unserved 
areas outweighs the likely losses. ABC said it would support a modified idea. 



• 9 APRIL 1960 



55 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



#» FILM-SCOPE 



9 APRIL I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A rundown of especially active shows in the week of the NAB convention 
he taken as an indicator of the sales and programing climate this year in synd 
tion as a whole. 

Only these two shows to be introduced in recent weeks are chalking up sales: 

• CNP's Blue Angels, sold in around 60 markets to Conoco (B&B). 

• Ziv's Home Run Derby, now sold in 112 cities. 

Much business is coming out of these shows that were introduced some months ag< 

• ITC's Interpol Calling has registered 1.25 million in sales, and is in 83 dom< 
markets plus a number of areas overseas. 

• Ziv-UA's The Vikings has reached the 124-market mark. 

• CBS Films' Robert Herridge Theatre, sold in Australia (ABC) and Canada (C| 
both network deals, and is negotiating in Britain (BBC). 

• CNP's Pony Express, reportedly sold to an additional regional client for its entire 
(previously the sponsor used varied shows in each city) . 

The re-run market has also been active; Ziv's Highway Patrol repeats have been 
in 132 cities. (For details on all sales, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 64.) 



Sam Cooke Digges and Robert F. Lewine, administrative and programs chi 

respectively, of CBS Films, will also cover network sales responsibilities until such time 
new CBS Films sales v.p. is named. 

On the syndication side, Jim Victory will handle local and regional sales. 



Three Stooges shorts have scored ratings successes for two consecutive y 
and Screen Gems released additional shorts for a third year this week. 

It was at the 1958 NAB convention that the first 78 Three Stooges shorts were relei 
40 more were added in 1959. The new release of 72 brings the total up to 190 shorts. 

Currently 165 stations are telecasting the shorts; most of the original users also bi 
the second package last year. 

Typically the Three Stooges appear locally in Monday-through-Friday strips betweei 
hours of 5 and 7 p.m., but some stations have worked out other play patterns which 1 
been successful. 

Here are 10 latest ARB ratings for Screen Gems' Three Stooges: 

CITY RATING STATION 

Chicago 13.4 WGN-TV 

Cincinnati 26.0 WCPO-TV 

Cleveland 22.5 WEWS-TV 

Miami 12.2 WTVJ 

Milwaukee 20.1 WISN-TV 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 19.5 WCCO-TV 

New York 19.3 WPLX 

New Orleans 15.8 WDSU-TV 

Seattle-Tacoma 30.9 KOMO-TV 

Washington 18.8 WTTG 



56 



• 9 APRIL I 

11 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The syndication business the past six months has been like a revolving door 
in this respect: more and more regional advertisers kept changing the syndica- 
tors that supply them. 

Of course, many regional spenders are still buying from the same syndicator they've been 
with for several seasons, but note this listing of where the money was spent this year as com- 
pared to the year before: 

REGIONAL ADVERTISER LATEST SYNDICATION BUY 

Ballantine Shotgun Slade (MCA) and 

Johnny Midnight (MCA) 
Blue Plate Foods Shotgun Slade (MCA) 
Conoco Blue Angels (CNP) 

DX Sunray Grand Jury (NTA) 

Lucky Strike Lock-Up (Ziv) and 

This Man Dawson (Ziv) 



LAST YEAR S BUY 

Highway Patrol (Ziv) and 

Bold Venture (Ziv) 
Cannonball (ITC) 
Whirlybirds (CBS Films) 
N. Y. Confidential (ITC) 
S. A. 7 (MCA) 






Popeye cartoons after three years on the air are maintaining ARB ratings of 
15 or more in 133 cities according to a recent UAA study. 

UAA also discovered that Popeye and Warner Bros, cartoons in some markets are actually 
doing better at present than two years ago. 

Here are markets where a marked increase or steady level has been shown: 

CITY STATION NOV. 1957 ARB FEB. 1960 ARB 

Columbus WBNS-TV 13.9 19.1 

Providence WPRO-TV 19.5 24.9 

San Diego KFSD-TV 15.5 18.4 

Spokane KREM-TV 18.7 19.7 

South Bend WSBT-TV 14.9 17.4 

New York WPIX 14.9 14.3 

Los Angeles KTLA 12.0 11.5 



>MMERCIALS 



You can expect an open letter shortly from a major commercials producer at- 
tacking the present price and bidding system in commercials. 

It's understood that he will make some proposals to remedy the alleged evils of loss- 
selling to some clients and price-padding with others — abuses that supposedly arise from 
the bidding system. 

Wallace Ross predicts that at least 1,000 commercials will be entered in the 
First American Commercials Festival next month. 

One unexpected emphasis came out of an analysis of the first entries and the traffic of 
application requests: A large number of advertisers are entering their own commer- 
cials, or asking their agencies to do so. 

Entries for the festival close the week of 18 April; the festival takes place 18-20 May 
in New York and will feature a collection of Commercials Classics of the past ten years in 
addition to competitive screenings of current commercials. 

There are two entirely different effectiveness patterns in commercials using the 
"tradition" approach. 

A Schwerin study of beer commercials reveals that appeals based on traditional qual- 
ity are relatively ineffective unless they are supported by an up-to-date statement of 
specific consumer benefits. 



• 9 APRIL I960 



57 



A round-up of trade talk 
trends and tips for adnu 



SPONSOR HEARS 



9 APRIL I960 

Cwyrlfht 1966 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Don't be surprised if the McCann-Erickson empire goes off into an entire] 
new direction of diversification and acquires things with capital assets. 

What this would lead to: converting the combine into a public corporation and makir 
the stock available to public investors. 



Gillette's deal for the NCAA games with ABC TV sort of pulled the rug froi 
under Schick (B&B). 

Schick had a quarter of the football series last season and it had another option goii 
with NBC TV for this fall. 



The lemon section of the Sunkist Growers account has been listening to agen< 
bids. 

It represents a small segment of the $3 million spent by the cooperative, but the agenci 
making the lemon pitches figure that with this foot in the door the whole thing might 1 
lured away from Foote-Cone-Belding. 

History note: It was the late Albert Lasker, as owner of the agency from which FCS 
derived, who sparked the organization of the citrus cooperative. 



Colgate's Florient (Street & Finney), according to reps, is practicing one c 
those more-for-the-same-money deals come renewal time. 

The product's been using I.D.'s in "C" time, but extension of schedules, say the reps, 
conditioned on bettering the time and at the same money. In other words, a materi; 
increase of rating points. 



Any time you hear that a certain giant account is unhappy and looking aroun 
for another agency, take it with a big grain of salt : it's just exerting pressure. 

What usually results: the top people on the account are fired and a new team's brougl 
in to service it, and even the agency's president personally rolls into action as the No. 1 spar! 
plug. From the viewpoint of the client, the purpose has been achieved. 



The foreign car could turn out an appreciable plus for fm listening. 

Motorola has interested foreign car dealers in Akron in pitching fm receivers to th 
buyers and is backing up the test with a schedule of fm-casting five nights a weal 
for 30 days. 



p 



For oldtimers in radio, Gerald Carson's "The Roguish World of Dr. John I 
Brinkley," just published by Rinehart, will recall those first commercial years <J 
the medium when an assortment of charlatans manned mikes until the FTC chascfl 
them off the air. 

The kingpin of the humbuggers was this Dr. Brinkley, who used a Kansas franchise to r I 
tail goat-gland operations for rejuvenation and. when given the heave from that bailiwicfl 
repaired across the border to a Mexican 50,000-watter. 

Swept off with the gland-man were soothsayers and peddlers of nostrums whoaj 
haul by mail from the gullible mounted into the millions. 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 




BBTV1B 



GMO...50,000 watts of Farm Newspower 




KCMO's farm newspower starts wherever 
the news is breaking ... in a Kansas 
wheat field ... a Missouri livestock feed 
lot ... or a Congressman's office in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Its objective: Deliver today's farm news 
accurately, completely and instantane- 
ously. There's no room for error nor omis- 
sion — millions of dollars will be invested 
by Mid-America's nearly 200,000 farmers 
on the strength of the news they receive. 
That's why KCMO's Director of Agri- 
culture, George Stephens, and Market 
Reporter, Paul Pippert, are so well 
listened-to by farmers. Farm-born and 
reared, these men are career farm journal- 



ists — skilled professionals who know what 
makes news on farms today, and how to 
get all of the story behind the story. And, 
behind them are the far-reaching news- 
lines and special facilities of CBS and 
KCMO's world-wide network. 
This special kind of newspower develops 
a big, strong audience that takes KCMO- 
sponsored 'round the world farm tours 
. . . raises better calves under the rules 
of a KCMO-sponsored contest . . . and 
takes pride in buying the products fea- 
tured on KCMO 

Put your Mid-America farm money on 
KCMO — get the newspower that only 
KCMO can deliver. 



Among those using KCMO's farm newspower right now to gain a 
bigger share of the market for their products are: 



Ford Tractor 

DX Sunray Oil 
Company 

Massey-Ferguson Tractor 



Quaker Oats 
Company 



Murph> 
DeKar 

Colonial Poultry Farms 



KCMO • Radio • Television / Kansas City, Mo. 



i The Tall Tower at 
Broadcasting House 

-BS Radio and TV 



Represented nationally by Katz Agency 



E. K. Hartenbower, Vice President and General Manager 
R. W. Evans, Station Manager — Radio 
Sid Tremble, Station Manager — TV 




r 



t 






FILM does the 
"impossible!" 



/' 



t^ 



k 



PRODUCER: MPO VIDEOTRONICS, Inc. 
ADVERTISING AGENCY: Doyle Dane Bernbach, Inc. 
ADVERTISER: Dreyfus Corporation 



and 


remember)— the 


lion 


g W 

ne w 


all Street. 

th so many other 


com 


als, s 


ome rich with op 


tica 


. . . ome 


\s a 


matter of fact, it's 


film 


akes 


both high-polish 


com- 


}ls a 


id animation pos 


sible 


sure 


> you of coverage anc 


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world-over. 





East Coast Division 



Ne 



v York 1 7, I 



Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 

Chicago 1, III. 

Wesf Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 



or W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution 
of Eastman Professional Motion 

Picture Films, Fort Lee, N.J., 
Chicago, III., Hollywood, Calif. 




, ! ! 



;:!„:„ 



- 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

General Foods Corp., Jell-0 Div., White Plains. N. Y.: Campaign 

to introduce Swans Down Cream Puff & Eclair Mix kicks off latter 
half of this month in about 60 markets in the Eastern, Western and 
Central states. Schedules are for four weeks using early and late 
night minutes, six to 12 spots per week per market. Buyer: Louis 
Fox. Agency: Young & Rubicam, New York. 

Texas Oil Co., New York: Texaco schedules start second week in 
April in about 85 markets. Night minutes and 20's are being set 
for four weeks. Buyer: Bill Santoni. Agency: Cunningham & 
Walsh, New York. 

Procter & Camble Co., Cincinnati: New schedules for Charmin 
Tissues begin this month, run through the P&G contract year. Day 
and night minutes of varying frequencies are being used. Buyer: 
Merrill Grant. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 
Family Products Div., Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co., 
Morris Plains: Going into 20 markets this month with a campaign 
for Bromo Seltzer. Schedules are for nine weeks, fringe night 
minutes. Buyer: Hal Davis. Agency: BBDO, New York. 
Thomas J. Lipton Div., Lever Bros. Co., Hoboken, N. J.: Lipton's 
ice tea campaign starts second week in April in 23 markets and 
expands to about 60 markets by the end of June. Beginning sched- 
ules, in the Southern markets, run for 20 weeks, later ones range 
from six to 10 weeks. Depending on market, buys are for day 
minutes, night minutes or both. Buyer: Bob Anderson. Agency: 
SSCB, New York. 

Mister Softee, Inc., Runnemede, N. J.: Placing schedules to start 
week of 15 April in about 40 markets for its ice creams. Minutes in 
kid shows and prime time announcements, wherever possible, are 
being lined up for six to eight weeks. Buyer : Ed Papazian. Agency : 
Gray & Rogers, Philadelphia. 

RADIO BUYS 

Ceneral Foods Corp., Maxwell House Div., Hoboken, N. J.: 
Campaign starts second week in April for Regular Maxwell House 
Coffee. The top markets pick up eight-week schedules of traffic and 
day minutes. Buyer: Peter Berla. Agency: Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather, New York. 

J. A. Folger & Co., Kansas City: Renewals and new schedules 
begin around mid-April for Folger 's coffee. Minutes and chain- 
breaks will run for four weeks. Buyer: Frank Martin. Agency: 
Cunningham & Walsh, New York. 

Bristol-Myers Co., New York: Placing a test campaign in seven 
Western markets for Trig to start 18 April. Day and traffic minutes 
and chainbreaks are being set for five weeks. Another five-week run 
starts in August. Buyer: Tom Hill. Agency: BBDO. New York. 



61 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



E'S YAR to Mike 
es. The boat they' 
Je from an improv< 



McGreevey (I) and Darren McGavin, stars of NBC TV's "Riverboat" 
re admiring, modeled after the series' "Enterprise," is a new cut-out toy 
■d wet-strength paper bag being test-marketed by American Cyanamid Co. 




ADVERTISERS 



Bristol-Myers has found a 
home for Peter Gunn — this 
son on NBC TV. 

The series' fall slot: Monda) 1< 
11 p.m. on ABC TV. Agenc 
record for Gunn : DCS&S. 

Campaigns: 

• The Rolley Co.'s Sea and 

suntan lotion is making its first i 
into national network tv this sun 
as part of the biggest consumer ( 
paign in its history. The pronrii 
will be spearheaded bv Jack Paa: 
the Jack Paar Show and Dave Gi 
way on Today throughout June 
July via the' full NBC TV lin 
Agency : Foote. Cone & Beldir 

• Technical Ventures Co.. 
troit manufacturers of Blue Cl 
a stock market game, will launcl 
intensive national advertising 
promotional campaign to pror 
this new parlor game. The campa 
to begin shortly, will center arc 
spot tv. Agency: J. H. Altman & | 
Detroit. 




FM DAY, proclaimed in Chicago by \ 
Richard Daley (c)„ joined (l-r) Lloyd 1 
v.p., NBC; William Drenthe, gen 
WCLM, who accepted proclamation i 
half of NAB, Nat'l Assn. of FM B| 




I kih rial report: At a meeting of 
1 Association of Broadcast Execu- 
es of Texas, in Dallas, W. Stanley 
ich, sales training director for 
xize Chemicals revealed that the 
npany's volume in 1959 was $16 
llion. 

vorites: ARB's Best Liked Tv 
mmercials for January shows 
mm's Beer once again in the top 
>t. Runners-up: Maypo, Piels 
3r, Burgermeister Beer, Jello, 
dge, Kelloggs, Mr. Clean, Kaiser 
il and Wriglevs Gum 

hi 

r€ proceedings: Arthur Mur- 

y, Inc., has been charged with 
•ng deceptive promotional schemes 
a decoy to get customers, and with 
ling dance instruction courses 
tough deception and coercion . . . 
lyco Manufacturing Co. has de- 
■d FTC charges of violating the 
itrust laws. The auto seat cover 
„, ^nufacturer was charged with mo- 
holistic exclusive dealing contracts 
:h its retail dealers, and illegally 
ing their resale prices. 



Strictly personnel: Daniel Van 
Dyk elected chairman and Herman 
Johnson, president and chief execu- 
tive officer of Hazel Bishop . . . Rob- 
ert Smallwood, reelected chairman 
of the Tea Council . . . Joseph Lew- 
is, to director of brand promotion 
for The Toni Co. . . . Paul Garrity, 
to v.p. of marketing for Landers, 
Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn. 
. . . William Martin, Jr., to direc- 
tor of advertising and sales promo- 
tion for Congoleum-Nairn . . . Henry 
Hayden, to assistant advertising di- 
rector for Mutual of New York. 



AGENCIES 



RAB's Kevin Sweeney warned 
the radio people and the reps at 
a sideshow session at the NAB 
Convention to beware of agen- 
cies who are "enemies" of radio. 
He took a particular swipe (by 
having girls walk down the aisle with 
bowls of apples) at Burnett, saying 
that it spent but 1.7% of its billings 
on radio and had a research director 



who contends you can't reach the 
mass market with radio. 

Sweeney urged his listeners to 
counteract the enemy 1>\ going ovei 
their heads to clients. 

However, he singled out Esh . \\ n . 
C&W and SSCB as good friends of 
the medium. 

Benton & Bowles, agency of rec- 
ord on the show, is passing up a 
renewal for the fall of This Is 
Your Life (P&G). 

NBC TV, which controls the pro- 
gram, is now offering it for the 
Thursday 10:30 p.m. period at $47,- 
000 gross. 

Agency appointments: Edison 
Electric Institute, for its Live 
Better Electrically program billing 
about $2.5 million, from F&S&R to 
Compton. . . Alitalia Airlines, to 
Gardner . . . Five divisions of the 
Union Tank Car Co., billing $250.(11)0. 
to Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago 
. . . The Washington D. C. Ramble] 
Dealers' Association, to Geyer, 
Morey, Madden & Ballard . . . 
Glamorene. Inc.. manufacturer of 






ISING MONEY for Radio Free Europe 
j radio/tv campaign are presidents (l-r) 
fWd Goldenson, ABC; Robt. Sarnoff, 
ink Stanton, CBS; Don McGannon 
■ shown), pres. Westinghouse Broadcast- 
in of the campaign committee 




SEVEN UP (and all mod- 
els) selected by WTAE-TV 
(Pitts.) to distribute two- 
color, four-page promotion 
tabloids for "Interpol Call- 
ing," featuring authentic 
story-line captions, and I I 
dramatic scenes from series 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE for 

new KEX (Portland, Ore.) 
Careful Commuter Club to 
promote traffic safety, finds 
d.j. Lee Smith and models 
inviting motorists to pick 
up club bumper stickers 




IUCKLES AND NELLIE— a piano-play- 
pig and dancing hen, put forth their 
que show biz talents on WMT-TV's (Cedar 
pids) live-action filmed commercial series 

ONSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 








95,000 

MEANS A LOT! 

If you're looking over your sales 
chart, don't overlook the 95,000 
Spanish-speaking American citi- 
zens in Central Arizona. They 
work and earn American money, 
but you can't reach them through 
your English advertising alone. 
They think in SPANISH. 

That's why they listen to the 
only radio station in Central Ari- 
zona that programs all Spanish — 
KIFN. 

Get your share of this profitable 
market. Sell them in Spanish over 
KIFN! 

We translate your sales message free. 
Production spots available. 

HARLAN G. OAKS X^te^ NATIONAL 
San Francisco ?rc^W* TIME SALES 

Los Angeles ^WJmWS New ^ or ^ City 

San Antonio **»«oc^ and Chicago 

THE BERNARD I. OCHS CO., Atlanta 



*V"£*5 -*\ooo watts ->. 



COVERING PHOENIX AND 
ALL OF CENTRAL ARIZONA 



Glamorene rug, upholster] and oven 
cleaner*, to Duney. Hirsch & 
Lewis, \»\s York . . . Leonet Corp., 
manufacturers and distributors "I 

Magic Tan. with a planned tv and 
radio campaign, to Mohr & Eicoff, 
New York . . . E. Regensburg & Sons, 
for Admiration and Medalist Cigars, 
to Heineman, Kleinfeld, Shaw & 
Joseph . . . Jeanette Glass Corp., to 
Allied Advertising Agency. Cleve- 
land . . . Donrey Media Group- Ne- 
vada Network division, to The 
Melvin Co.. La- \ eg is. 

Merger: The Stanley L. Cahn Co. 
and the George Avis Co.. both of 
Baltimore, have consolidated to form 
Calm-Avis Co. with offices at 1 East 
24th Street. 

New office: Fuller & Smith & Ross 
this week opened a New England 
service office, housed with Ingalls As- 
sociates. Boston, and located at 137 
Xewburv Street. 

They were named v.p.'s: Bruce 
L. Newman, at McCann-Erickson 
1 1 S.A. i . . . Sy Radzwiller and 
West Woodbridge Jr., at Ted Bates 
. . . Barron Boe and Herbert 
Ericson, at BBDO . . . Keith 
Dresser, at Ge\ er. Morey, Madden 
& Ballard . . . David Savage, at 
Lynn Baker. New York . . . Robert 
Ban, at Klau-Van Pietersom-Dunlap 
. . . Robert Rhein, at Stone & 
Simons. Detroit . . . Thomas Covey 
Jr., at The Bresnick Co.. Boston. 

Admen on the move: James 
Wiekersham, named president of 
the SCI Division of Communications 
Affiliates . . . Donald Grawert, to 
tv creative director at Campbell- 
Mithun. Minneapolis . . . Bernard 
Klein, to head the newly-created in- 
dustrial division of Wade Advertis- 
ing, Los Angeles . . . Croswell Bow- 
en, to director of information and 
editorial services at Compton . . . 
Gene Vaslett, to business manager 
of the Los Angeles. Hollywood. San 
Francisco and Houston offices of 
FCB . . . Joan Saltalamachia, to 



WKJR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



media-merchandising supervisor 
Honig-Cooper & Harrington, > 
Francisco . . . Dr. Julian Andorl 
to account research supervisor 
FCB, Chicago . . . Elizabeth G- 
denegger, to media director 
Stern. Walters & Simmons, Chir 
William Casey and Peter Gru 
haus, to account executhes at Jj 
\\ . Shaw Advertising, Chicago . 
John Burnett, to account execut 
at Tracy-Locke Co.. Dallas. 

Add to agency moves: Willis 
Hillenbrand, to executive v.p. 
Lambert & Feaslev . . . John Bur] 
to creative director of Compton . 
Dr. Harvey Queen, to director 
research at Mosul Williams i, Sa 
. . . Henry Norman, to the p 
keting department at BBDO . 
Louis Kennedy, to media sup 
visor at K&E . . . William Nola 
to merchandising director for Foq 
Cone & Belding, San Francisco. 



The importance of proper nt 
chandising in the successful I 
of tv film was underlined l) 
week in CBS Films' award 
Carling Brewing for its handli 
of the Phil Silvers series. 

Carling was the recipient of 
1959 merchandising trophv awa 
by CBS Films. It used 358. 
pieces of point-of-sale material 
behalf of Phil Silvers. 

Sixty-two persons in the Car] 
organization or its agencies will a 
receive an award plaque. 

Carling is the sponsor of Ha 
Silvers repeats in 62 markets. 

Sales: Ziv's Home Run Derb 
Salinas Chevrolet: WSYR-TV. >l 
ruse: Municipal Auto Sales in Mial 
Francis Motor Car on WPTC. 11 
land: Haberle Congress Brewi| 
K \ L I Budweiser distributors I 
Ketchikan. Juneau. Sitka. Kodl 
and Nome; WPSD-TV, PaduJ 
KRNT-TV, Des Moines: KLYD-| 
Bakersfield: KJEO-TV. Fr 
\\ DAF-TV, Kansas Cits : WE\F-| 
Pensacola: KVIP-TV. Redding. 
KPRC-TV, Houston . . . Dennil 
Menace (Screen Gems • soldi 
Granada TV Network and Usoci \ 
Rediffusion in Great Britain 
Zhr-1 I'g The I ikings to Kern's E J 
on WBIR-TV. Knoxville: KXLF-I 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 



announcing 



New York City, May 18-20 




FOR THE FIRST TIME 
a national, professional appraisal of the 
D i 1 1 250 outstanding television advertising messages 
of the year (a retrospective group 
from the past 10 years also) 

selected by a tv commercials council of 
jit advertising men from all sections of the country 
advertising directors of major corporations 
agency creative directors, copy chiefs, 
marketing and tv production heads 



_ 




APRIL 18 DEADLINE FOR ENTERING FILM, 
VIDEOTAPE OR LIVE COMMERCIALS 
SEND FOR ENTRY FORMS AND RESERVATION FORMS 
TO ATTEND SCREENING AND LUNCHEON FORUMS 

Wallace A. Ross Festival Director 

AMERICAN TV COMMERCIALS FESTIVAL AND 

40 E. 49th Street New York 17, N. Y. 
ML 8-2772 



Butte; WJRT. Flint; WCYB-TV, 
Johnstown City; WKYT, Lexington; 
WISVIA. Milwaukee; WCOV-TV, 

Montg m : WSJV-TV, South Bend, 

and KSPG-TV, Tulsa. 

More sales: ITC's Interpol Calling 
to Commonwealth Ldison on WGN- 
TV. Chicago; Piel's Beer on WPIX, 
New ^ork: Pfeiffer Beer in Detroit 
and Grand Rapids; Kiev Packing in 
St. Louis; Sealy Mattress in Pitts- 
burgh; Renault in San Francisco; 
Miller High Life and Pine Crest 
Realt\ in Miami, and First Federal 



Savings and Loan in Orlando: other. 
Interpol Calling advertisers include 
lllii/W cinhard Brewing, Labalt's 
Brewing. Restonic Mattress, Competi- 
tion Motors and Santa Fe Wines . . . 
Ziv's Highway Patrol re-runs to sta- 
tions in Kansas City, Las Vegas, 
Youngstown. and Corpus Christi. 

Programs : Flamingo Films will pro- 
duce a series of cartoons based on 
The Nutty Squirrels recording char- 
acters . . . Telefeatures has acquired 
distribution of 52 Pow Pow cartoons 
in color. 




th/ TV 
MARKET 
IN THE 
NATION 



$2,000,000,000 IN RETAIL SALES 

WOC-TV serves the largest market between Chicago 
and Omaha . . . Minneapolis and St. Louis. 438,480 
TV homes; almost $3 billion in effective buying in- 
come; over $1 billion gross farm income. 

And to help you get the maximum number of these 
dollars WOC-TV specializes in effectively co-ordin- 
ating and merchandising your buy at every level — 
the broker, wholesaler, direct salesman, key buyer 
as well as the retail outlet. 

Further proof of aggressiveness — WOC-TV offers 
the greatest amount of local programming — over 
33 hours each week. 



Your PGW Colonel has all the 
facts, figures and other data as 
well as day by day availabil- 
ities. See him today. 



m 


»« D W.«r,« 


DAVENPORT "I 
BETTENDOIU / IOW * 

ROCK ISLAND ") 

MOLINI > in 





Strictly personnel: Steve KraJ 

named general manager of Sci 
Gems (Canada). Ltd. ... I \ \ | 
accounts executives William 
worth and Bates Halsey to its n 
national sales division . . . Jo 
Jack Cron announced his resigi| 
tion from Bernard L. Schubert. 



NETWORKS 



Network tv gross time billing: 
January increased 10.9% oi 
the like month a year ago, : 
ports TvB. 

The figures, as compiled b\ L\ 
BAR: 

1 1 Total billings for the three i 
works in January were $57,756.] 
against S52.076.179 in January 
2 i Nighttime billings for the fi 
month of this year were 840.496.') 
up 2d', over $33,754,900 for Ja: 
ary 1959. 
3 1 Daytime billings this Janu 
were $17,259,284 a decline of 5i 
for January 1959's 818.321,279. 
4 1 ABC gross billings for Janiu 
were S13.227.680. up 24.2'; 
CBS, S23.578.557. up 6.5', ; and 
NBC. S20.950.030, up 8.6%. 



I 



■£» 



Network tv sales: Albert Cul 

I Wade I for Johnny Staccato, on Al 
TV Sunday, 10:30-11 p.m. . . .Q 
fornia Packing Corp. iMcCai 
to participate in Laramie and Ri 
boat on NBC TV starting in Ma\ 
Simoniz Co. lY&R) to partici 
in daytime Sugar foot/ Bronco 
ABC f V . . . Yardley of Lond 
i \\ei i to sponsor Princess Mai 
ret's Wedding. 6 May. ABC TV. 
I For more on network tv sales. 
Tv Basics, page 45, this issue.) 



Network radio sales: ABC Ra 

reports 33 new or renewal orders 
the first quarter, showing a marl 
increase over the like period last \i 

The just-released Nielsen < 
Per Thousand report covering 
Januarvd^ebruary 1960 period sh 
ABC TV as the network delr 
ing the greatest number 
homes per dollar invested. 

The CPMPCM picture: 
NETWORK JAN.-FEB. 

ABC TV S2.78 

CBS TV 3.17 

NBC TV 4.17 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 15 



!POT PROMOTION ON KVTV DRAWS 
ECORD-SETTING ICE CAPADES MAIL ORDERS 




10 MATTER WHAT 




ORE OF YOUR SIOUX CITY CUSTOMERS ARE WATCHING KVTV 

! 

igs looked bad for the Ice Capades Show in Sioux City last February. Winter storms and flu hit the 
at the same time, and the wrong time. But mail orders from surrounding counties saved the day. 
pie came from as far as 150 miles from parts of four states. The 10 Ice Capades shows drew near- 
icity houses in spite of the weather and flu! The majority of the promotion budget was spent on a 
iration spot schedule on KVTV Channel 9. As Bill Hawkins, promotion director for the Harmon- 
laughlin Enterprises stated: "With things against us the way they were I give TV, especially KVTV, 
lion's share of the credit for saving the show." More proof that no matter what time it is - day or 
it - more people in the Sioux City area watch KVTV. 



P KVTV 

CHANNEL 9 • SIOUX CITY, IOWA 
CBS • ABC 




PEOPLES 


BROADCASTING CORPORATION 


WGAR . . 
WRFD 
WTTM 
WMMN . 
WNAX . . 
KVTV . . 


. Cleveland, Ohio 
. Worthington, Ohio 
. Trenton, New Jersey 
. Fairmont, West Virginia 
. Yankton, South Dakota 
. Sioux City, Iowa 



VSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 




STATION 

IN 

SHREVEPORT, 
LOUISIANA 

Represented l>y 
The Original Statton Representative 

ab q E. Newton Wray, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



WE KNOW OF A TOP FLIGHT 
TV-RADIO PRODUCTION ADMAN 
WHO BELONGS IN A TOP QUALITY 
NEW YORK AD AGENCY . . . 

This young out-of-town adman 
has an unusual depth of agency 
and broadcasting experience in 
radio-tv production, copy, time 
buying and account management. 
Kis strong point is tv and radio 
production and his stack of awards 
rear this out. 

His thorough background in ad- 
vertising, broadcasting and theatre 
makes him a good bit more valu- 
able than most of his contempo- 
raries. If you'd like us to put \ou 
in touch with this out-of-town 
"find." just give me a call. 

\lfrel d. Markim 
\ ice president 
\ T.\. Telestudins 
1481 Broadwav 
New York, N. Y. 
LO 3-1122 



Thisa *n" data: NBC ha? filed an 
application with the FCC for the re- 
instatement of call letters \$ NBC- 
AB-FM-TY for its New York sta- 
tions . . New affiliate: KNTY. 
San Jose, to ABC TY. 

Financial report: For AB-PT. net 

earnings for last year increased 49' < 
— $7.9 million as compared with $5.3 
million in "58. The record gross in- 
come was S287.9 million, up 18 c 7 
over the $244.8 million for 1958. 

Network personnel notes: Ste- 
phen Mann, to sales manager of 
ABC s International Division . . . 
Richard Rector, to commercial pro- 
ducer and William Hallahan. as- 
sistant commercial producer for CBS 
TY production sales. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The National Association of Fm 
Broadcasters, at their meeting 
during the NAB Convention this 
week, adopted a tripart plan for 
promoting the medium. 

The plan, in brief: 

1) All member stations contribute 
the equivalent in money of three 
spots a day. 

2 i Direct a "Discover Fm Radio" 
campaign at listeners, fm manufac- 
turers and dealers. 

3 i Celebrate the first week in May 
as Fm Week. 

The Broadcasters* Promotion As- 
sociation, in a survey of radio 
promotion practices made during 
October and November of 1959. 
came up with these findings: 
1) Seventv-five percent of the sta- 
tions reporting affiliation with a tv 
station said that the promotion de- 
partment was combined with tv's. 
2 i For all stations reporting promo- 
tion, publicity and merchandising de- 
partment, the average number of peo- 
ple assigned to these functions Avas 
3.2. 

3 1 Smaller stations report an 
average of 1.5 people assigned to 
combined promotion, publicity 
and merchandising activities: 
medium size stations, an average of 
2.9: and large stations. 4.4. 
4 i Stations devote an average of 
2.6^ of gross revenues to audi- 
ence promotion. 2.0 f 7 to sales pro- 
motion, and 1.1 r ( to merchandising. 



5 I Audience promotion show a 
low percentage of 0.1 and a i 
of 12.0 f 7 : sales promotion ran 
from 0.05^ to 8'V : while merer 
dising ranged from 0.05 r 7 to 5'. 

6 i Newspapers average 23.8 f V 
the promotion budget: trade n 
azines. 19.4*7 : outdoor abVertis] 
14.7' I : direct mail. 13.2 r 7. and 
presentations and sales aids. 10.7 

7 ■ Eight> -seven percent of the pr 
tion managers report directly b 
general management of the sta:i 
The remaining 13 f 7 are under si 
jurisdiction. 

Ideas at work: 

• They bark in key of 
WINS. New York, is looking 
singing dogs. Owners are bei 
asked, via on-the-air promotions. 
bring their dogs to station's stud 
for auditions. Winner receives 
movie camera and a recording of \ 
dog performing. \T INS is also ai 
ing listeners to send in old battel 
up watches so that thev can be < 
nated to children's classes for use 
educational tovs. Owners of the vx 
interesting beat-uo wEtcbes and th< 
running most inaccurately will 
ceive new ones. 

• Bringing the station into t 
store: WPTR. Albanv-Schenecta< 
Trov has built a broadcastins stud 
in Frear's department store. Tit 
This will give the public a chance 
see the d.j.s. housewives' show a 
"Action Central" newsroom fi 
hand. To further merchandise I 
idea. Frear's plans to include a rac 
in everv store-wide promotion, hi 
dow displav tie-ins announcing 
station, store-wide elevator cards. I 
the WPTR rail letters next to Freai 
in all newspaper advertising. 

Radio station acquisition: WSB 

Great Barrineton. Mass.. to J. L 
Dowd for $122,000, brokered by Pa 
H. Chapman Co. . . . WAXX. Chi 
pewa Falls. Wis., to Jack and 1 
Holden for $106,000, brokered 
Hamilton-Landis & Associates . . 
KUKO. Post. Tex., to Galen Gilbe 
for 150,000. brokered bv Hamilto 
Landis & Associates . . . WINE-Al 
FM. Buffalo, to the MeLendon C »r 
with a change in call letters plan* 
to WYSL. 

New quarters: Standard Rate 
Data Services. Inc.. last week opt 



9 APRIL 19 



I Pacific Coast office at 2975 Wil- 
ire Blvd., Los Angeles. 

>wfmer: WYFM, Charlotte, N.C., 

II be on the air sometime next 
ek. Station's advertising director: 
illiam Vaughn. 

i kiii rial report: Storer Broad- 
sting holds its annual stockholders 
:eting 12 April to report (1) total 
vertising revenues increased sub- 
ntially over 1958 — radio by 7%, 
•by 11% and (2) earnings after 
ces were $5.3 million, up 218% 
er 1958. 

iiisa 'n' data: KTAC, Tacoma 
ash., will air all 154 games of the 
w Tacoma Giants this summer for 
rling Brew, Puget Sound National 
ink and United Pacific Insurance 
Another business note: 
i m la n I Oil of Indiana (D'Arcy) 
sponsor 120 newscasts per week on 
»GN, Chicago. 

ados: Joseph Wolf man, sales 
,Drdinator for the Balaban Stations, 
arded outstanding salesman of 
59 by the Sales Executive Club, 
Diego . . . Paul Greenwood, 
:ount executive at KWIZ, Orange 
untv. presented with the National 
lies Executive Club statuette for dis- 
guished salesman's award . . . 
iW, Hollywood, awarded with a 
olution from the City Council com- 
nding it for outstanding public 
vice in the fight against narcotics. 

oadcasting personnel at net- 
••rk and independent stations 
►roughout the U.S. last week via 
'special closed circuit videotaped 
;cast heard top industry offi- 
ils kickoff a nationwide earn- 
to stimulate public aware- 
is and interest in Radio Free 
irope. 
mong the participators: Robert 
noff, NBC president; Frank Stan- 
CBS president; Leonard Golden- 
AB-PT president; Donald Mc- 
mon, WBC president and chair- 
n of broadcasters for RFE; Gor- 
ji McLendon. McLendon Stations 

fident; and William Murphy, 
pbell Soup board chairman. 
gj picture, page 63.) 



iion staffers: Ben Hoberman, 
eneral manager of KABC, Holly- 
*sor • 9 APRIL 1960 



wood . . . Harold Neal, Jr., to gen- 
eral manager, WABC, New York . . . 
Art Holt, to general manager of 
WYSL (formerly WINE), Buffalo . . . 
Dale McCoy, Jr., to general man- 
ager of KAKE, Wichita . . . Gerald 
Quick, to director of local and re- 
gional sales for WIS, Columbia, S. C. 
. . . Dominic Quinn, to program 
manager of KDKA, Pittsburgh . . . 
Richard McCann, to director of 
community relations at KBON, Oma- 
ha .. . Merle Block, to promotion 
director of KPOP, Los Angeles . . . 
Fulton Wilkins, to account execu- 
tive at KSFO. San Francisco. 



TV STATIONS 



Here's how tv promotion people 
spend time and money, accord- 
ing to a survey by Broadcasters' 
Promotion Association during 
October and November of last 
year: 

1) The average tv station allocates 
3.6% of its annual gross revenues to 
the general promotion area. 

2) Audience promotion is the great- 
est activity at stations, averaging 
2.2% of gross station revenues. 

3) Some 80% of the stations with up 
to a 300.000 set count have full time 
promotion managers; 97% at sta- 
tions with from 301,000 to 700,000 
set count; and 100% with stations 
above 700,000 set count. 

4) The average tv station promotion 
department includes three full time 
people. 

5) Newspapers get an average of 
38.5*/? of promotion's money, and 
trade magazines, 25.3% 

This past week's output from 
TvB: 

• Daytime and late night na- 
tional and regional spot tv bill- 
ings showed the greatest relative in- 
creases in 1959 over 1958. Gross 
time billines last \ ear in the daytime 
were $223,495,000 compared with 
$182,730,000 in '58 while late nisjht 
gross billings totaled $75,702,000 
in '59 compared with $55,878,000 the 
year before. Nisrhttime billings in 
1959 were $306,406,000 against 
$273,162,000 in 1958. 

• Food products represented the 
largest product class in national 
and regional spot tv billings in '59. 
The figures of the top categories: 



% 
PRODUCTS 1959 CHANGE 

Food $165,725,000 I I 18 i 

Drug 53,478,000 (+20) 

Cosmetics & 

toiletries 52.512.000 (+12) 

Ale, beer & wine 47,840,000 ( + 8 ) 
Household cleaners, 

waxes, cleansers, 



polishes 



45,165,000 (+52) 



• Among individual brands, 

here are the largest users, with gross 
time billings, of national and region- 
al spot tv: 

Lestoil $17,627,120 

Duncan Hines mixes 7,209.170 

Maxwell House coffee 6,082.340 

Kellogg cereals 5,953,660 

Mr. Clean 5,796,130 

Alka-Seltzer 5,729,760 

Texize household cleaner 4.611.480 

Wonder bread 3,865.090 

Robert Hall 3,836.490 

Anahist cold remedies 3,812,430 

Folger's coffee 3,722,440 

Avon cosmetics 3,677,040 

Colgate Dental Cream 3,629.920 

Coca-Cola 3,544,560 

Dristan cold remedies 3.542.570 

Cheer 3.333.470 

Profile bread 3.181.840 

Viceroy 3.125.610 

Post's cereals 3.100.540 

Vick's cold remedies 3.061.510 

Clorox 3,027,260 

• And, this analysis by time of 
day and tvpe of activitv during 
1959: 



TIME OF DAY 


AMOUNT % 


Day 


$223,495,000 36.9 


Night 


306.406.000 50.6 


Late night 


75.702.000 12.5 




$605,603,000 100.0 


TYPE OF ACTIVITY 




Announcements* 


$460,706,000 76.0 


Programs 


80.385.000 13.3 


I.D.'s 


64,512,000 10.7 




$605,603,000 100.0 


^includes partici 


pation 



The raking-over that tv and ra- 
dio has been getting in Wash- 
ington may have something to 
do with this: 

Woodlawn residence, a 
torv for University of Chicago 
students, began a serie- 
modern communications wil 
lineup of top brass scheduled to 
sreak before the relatively obscure 
group: 

Jim Beach. ABC TV v.p. in 



charge of central division sales in 
Chicago; Clark George, CBS TV 
\.|).. Chicago; Ed Shurick, execu- 
tive v.p., Blair-TV, Nevt York; Pete 
Cash, TvB; and Dan Tennant, 
Leo Burnett \.|>.. t<» name just a few. 
The lectures, which began last 
week, will run through 10 June, open 
t<> the public free of charge. 

Zenith Radio Corp. has completed 
arrangements with RKO General 
for the latter to conduct a three year 
trial run of subscription tv in 
Hartford, Conn., using Zenith's 
"over-the-air" Phonevision system. 

It is contemplated that, after FCC 
authorization, the test will be con- 
duced over WHCT. which RKO Gen- 
eral has contracted to purchase from 
Capitol Broadcasting. Inc. 

Ideas at work: 

• To teach wife appreciation 
to husbands: WKTV, Utica Rome, 
Y V. recently conducted a "Deserv- 
ing Wife" contest. The idea: station 
asked men viewers to write why they 
felt their respective wives deserved a 
night out. The prize: six nights out 
for dining and dancing. Station also 
provided the baby sitters. Results: 
some 900 letters and cards were re- 
ceived. 

• Hood news: WOW-TV, Oma- 
ha, last week presented a special half- 
hour documentary dubbed Rivers on 
the Romoase. The program featured 
the best film taken by station new r s- 
men covering the Platte Valley floods. 

This 'n' data: Convention sidelight 
— John McMillin, executive editor 



In New York City 



has MORE 
Negro programming 

than ALL other 
stations combined 



of SPONSOR, while in Chicago cover- 
ing the NAB Convention last week, 
appeared as a panelist on the At Ran- 
dom show, WBBM-TV, Saturday, 
midnight to 3 a.m. . . . TvB reports 
that insurance companies upped 
their tv use in 1959 by 44% . . . 
Sports note: KPLR-TV! St Louis, 
will telecast 40 Cardinal baseball 
games this season . . . WAVY-AM- 
T V, Norfolk - Portsmouth -Newport 
News, has had its newsman travel 
some 12,000 miles during the past 
30 days to cover the area's news 
events . . . Anniversary note: WTVT, 
Tampa-St. Petersburg, this week cele- 
brates its fifth birthday. 

Kudos: KREM-AM-TV, Spokane. 
seven first place awards out of nine 
radio and tv news categories in the 
annual event sponsored by Theta Sig- 
ma Phi and judged by members of 
the NBC news department . . . 
WBBM-TV, Chicago, awarded a 
"Special Citation" for outstanding 
news film coverage in the "News Pic- 
tures of the Year" competition spon- 
sored bv Encyclopedia Brittanica, the 
University of Missouri School of 
Journalism and the National Press 
Photographers Association . . . 
WSTV, Inc., cited in three separate 
awards for outstanding; safety record 
last year at the Annual Safety Awards 
Banquet sponsored by the Jefferson 
County Industrial Safety Council, the 
Steubenville Chamber of Commerce. 
and the Industrial Commission of 
Ohio. 

On the personnel front: Virgil 
Evans, to assistant general manager 
of WCSC, Inc.. Charleston. S. C. and 
national sales manager of WC5C-T\ 
. . . Edward Sheaffer, to director 
of continuity acceptance of the Tri- 
angle Stations . . . Ed Dunbar, to 
head the national sales office of 
KNDO-TV, Yakima . . . Leonard 
Traube, to director of information 
services and advertising for WCB5- 
TV, New York . . . Herb Homes, 
to executive producer of WPIX. New 
York . . . Bill Bailey, to operations 
manager of KVJI-TV. Amarillo. 



WN JR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Adam Young this week formal 
opened its southern company 
Southern Advertising Represer 
ative, Inc. 

Unlike other Young compan 
SAR will operate on a regional bt 
only, with its sales territors embif 
ing a 15-state area. 

Hal Parks, formerly eastern sal 
manager of Young Tv, will head t 
new company. Headquarters are ] 
cated at 1182 West Peachtree Stra 
Atlanta. 

Rep appointments: Cascade 
properties (KIMA-TV, Yakir.i 
KEPR-TV. Pasco. Wash.: KBAS-"! 
Ephrata. Wash.: and KLEW-T 1 
Lewiston. Ida. i to Young Tv 
WMAK. Nashville, to George 1 

Hollingbery Co WEAN. Pn.v 

dence. to Kettell-Carter, Boston. 
New England representative. 

Thisa 'n' data: PGW's Chicai 
office has installed video tape fat 
ties . . . New quarters: For joe 

Co. this week moves to 230 Pa^ 
Avenue. New York . . . Kudi 
Harry Smart, v. p. and midwest ■ 
manager of Blair-TV ? s Chicago offia 
honored by WBNS-TV. Columbl 
0.. as Chicago's "first" tv statiq 
rep. 

Rep appointments — personne 
Alfred Parenty, promoted to eai 
ern sales manager at Young T\ 
Stanley Bloom, to director of ma 
keting at CBS Radio Spot Sales . 
Robert Barrett, to assistant dire 
tor of sales development and researc 
at George P. Hollingberv . . . G 
Thompson, to account executive fc 
CBS Radio Spot Sales. Chica; 
Peter Yaman. named sales repri 
sentative for TvAR . . . Eour ne 
v.p.'s at Averv-Knodel: John Toi 
mey. for radio. New York: Thoma 
White, for tv. New York: Rogt 
O'SulIivan. for radio. Chicago; a: 
Raymond Neihengen. for tv. tl 
cago . . . Executive staff realignrm 
at Intercontinental Services. Lt< 
Harry Engel. Jr.. to president ai 
general manager: Walter Stasko 1 
executive v.]).: Jeanette Sytsm 
v. p. and treasurer: and John Ban 
ton, v.p. and sales manager. 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 19% 



AREA PULSE 

PROVES 

KFMB RADIO 

HAS 



i 



THE BIGGEST AUDIENCES* IN 
FOUR**SOUTHERN CALI- 
FORNIA COUNTIES, BURSTING 
WITH NEARLY 2,000,000 
PROSPEROUS PEOPLE***! 



a Survey, Nov.. '59 San Diego. Riv 



— Sales Management Survey. May. '59 



KFMB RADIO o SAN DIEGO 



A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 
[EdwardYp*try *Yco., ■"«) 



)NSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 



FIRTH 

* Continued from page 40) 
the show is on 9:30-10 a.m. Points 
out Firth director of merchandising 
John Tharrett. "We welcome the con- 
tiruii(\ produced when the female 
broadcaster doing a local show urges 
her viewers to stay tuned for Spot- 
lighting You. and a few minutes later 
the same woman delivers our live 
commercial." 

\\ hereas the show was entirely live 
during its testing stage, all of the cur- 
rent version but the commercials is 
on film. Guy Cornell. Firth's decora- 
tor consultant, acts as m.c. assisted 
b) mistress of ceremonies Tykie 
Casey, active in West Coast tv. Each 
show revolves around a particular 
home decorating theme — use of art 
objects, lighting, care of furnishings, 
how to decorate at various budget 
levels, etc. — is discussed by guest 
experts and housewife panelists. 

Midway in the half hour the scene 
shifts to the station for the three- 
minute live commercial. When the 
show resumes, Tykie Casey passes on 
a hint or two about care and use of 
the carpet and turns the show over 
to Guv Cornell. Discussion continues 



and the panelists ask questions of 
the \ biting experts and Cornell, often 
picking up considerable free advice 
as to decorating approaches that 
would suit their particular coloring, 
type of homes, size of family. 

Toward the end. Cornell presents 
the panelists with new hats. "It adds 
a great deal of color and excitement 
to see the ladies opening hat boxes, 
spilling tissue paper all over the place 
and trying on their new hats, he 
says. Then he sums up the main points 
brought out on the show . Tykie Casev 
pitches viewers on the free Firth 
decorating book and that's the show. 

The Firth ; Doner crew taped i for 
subsequent filming i the current series 
of 10 half hours out in San Francisco 
over a four-and-one-half day period. 
"I want to tell you that was hectic." 
agency producer-director Bob Bleyer 
hastens to add. "That's all the time 
that was available at the studio we 
used, and I still don't see how we did 
it. We selected San Francisco as our 
base of operations, because out there 
most of the people talk without a 
noticeable accent, so we could readilv 
recruit guests whose voices will fit in 
anvwhere the shows run." ^ 



WO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND 



(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1320.100 Drug Sales $ 40,355.0(Xi 

Households 423.600 Automotive Sales $ 299,539.000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise $ 148.789,000 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales $ 300.486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 75.9% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to November 1959 ARB we average 75.9°o share of audience from 
Sign On to Sign Off 7 days a week. 

CBS • A B C 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 

Manufacturers of quality upholstered 




KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 

Photo: Selig Manufacturing Co., Monroe, ho 



TV COPY TESTING 

[Continued from page 38 • 
A-Matics — adopted by SSCB strr^ 
for a total effect, explains Healy. " 
tr\ to duplicate the viewing >ituat 
and this calls for a blending of so 
and picture with movement ral 
than still shots." But bridging 
gap between the real viewing si 
tion and a synthetic one is the pi 
lem copy testers face. 

Robert Aledort. research dire< 
of Erwin. Wasey, Ruthrauff i R\; 
says it's "a little like trying to le< 
how to hit a golf ball without ha\i 
a ball. The most important com] 
nent in tv commercials is the to 
effect — yet how can you get a tc 
effect without a finished commercii 
That's the nut of it. 

And how measure response to ei 
a partial effect? "Such tact' 
believability and comprehension, f 
criteria usually used in determinati 
of a successful selling commerei 
are only two drops in a big 
Reactions to a commercial also oct 
as a result of what you dont say a 
what you don't show !" says Aled 

He and his associates agree tl 
reactions to television commerei 
are psychologically complex, and 
this hurdle of omission in pre-tf 
which they're trying to sidetrack 
overcome. 

The best known independent c 
panv which pre-tests commercial: 
Schwerin Research Corp. It ha: 
long list of pre-test clients, for p 
grams as well as for commercials z 
for both rough and finished connrj 
cials. The Schwerin technique m< 
frequentlv provides for 350 pels 
to attend screenings in the compai 
New York theater, where they 
«iven detailed questionnaires co 
ing "hidden" points of inquiry. 

Results of the tests — phrased 
terms of index points measuri 
"selling power" — can then be trai 
lated into action by the agencv i 
client in iai revising certain p 
tions of a commercial or i b i tak 
an entirely new tack. 

In a recent case. Schwerin te~t 
five rough commercials for a n 
instant food product. A differ 
copy point was featured in each. 1 
the demonstration technique ' a st£ 
up. announcing situation I was 
same in all. Indexing maximum k 
tification and success at 100 for 
of the copy points, the compi 



nked two other points at zero, the 
her two at 50. Thus only one of 
3 roughs was really validated in 
ms of suggesting final, finished 
mmercial production. 
Schwerin seems to do the most 
ntinuous pre-testing of television 
mmercials, but there are many oth- 
companies in the field. Among 
im: Amro Research, New York; 
rke Market Research, Cincinnati; 
stitute for Motivational Research 
>r. Ernest Dichter), Croton, N. Y.; 
itional Research Service, New York; 
ychological Corp., New York; 
linion Research, Princeton, N. J.; 
an C. Russell Marketing Research, 
m York; Social Research. Chicago; 
iniel Starch & Staff, New York. 
Another company, Communica- 
ns and Media Research Services, 
:., Peekskill, N. Y., this week in- 
duced its new closed circuit tv 
ting service which attempts to pre- 
;t effectiveness. William Capitman, 
esident of the firm, introduced his 
rvice to admen in Los Angeles this 
'st week, explaining that the tech- 
jae "provides an opportunity to 
insure directly the effect of com- 
brcials or television shows on sub- 
■puent purchase behavior and view- 
» habits." 

Still another phase of the pre-test- 
problem has yet to be resolved: 
10 pays for it? Agency profit mar- 
is, already slim, could "evaporate 
o nothingness if we were to pick 
all pre-testing tabs," said one 
ency executive vice president, 
hat's why testing is really done 
,ly in crucial situations, largely 
ten a completely new idea, a new 
oduct or a new campaign theme is 
ing considered. But even limited 
tin? costs from $300 to $500 for a 
ash commercial." 

The practice generally has been for 
agency to provide the strategy 
d know-how as part of the client 
vice. But all out-of-pocket expense 
well as a portion of the overhead 
)r technical equipment, studios, 
.) is billed to the advertiser. 
There's no standard operating pro- 
lure, however, and there's a clamor 
>m both sides of the advertising 
iice — agency and client — to set 
ne rules by which the pre-testing 
5ts are affixed. 

One fact is sure, though, comment- 
a research chief: "Research is not 
eap, and the best kind of research 

onsor • 9 APRIL 1960 



is outright expensive. The key to suc- 
cessful pre-testing is in the careful, 
professional pre-planning and set- 
ting down of client objectives. A re- 
searcher can't write copy, but he can 
explain to a writer if his creative idea 
has been successful or not — and why. 
Most of the worth of any research 
project hinges on the strategy and the 
creative planning of the researcher." 

This means, as the increase in cli- 
ent demand for pre-testing of tv copy 
grows, that the researchers themselves 
will have to be more experienced and 
higher-priced. Agencies will be com- 
pelled to add technical equipment to 
their facilities. And these add up to 
a still bigger tv investment for adver- 
tisers, but one which must be made, 
admen agree. 

"After all," commented one. "it 
sounds exhorbitant to spend — say — 
S3. 000 testing a commercial idea. But 
if that idea keys a $400,000 campaign, 
the money is cheap insurance!" ^ 



MARKET MYSTERY 

(Continued from page 35) 
"The most sensible way to solve the 
problem is through additional spec- 
trum space to be obtained from such 
non-commercial broadcast groups as 
the government. But we'd better be 
careful about dropping in extra sta- 
tions; radio interference is bad 
enough, but in tv. interference be- 
comes intolerable." 

As for the advertising industry, 
such interference could be very seri- 
ous. If tv circulation were reduced 
by it, AMST points out, agencies 
would no longer find tv quite as at- 
tractive a medium. "And it can hap- 
pen," Lindow said. "Quite recently 
in attempting to add a third station 
to a two-station market it resulted in 
adversely affecting 19 other stations." 

A box score of the number of tv 
stations in U. S. markets would go 
something like this: there are 14 mar- 
kets with four or more channels; 59 
markets that offer a choice of three 
channels; 67 two-channel markets, 
and 124 markets with only one tv 
channel. The two-channel markets, 
many of considerable size, are chief 
bones of contention. 

So the long-time struggle goes on 
— round after round, year after year. 
Whether 1960 will be the year of 
solution is questionable. But one 
safe bet: the eyes of the industry will 
be on FCC starting 19 April. ^ 




WTAD 



IS THE MOST! 

• MOST COVERAGE'* 

• MOST PROGRAMMING! CBS (Of course) 

• LOWEST COST PER: THOUSAND OF 
ANY OTHER MEDIA IN THE MARKET! 
•NCS #2— Pulse Oct. '5? f "^'^- 
WTAD FORWARD^T\ 
V¥ ■ ** l/ ySbROVP* 

QUINCY, ILLINOIS V^ 

See Branham Co. National Representatives 




While serving a single 
station market, WTHI-TV 
fulfills its public service re- 
sponsibilities in a way that 
has gained for it the appre- 
ciation and support of its 
entire viewing area ... a cir- 
cumstance that must be re- 
flected in audience response 
to advertising carried. 

Five full Y 2 hours of local 
ublic service program- 
ling each week. 



WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 CBS • ABC 

TERRE HAUTE 



YOU 
KCAN'T 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 



KCEN-TV 




WATTS UP, DOC? 

We're the only maximum 
power 100,000 watter in 
in the Waco -Temple 
market! (And our antenna 
is 833 feet up!) 



||0 

CHAN 



NEL^^7 



CEN-TV 



^ 



and radio 

WSMAKER 



|p 




William H. Schwarz joins Peters. Gt 
fin. \\ oodward as manager of progn 
services. His work will entail counsel! 
PGW's stations in all areas of program 
tivity. Schwarz' previous posts in p 
graining were as program director 
both KDKA, Pittsburgh, and WCCO. Mi 
neapolis, where he created Minnesota Ml 
stones. Schwarz started his career as a pa 
at CBS. remained there 14 years, producing and directing many I 
shows. He was also exec producer with KYW, Philadelph 

Harold L. Neal, Jr., takes over as general 
manager of WABC. New York. He comes 
from WXYZ, Detroit, where since 1943 he 
held a variety of posts including staff an- 
nouncer, promotion manager, asst. sales 
manager and director of sales. In 1956 he 
was named general manager of that station. 
Neal is currently a member of the board 
of directors of the Michigan Association 

of Broadcasters. In his new capacity at WABC he succeeds 
Hoberman, who is joining KABC, Hollywood, as general manage 

Charles Keyes has been appointed j 
eral manager of KVII-TV, Amarillo. 
has been in the broadcasting industry i 
nine years, having started his career wl 
KCBD-TV in Lubbock, Texas. Two yea 
later, he joined KWTV, Oklahoma Cit 
and in 1957 he became commercial man 
ger of KOCO-TV, in the same city. Key 
was made general manager of that static 
in that capacity until March of this year, whe 
he moved to the Trigg Vaughn station. KVII-TV is an ABC outle 

Leonard E. Hammer has been named di- 
rector of the newl\ created National Sales 
Div. of United Artists Associated. This de- 
partment will follow up and assist stations 
in obtaining full sponsorship for its present 
and future features. Hammer joined UAA 
in 1957 as station sales coordinator. Be- 
fore that, he was account executive for 
WABC-TV, New York and acct. exec on 
syndicated properties at MCA-TV. Hammer was with Adam You 
in 1949. heading its tv activities in N. Y. He hails from W 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL 199 




in 1958, remaining 




IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western Nevada 




eline station radio broadcast markets are fertile 
th sales potential. For example, in Bakersfield — 
'me city of KERN — retail sales are even greater 
jm in Erie, Pa. (with almost 3 times more popula- 
jn) and San Bernadino, Calif, (almost twice as 
;!).* 

Kern County, with Bakersfield its county seat, pro- 
:es a quarter of all the State's oil . . . is the third 
gest agricultural county in U. S. . . . is important 
mining, food-processing, metal fabrication and as 
iistribution center. 

The most effective way to beam your radio mes- 
je into the thriving Bakersfield market is on KERN, 

Beeline station in Bakersfield. 
As a group, Beeline stations give you more radio 
mes than any combination of competitive stations 
. at by far the lowest cost per thousand, 
ielsen & SR&D) 
■les Management's 1959 Survey of Buying Power 

5NSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 




Kern County Administrative and Courts Building 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO., 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Isn't it time for van to take "a good long look" at your research on individual 
markets? Yes, says, W . Thomas Hamilton, general manager, WNDU-TV, 
South Bend, Indiana. Most agency timebuyers, Hamilton believes, are still 
using outdated market information in planning campaigns. Unless a buyer 
is equipped with the latest statistics, he is ignoring a vital responsibility to 
his clients — to provide them with effective, accurate information. Perhaps 
you have an opinion that wants airing; send it to "The Seller's Viewpoint." 



LET'S TAKE ANOTHER LOOK AT THE RECORD 




I he year-end roundup and things-to-come editorial com- 
ments by a variety of agency personnel offered a recurring 
theme, as we moved into the 1960 season, that there would 
be "more market research," "a closer look at individual 
markets" and the inevitable "maximum exposure in mar- 
kets for minimum costs." 

If there ever was a time for agencies to take a good long 
look at their market-by-market expenditures for their cli- 
ents and match them up with the coverage and cost of their 
coverage, I would like to suggest an old bromide that used 
to stare at me from the back of my boss's desk every time 
he called me on the carpet."DO IT NOW." 

Timebuyers for the agencies have a heavy responsibility 
to their clients to select the markets that will give the best 
coverage and cost-per-1,000 buys. But many agency time- 
buyers, for one reason or another, are not equipped with 
the latest information on market coverage situations. 

In a business with the quicksilver quality of tv, time- 
buyers cannot justify market buys based on obsolete mar- 
ket figures. Moreover, unless their research is reasonably 
current, they cannot possibly recommend market buys 
which would provide an accurate consumer-product rela- 
tionship for their clients. 

For example, in South Bend we have a three-station 
market, a uhf island with all network services. Three 
years ago a rating survey deprived the three stations in 
this market of 70,000 tv sets because of vhf coverage 
from Chicago, III., and Kalamazoo, Mich., both of which 
stations give only Grade B signal strength in most of the 
South Bend-Elkhart market but do not provide one iota of 
local coverage for the communities in this market. 

Three years later — despite the continuing growth of the 
market, an amazing increase in all-channel set sales, con- 
centrated local programing for the local communities in 
the market, increasing public service, elaboration and re- 



finement of equipment, techniques and services — timebu 
ers are still determining the potential of this market wit 
out taking a single one of the above factors into consider 
tion. They continue to buy Chicago and Kalamazoo b 
cause that's what the survey told them three years ago. 

If the agencies are too busy to research markets then] 
selves, I would think they would at least update the inf< 
mation on which they base their market buys. 

If they want facts, I would like to supply some. Thes 
are not my figures nor my statements, but I think they wi 
bring out the fact that what might have been three yea 
ago "ain't necessarily so" today. 

The McCaffery Co., Westinghouse distributor in Sout 
Bend: "Our tv set sales are running 95 f 'c all-channel t 
5% vhf. Eighteen months ago, LaPorte County w 
practically all vhf set sales. Now the situation is con 
pletely reversed and vhf has become almost a nonentity. 
Radio Equipment Co., the Philco distributor in tl 
Indiana-Michigan area: "In LaPorte county, which wi 
nearly all vhf 18 months ago, we sell practically no vl 
sets. That area is almost completely uhf." 

The important aspect in these comments is that in L 
Porte County the agencies, based on a Nielsen report < 
over three years ago, do not credit the three uhf statior 
with a single tv set; yet the three South Bend stations a 
the only ones who program specifically for these area 
Obviously, if the all-channel set sales have increased th 
much, people are watching the three South Bend station 
that program for them and give them the local recogniti< 
they cannot possibly get from the Chicago and Kalamazi 
stations who are actually credited with coverage. 

These are the reasons I feel that timebuyers and ageno| 
research people should follow the editorial theme of the 
vear-end statements and take another look at the markc 
by-market picture as it is right now. 



SPONSOR • 9 APRIL \9(A 






WSB RADIO 

FIRST IN AUDIENCE 

92% OF THE TIME 




The Voice of the South / Atlanta 

( EdwirdYpelry *Yco„ Inc.) 



Latest Nielsen on Atlanta reveals a handsome 

bonus being shared by WSB Radio advertisers. This 

station's audience was up 18% in the morning, up 10% in 

the afternoon. Nighttime dominance over the 

field was more marked than ever! 

Of total quarter-hour periods measured WSB Radio was 

first in audience 464 times. Station No. 2 led 

28 times and Station No. 3 was first 6 times. 

In March WSB Radio enters it 39th year of service 

to the South. And for each consecutive year 

this station has been the overwhelming favorite of 

Southern listeners. Certainly your advertising 

in Atlanta belongs on WSB Radio. 



iliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. NBC affiliate. Represented by Petry. Associated with WSOC WSOC-TV, Charlotte: WHIO, WHIO-TV, Dayton. 
NSOR • 9 APRIL 1960 " 



^ 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



A cause for the whole industry 

No other branch of American society is more often called 
upon to support worthy causes than is the radio/tv business. 
No other industry responds more generously with time, 
money, and hard work. Sometimes it seems as if the demands 
on broadcasters were never-ending and even a little bit unfair. 

But the announcement last week by Leonard Goldenson, 
Frank Stanton, Robert Sarnoff, and Don McGannon of a spe- 
cial and unprecedented drive by the industry in behalf of 
Radio Free Europe, is an entirely different kind of appeal. 

Radio Free Europe is not merely a great crusade for truth 
and freedom, which in 10 years has constantly and courage- 
ously challenged Soviet power, and given hope and comfort 
to the subjugated peoples of the satellite countries. 

Radio Free Europe is a constant symbol and reminder of 
the power of broadcasting as a force for good in the world. 
It is broadcasting in the firing line, broadcasting throwing 
all its might into the realities of the Cold War, broadcasting 
as our first bulwark of defense. 

Because of this, the industry's plan for a special $10 mil- 
lion drive in behalf of Radio Free Europe deserves energetic 
support by every radio/tv man. The drive for RFE funds 
will extend from 24 April to May 8. It will employ every one 
of the air media techniques which has revolutionized mod- 
ern marketing. And its success in soliciting contributions 
from millions of Americans will do much to silence the 
cynics and scoffers who doubt our industry's importance. 

Clarify the free plug rules 

We say this respectfully. But as we go to press, the FCC 
has not yet acted to clear up the confusion and dismay pro- 
duced by their rulings on phonograph record announcements, 
and we think they should act and act quickly. 

Broadcasters, and we have talked to many of them, have 
legitimate complaints. The FCC interpretation imposes ab- 
surd burdens on stations who genuinely want to obey the law. 

this we fight FOR: Constant efforts by 
all advertisers and agencies who are using air 
media to sec that their commercials are not only- 
honest and truthful, but are also in good taste. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Direct action: The following lei 
was received at WSB-TV, Atlanj 
from a rabid fan in the "Popi 
Club.'' 

"One afternoon I got a little m 
at Bluto for beating up Popeye. 
got my brother's air rifle and sh 
Bluto. The tv repairman said 
aim was very good because I 
the screen right in the middle, 
shattered into a million pieces, 
sister ran and told my mother 
she sat down and cried. I am a 
sorry I was so naughty and I a 
trying very hard to be good." 

Kookie? In Billings, Mont., therj 
a station with call letters KO0| 
Music to comb your hair by. 

Suggestion: TV Guide reports tU 
a tv owner in Reading, England, sa 
her retriever dog got sick whl 
watching a televised medical 
gram about a dog with rabies. 
know how he feels; we watch Bq 
ferin commercials. 

Tv's Codiva: The Jack Paar Sh 
got another scissors-on-tape I 
ment from NBC TV the other i 
while Paar was in England and . 
lene Francis held down the N. 
front. Guest Julie Wilson tucked hflH 
dress between her legs, did a hanfflj 
stand, and the dress slipped. WhW^ 
Jack's away, the guests still play. I 

Heading: From an ABC Radio M 
lease— THIS IS ZSA ZSA. NEW i\ 
A-WEEK SERIES SPOTLIGHTING 
THE NOTABLE GABOR. MAKEll 
ITS DEBUT MARCH 21. Exquisiti 
Form Brassiere To Sponsor. 1/"'/' 
for each other. 

Payola: Following release was seal] 
by "Hardwick," d.j. at KVI, Seattlj 
— "Seattle dee jay 'Hardwick' 
openly admitted today acceptance o 
payola from his wife, Ruth. It haj 
pened on Mar. 21st at Virgini 
Mason Hospital. Explains Mrs. Hard 
wick, 'As payment for 3.466 men I 
tions on the air that I was pregnani 
I have just presented him with i 
7 lb. 4 oz. new girl. . . ." Try tha 
on for size, Mr. Congressman. 

Heading: From N. Y. Herald-Trib 
une^-NO VIOLENCE BEFORE 
P.M. ON BRITISH TV. Hold th§\ 
I ninth: it's only 8:40. 

SPONSOR • 9 APRIL I960 



re 

i 



RDER YOUR OWN 
ERSONAL COPY OF 
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ENT TO YOUR 
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REPRINTS? BACK COPIES? " 

Service will do its best to assist you with your 
needs at economical cost. 



Xext time you have a question, give us a cal I 
or jot down your request on the attached card I 
A Headers' Service representative will be glad I 
to help you. 




17,015,583,000 



MULTI-CITY TV MARKET 




effective buying income 

The WGAL-TV market is a great market of 
plenty. Multi-eity, prosperous, stable, this is a 
response market for your product or service. 
WGAL-TV reaches the people who go out to buy, 
for its audience is greater than the combined 
audience of all other stations in its coverage area. 

(See ARB or Nielsen surveys.) 

WGAL-TV 

Lancaster 
NBC and 



*r, Pa. 

I CBS 

- 



STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



The MEEKER Company, 



the first 1U years 








w 



hen WDOK began broadcasting in April, 
1950, it resolved then to become an impor- 
tant factor in the Cleveland broadcasting 



It had excellent equipment and played the 
world's greatest music. But, WDOK had an addi- 
tional asset — the most devoted broadcasting pio- 
neers whose aims were to make WDOK a vital 
part of the community, not only by providing fine 
and wholesome entertainment, public service fea- 
tures and accurate news but — over-all, to present 
better musical programs. 



WDOK has proved this point throughout th 
ten years as shown by audience loyalty, praise 
newspapers, public service awards, and intei 
shown by institutions and private enterprise. 

To prevent any loss of air time, WDOK recenfl 
installed its second AM transmitter — the rem 
modern high-fidelity transmitter available, both! 
dependability and performance. 

Yes, a broadcasting station has to have son 
thing "special" to excel in Northeastern Ohio. ^ 
think that we have demonstrated that we have w| 
"Better Music for Northern Ohio" — 1260 
your radio dial in Cleveland with 5,000 fulltul 



WDOK 



FREDERICK WOLF. GENERAL MANAGER 

THE CIVIC BROADCASTERS. INC. 

1515 EUCLID AVENUE. CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Represented nationally by Broadcast Times Sales, lA 






16 APRIL I960 
40* a copy* $8 a year 



SP 



M4770JI 



floe* 



SOR 






II 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



for muscle in your marketing . . . 

Pick any one . . . 

or two ... or three 
£fc~ or four ... or five! 




MEDIA'S NEW 
MR. BIG: 
THE ANALYST 

Agencies are turning 
to new type of media 
expert. Media analyst 
groups guide ad buys 

Page 29 

If you think you 
have it tough— 
a Texas saga 

Page 36 

Who's who in 
cigarette 

radio/tv 

Page 38 

How to use the 
new syndicated 
research service 

Page 42 




TV-CHANNEL 4 • RADIO-5000 WATTS 

0COLIM1BU5, Gil.® 

Represented by George P. Hollingbery Co. 




Daytime Minute* 




OR • 16 APRIL 1960 



BALANCED 
PROGRAM- 




MEANS 

LISTENER 

LOYALTY 



... and 30 years of KTRH 
programming has devel- 
oped a pattern of listener 
loyalty blanketing over 80 
counties, serving over 
1,087,100 radio households 
and extending over 60,000 
square miles. Compre- 
hensive news reporting, 
tasteful music, sports, farm 
information and variety 
give KTRH the popular bal- 
anced programming that 
benefits over four million 
people. 



-CBS- 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Vol. 14, No. 16 • 16 APRIL 1960 



^ SPONSOF 

fr, THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS Ot 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The media analyst: new Mr. Big 

29 A new power in media buying decisions is rising in agencies; it's! 
media analysis group, which guides everything from plans to -tation ! 

Tv council to judge commercials 

32 Fifty distinguished admen, representing agencies and advert: 

named as judges of the May commercials festival to be held in New * 

Puritan's tv drive wins dealers, dads 

34 Menswear manufacturer tested tv in .New York and doubled sales: 

ready for new Father's Day push with expanded schedule in N.Y. and I 

If you think you've got it tough . . . 

36 Here"s a heart-warming, heart-rending saga of life at a Class IV i 
station in Pampa. Tex., which puts Madison Ave. to shame as Ulcer (4 

Who's who in cigarettes? 

38 SPONSOR reports on key ad people at the top six cigarette companie-. 
their agencies, in a brand and packaging rundown for easy refti 

White Rose fights off the big boys 

4X Seeman Bros, tea brand gets in licks via spot radio with a shrewd c( 
nation of saturation and holding action in the New York metropolitan 

New tv data for buyers 

42 Two syndicated services — TPI and Sindlinger— added to five now { 
able bring additional qualitative facts on audiences to network 



FEATURES 

56 Film-Scope 

24 49th & Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-Up 

16 Timehuyers at Work 

72 Seller's Viewpoint 

46 Sponsor \-k- 



12 Sponsor Backstage 

58 Sponsor Hears 

1 9 Sponsor-Scope 

74 Sponsor Speaks 

26 Spot Buys 

74 Ten-Second Spots 

70 Tv and Radio New- 

48 Tv Results 

55 Washington Week 



EUa 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulate 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: * 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmil 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 1 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimci 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries!* 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. a~^ 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 1 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md 



^1960 Sponsor Publications Inc 



16 APRIL tt 



1 



e n , 



>*/,* 



Wiser t h ad ^ 



*s; n{ 



} ° cf „. 



' ar s bound to succeed'? And ^° e ° * 



.^oo' 



P^ 6 



bo^ 1 



l0 ^ 



a^ s 



^e ; 



*rt& 



i ^\ oi 



,bser^ e T 



, fo\^°9 



tecte' 



re ar « advertisers « h ^ ^^ /f V ou look at the hlstor y of a*^ 9 " V °° a , tne re sults can be 

- ^ s/ackened Qr ^^^^ the . ^^ (somet|mes at c ,, cal time s) and 

1 I the forgotten trademarks of the past. On the other hand, there are advertisers who mounted massive adverting 
paigns-costing many millions of dollars -who have failed to increase their sales. The question of the advertising 
'opnation should always be preceded by these questions: Do I have an idea which will sell my product 9 Has my 
icy been thorough enough to arrive at a sound selling strategy, and ingenious enough to express it in an arresting 
interesting way? If the answers to these questions are "yes.' advertising tonnage can be regarded as an invest- 
t, instead of an expense Everything depends on the idea. Ideas sell products because— people buy ideas 

YOUNG & RUBICAM ■ ADVERTISING 



•NSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



(WKOW-TV 

| MADISON'S 

| Qction 

| BUY FOR: 

|dx sunray oil 

Ranking FIRST in the nation 
in per family gasoline sales, 
Madison is a "must" mar- 
ket for DX promotion. Total 
gasoline sales in 8 county 
merchandisable zone — over 
$18,000,000. 

| OSCAR MAYER 

Dealer calls, merchandising 
letters, and window displays. 
These merchandising assists, 
added to heavy frequency on 
WKOW-TV, have kept Oscar 
Mayer fine meat products 
moving in Wisconsin's fast- 
est growing market. 

| LESTAIR 

Heavy frequency on WKOW- 
TV, Madison's lowest CPM 
station has helped introduce 
this new Aden's Lestair to 
happy housewives in WKOW- 
TV's 142,000 southern Wis- 
consin homes. 



if ACTION is 

|| your aim in Madison call Gen. Mgr. 
|| Ben Hovel or Headley-Reed. 




WKOW 



tv a 

in MADISON, WIS. 



NEWSMAKE 
of the week 



Two hundred years ago, Pierre Lorillard founded the wo, 
first tobacco company in New York after escaping reli$ 
persecution in France. Last week in the same city, L 
Gruber, board chairman of P. Lorillard Co., cut a 350'pc 
cake, served it to 700 stockholders and talked to them a 
tv find advertising in the competitive world of cigare 

The newsmaker: Lewis Gruber is board chairman 
chief executive officer of the world's oldest tobacco company, 
has been manufacturing and marketing products since 1760, 
directs an international concern which employs 7,000 persorj 
owned by 32,000 shareholders, distributes Lorillard products thr 
6,000 wholesalers and one and one-half million retailers. Fo! 
first nine months of '59, business volume was up 5.6%. 

Major products are five ciga- 
rette brands: Kent, Old Gold, New- 
port, Spring and Embassy, all with 
advertising programs directed by 
the Lennen & Newell agency in 
New York and supervised by the 
company's ad director, Daniel 
Ladd, and the brand advertising 
manager, George Whitmore. 

Board Chairman Gruber, in 
speaking to stockholders, pointed 
out that advertising is a "must" 
and that air media have unique 
advantages over print. 

"The cost of being competitive with leading positioned brar 
high," he said, "and the number of dollars spent on brand bui 
is awesome. But when a manufacturer is dependent on the ; 
ated use of his products, there is no satisfactory alternative." 

He sees a changing advertising picture: More advertisers ar 
ping their exploitation budgets, "which will one day pose a se 
problem from the standpoint of clear product exposure." Mr. G 
commented that blue-chip companies are using more space and ; 
ing increasingly sizable schedules for tv and radio. There's a pr< 
inherent in this pattern, however: "While print media can add f 
the additional volume could lessen advertising impact. But adv 
ing involving air time can go no farther than the clock permits 

What does he think of television advertising? "It's a medi'J 
fads and fancies, ruled by audience influence and questionable 
ings. We avoid making long-term commitments in order to 2 
against being caught in an ebb tide of waning talent and pro 
popularity." But he reminded his stockholders that "High : 
are not necessarily indicative of magic selling ability." 




16 APRIL ' 



1ARK TWAIN 

)uld have been'TheBoss Man" of WPTR 



puld have fit him like a glove because Mark Twain 
esented GRASS ROOTS THINKING AT ITS 
T. Radio, too, should be communication at its best, 
's the kind of a station we try to run at WPTR. 
irally we play music but we believe news is more 
>rtant — and equally important is the interpretation 
lat news. 

's why WPTR has a minimum of 48 regular sched- 
fli i newscasts every day — commentary on the news at 
j[ 12 times a day — news in depth every hour — and 
•e necessary "editorials" are broadcast on a round the 
: basis. WPTR has never backed down from an issue 
It was right. It's that kind of an independent — 



independent! In another area, too, it's unique. Last year 
WPTR received the "National Headline Club Award'' 
for outstanding public service. 

Perhaps it's why WPTR has more local advertising than 
the next 3 stations combined; more total advertising 
than the next 2 stations in the market put together. 

50,000 
Leople J. -M.^%. PEOPLE WATTS 

ALBANY, TROY, SCHENECTADY 

The Dominant Station in the market according to Pulse. 
Right up there with Hooper, too. Represented nationally 
by Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. 




NCAN MOUNSEY EXEC. V. P. OF WPTR 
A division of SCHINE ENTERPRISES 



•SOR • 16 APRIL 1960 




Amalgamated Trj st & Savings Kaxk S^ 

( .«,< ,<«, WWII*/ fLtfl^Mo. 



ty iftfluST 



The check came in a letter saying: "I send it to you 
because I thought your coverage of Squaw Valley 
was superb. And I understand it cost you a pretty 
penny over and above any advertising income." 

The letter was one of literally thousands reflect- 
ing the excitement and appreciation felt by 80 
million Americans who watched the series of 14 
programs on the CBS Television Network covering 
the 1960 Winter Olympic Games. 

They came from all elements of the population— 
from some of the highest ranking government offi- 
cials, one of whom described the broadcasts as "a 
spectacular job of detailed coverage"*- as well as 
from farmers, teenagers, businessmen, and house- 
wives. A Midwestern newspaper published an edi- 
torial headed "CBS deserves a gold medal." 

It goes without saying that this remarkable surge 
of enthusiasm was especially gratifying to the real 
sponsorof the series— Renault. Inc. —which was able 
to demonstrate the quality of its automobiles to 
tremendous daily audiences. During the average 
minute that the 14 broadcasts were on the air they 
commanded the undivided attention of 20 million 
viewers. More people watched these broadcasts than 
the combined viewers of all other programs on the 
air at the same time. 

Naturally this overwhelming response pleased us. 
too. since it set the stage for our exclusive coverage 
of the Summer Olympics next August and Septem- 
ber against the magnificent backdrop of Rome. (For 
18 consecutive days, in a series of 29 broadcasts, 
you will see the world's foremost athletes compet- 
ing in the historic Marathon and Pentathlon events. 
as well as in 32 other sports contests ranging from 
boxing to yachting. ) It set the stage, too. for an ad- 
vertiser to write a check making him a sponsor. In 
fact, we're expecting it. 

CBS TELEVISION NETWORK 



A MOST 

UNEXPECTED 

SPONSOR 




FOR A MOST 

SPECTACULAR 

PROGRAM!] 



- 



erne 



THE 



SHAPE 



OF 



THINGS 



TO COME ! 




See pages 44 and 45 







PROVIDENCE 



\ jSp/" 




/ 



<£^ 



THE TWO BILLION DOLLAR SOUTHEASTERN NEW ENGLAND MARKET 

No newspaper — no other radio station anywhere — effectively sells 450,000 
homes in this contiguous market area. Ask your Blair man for both quantitative 
nmi :.; itative Pulse studies, proving WPRO's 8-county dominance. 



W P R O 



PROVIDENCE 



CAPITAL CITIES BROADCASTING CORP. 



18 



SPONSOF 



Norman R. Glenn 
Secratary-Treaturar 

Elaine Couper Glenn 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 



Senior Editor* 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Mibch 

Midwest Editor Chicago) 



Film Editori 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Jack Lindrup 

Gloria F. Pilot 

Ben Ssff 

Lloyd Kaplan 

.'. a fer z . Scanlon 

Contributing Editor 



Art Editor 

Maury Kurht 



Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

Helena Etelson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Braider 
Eastern Office 
Bernard Piatt 
Willard Dougherty 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Western Manager 
George Dietrich 



CIRCULATION DEPARTMEN; 

Allen M. Greenberg, Manager 
Bill Oefelein 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publish 
Laura Oken, Accounting Manage 
George Becker: Anne Marie Cooper 
Michael Crocco: Syd Guttman; 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Flora Tomade l| 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 



One of the 

world's greatest 

house-to-house 

salesmen 



(sometimes) 




He can make as many as 18,000,000 calls a 
linute, and get inside the house every time. But 
/hat happens then? Does he get the order, or just 
5ll a few jokes and leave? 

The answer is important, because this salesman 
ioesn't work on a commission basis; he gets paid, 



and paid plenty, whether he makes the sale or not. 
At N. W. Ayer & Son we've learned a lot about 
how to make this gifted but hard-to-handle fellow 
really go to work. When he does, he proves to 
be one of the greatest house-to-house salesmen 
in the world. N. W. AYER & SON, INC. 



[p 



The commercial is the payoff 



PONSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



LONG ISLAND IS A MAJOR MARKET! 



by Joe Csi 





THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND 



THE GREATER 

LONG ISLAND MARKET 

(Nassau-Suffolk) 



REACHES 
MORE BUYING 
INCOME THAN 

DALLAS 



DENVER & DAYTON 



PUT TOGETHER! 



$4,714,210,000 



WHLI 

Dominates the Major Long Island Market (Nassau) 

. . . Delivers MORE Audience than any other 

Network or Independent Station! 

(Pulse) 



>1 0,000 WATTS 

WHLI 



HEMPSTEAD 

IONC ISIANO. N T. 





Old friends at the convention 

The 38th annual convention of the Natic 
Association of Broadcasters wasn't nearly as 
grim as I dreaded it would be. As a matter of 
fact, somewhat to m\ surprise. I discovered that 
I found more about this get-together that was 
truly heart-warming and touching than at any 
the many previous broadcaster meetings I'd at- 
tended. I have been trying to analvze why this 
was so. and find it extremely difficult. 

Maybe it was because of the virtually perfect tribute to Hal Fa 
lows delivered bv Frank Stanton on the opening morning. I sav th 
speech was virtually perfect because it was brief and yet did not fa 
to enumerate a single one of Hals long list of talents as a huma 
being and one of the finest, most tireless spokesmen am industr 
ever had. It was sentimental but not the least bit maudlin. And t 
CBS president delivered it with a sincerity and dignity — and yet 
warmness — that seemed to express precisely how everyone who kne 
Hal Fellows felt about him. 

I was quite moved, too. by the standing and prolonged ovatio 
given Clair McCollough, as he was escorted down the aisle of tli 
vast grand ballroom of the Conrad Hilton by his fellow broadcaster 
Since the dav I met Clair in August of 1945 I have made no seen 
of the fact that I love him. He is one of my all-time favorite peopli 
Down through these 15 years he has been one of the busiest of ; 
broadcasting executives. I don't know of a single period in 
decade and a half when Clair hasn't been doing two or three majl 
industry jobs, officially on the record, or quietly behind the scem-i 
At the same time he has directed the solid growth of the Steinmi 
communications empire, and made their radio and television pro! 
erties models for the industry. And there has hardly been a publj 
service activity of any consequence in his native Lancaster, or tlj 
state of Pennsylvania for that matter, to which Clair has not ma<| 
a contribution. With all this. he. his wife, and daughter represeJ 
one of the most wholesome, happy, well-knit family units it has evl 
been my pleasure to meet. And, incredible as it may seem. I ha J 
never, in this same period, seen Clair too busy to help a friend £| 
some chore done, no matter how trivial. 

McCollough 's touching thanks 

It was typical of Clair, too, that at the end of his keynote addrt-l 
the morning the convention opened, he said that he, his wife, hi 
daughter and all his associates in the Steinman organization thank.* 
his broadcasting colleagues from the bottom of their hearts for til 
Distinguished Sen ice Award which the NAB had just bestow J 
upon Clair. Clair truly does not think of himself as an individual 
but rather as a part of the little family in whose behalf he ga^ 
thanks, and part of the larger family of broadcasters the world ov 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 19( 










STRONGER THAN EVER! 



r-t 


TER 3 YEARS, POPEYE STRENGTHENS 
TINGS COAST-TO -COAST 

March '57 February '60 


NS-TV 


COLUMBUS, OHIO 


13.9 


19.1 


RO-TV 


PROVIDENCE, R.I. 


19.5 


24.9 


iD-TV 


SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 


15.5 


18.4 


BT-TV 


SOUTH BEND, IND. 


14.9 


17.4 


:m-tv 


SPOKANE, WASH. 


18.7 


19.7 


U-TV 


SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 


10.7 


13.4 


>H-TV 


SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 


10.6 


13.9 


IX 


NEW YORK, N. Y. 


14.9 


14.3 


, 


! A 


LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


12.0 


11.5 


,i» 


JCH-TV 


BUFFALO, N.Y. 


14.4 


14.3 




1 

Iter 

EIN 

eperio 
ver 15. 


3 YEARS, POWEF 
137 MARKETS - 

d or competition— gives P 


tFUL ARE 

regardless 
opeye a muse 


* AVER- 

?/ station, 
ular rating 



AFTER 3 YEARS, TEXAS BUILDS 
RATINGS ...with Bugs Bunny, Porkey Pig, 
Tweety, Sylvester and all the other favorite 
Warner Brothers Cartoons. These fabulous char- 
acters have lifted their full-hour rating from a 
robust 17.3 to a lusty 22.9 on KDUB-TV in Lub- 
bock ... almost 50% higher than three years ago. 

Want to put muscles in your ratings? Then feed 
your audience a steady diet of U.a.a.'s Popeye 
and Warner Brothers Cartoons! For each year — 
more and more children reach the age group that 
begins to enjoy these popular cartoon characters. 
Add them to the millions of already devoted viewers 
of all ages, and you are virtually guaranteed 
stronger ratings for years to come. 



WRITE- WIRE- PHONE 

U.CJ.CJ. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 



New York. 247 Park Ave MUrray Hill 7-7800 
Chicago. 75 E Wacker Drive. DEarborn 2-2030 
Dallas. I5i1 Bryan Street. Riverside 7-8553 
Los Angeles. 400 S Beverly Dr.. CRestview 6-5886 




While serving a single 
station market, WTHI-TV 
fulfills its public service re- 
sponsibilities in a way that 
has gained for it the appre- 
ciation and support of its 
entire viewing area ... a cir- 
cumstance that must be re- 
flected in audience response 
to advertising carried. 

Five full % hours of local 
public service program- 
ming each week. 



CHANNEL 10 CBS • ABC 

TERRE HAUTE 



WHBF 



RADIO and TELEVISION 




^ Sponsor backstage (continued) 



There was just the hint of a sob in Clair's voice as he closed his 
speech, and I don't mind saying there was a lump in my throat, too. 
I hi-, in my book, is a man! 

Clair talked at some length about the upcoming younger men in, 1 
the broadcasting business and their responsibilities to themselves and 
the industry. One of the finest of these, in my opinion, is young Ted 
Bergman, who at the moment is president of the Parkson Advertis- 
ing Agency. 

I don't really know how old Teddy is, but I would guess thei 
middle 30's. For a stretch, of course, he was president of the Du. 
mont Television Network, and did a fine job in this spot under less 
than ideal circumstances. Ted is one of those young men, who 
knows and loves the broadcasting business, and is dedicated to it| 
He has the capacity, as have broadcasting's older leaders, to do the 
most effective job commercially and yet constantly make meaningful 
contributions to raising the industry's standards in every area. 

While I consider him one of the most able advertising executives 
practicing today, I would still prefer to see him back in the heart o| 
the broadcasting business itself. And whether in advertising or 
broadcasting directly I hope the industry will find increasing oppor-i 
tunities to permit Ted to be of service. 

Having the opportunity to spend a little time with Ted Bergmai 
again, I think, was another reason why I liked this 38th annuaj 
broadcaster meet. And yet one of the sessions I enjoyed most wa$ 
an ail-too brief one with an old friend, who is a truly veteran broad-| 
caster. He is, as a matter of fact, one of the very few men who wad 
attending his 38th consecutive broadcaster convention. And yoi^ 
can't do too much better than 38 out of 38. 

Bill Hedges' experience in politics 

I'm speaking, course, about NBC's Bill Hedges. Bill was due tc* 
retire in January, but NBC asked him to stay on until July to takq 
charge of NBC's planning for the upcoming political conventions; 
In 1920, at the age of 25, Bill was a cub reporter on the Chicagi 
Daily News, and in that year covered his very first political conven 
tion for the paper. He scored a clean beat on the story that a darl 
horse by the name of Warren G. Harding had won the Republican 
nomination. 

The paper subsequently had him cover the Democratic Conven 
tion. which nominated James Cox, and the election in which Hardin 
took Cox by an almost 7,000,000 popular vote and a 277 elector; 
vote margin. Bill did such a fine job covering these major politi 
cal events that the paper put him in charge of its Political Bureai 
Bill's thinking of writing a tale or two when he retires in July, an 
I know he'll have much of interest and value to say. 

Maybe Bill's good, useful career made me feel there was somethin] 
special about this convention. Or maybe it was the news (to me 
that Colonel Harry WHder had gotten married. "I was shot witl 
luck to get her," the wonderful, old Colonel wrote us about h 
new bride. 

Or maybe it was a little of all of these things, plus the fact that ; 
this hour of the industry's greatest need more broadcasters turned u 
in Chicago, and worked more determinedly than I have ever seei 
them work to make broadcasting a better business and a greate] 
service to the nation. W 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 19f fl 




/%£a& 



THE X-15 IS THE 

PACESETTER 

IN JET TRAVEL. 

It is designed to fly at more than 4,000 
miles an hour more than 100 miles 
above the earth. 



IS CINCINNATI'S 



PACESETTER 

RADIO STATION 

WSAI is the first radio station in America 
to "review" the newspapers. Six times 
daily, WSAI comments on both local papers, 
offering brickbats and bouquets. No single 
feature has ever stirred up greater inter- 
est. In Programming ... in Popularity . . . 
in Productivity, WSAI is Cincinnati's 
PACESETTER radio station. 



Represented Nationally by GILL- PERN A New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 
THE CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS WSM-Cincinnati; ViPEH-Philadelphia; WALT- Tampa 



• 16 APRIL 1960 



IF YOU WANT TO 
OWN KANSAS 
YOU MUST USE 

WIBW 



FROM Topeka on out to the ends of 
Kansas, (and parts of Missouri, 
Oklahoma and Nehraska) WIBW 
delivers full value for every adver- 
tising dollar: 

In Topeka Metropolitan 
Area, a whopping 69"x of 
the total radio families 
tune to WIBW every week! In the 
primary national advertising period 
—AM Mon.-Fri., WIBW leads all 
competitors with an average share 
of 33%. 



¥Wl 


1 In the 11-county 


Topek 


S M 


1 Trade Area, WIBW hi 


■U 


■ more than 2 to 1 


listener 




1 ship: 






Weekly Daytime Circulation 


Penetratio 


WIBW 


64,730 Radio Families 


74.3% 


Sta. "A" 


29,850 Radio Families 


34.2% 


Sta. "B" 


18,900 Radio Families 


21.6% 


Sta. "C" 


13,740 Radio Families 


15.7% 



In 27 rich agricultural 
counties, including the To- 

peka Market, surveyed by 

Pulse.^WIBW is first of 52 stations 
in 190 of 260 rated quarter hours. 

||T7H The Nielsen Coverage 
Lf fj 1 Study #2 credits WIBW 

B^^^fl with 94 counties in Kansas. 
Missouri, and Nebraska — a total of 
458,990 radio families. 41% weekly 
penetration — a circulation of 184,410 
different radio families every week! 

WIBW broadcasts in an area of 
excellent ground conductivity at 
5,000 watts at 580 kc— the lowest 
frequency in the region — 5th low- 
est in the country! Balanced pro- 
gramming serves both farm and 
urban audiences — full merchan- 
dising services available. 

WIBW costs more — but it will win 
more Kansas sales than any other 
station in the state! 

Investigate! 



580 Kc. 



Kansas 

CBS 5,000 W. 



Thad M. Sandstrom, Gen. Mgr. 

Represented fay Avery-Knodel. Inc. 






Timebuyers 
at work 




Larry Bershon, McCann-Erickson Advertising USA, New York, feels! 
that many advertisers would continue spot tv through the summer 
if rates were more feasible. "I don't see how stations can continue 
to ignore the advertising facts of life, now that all the networks are> 
giving summer discounts," Larry says. "Last year advertisers re- 
duced by over 25 million dollars 
their expenditures in tv from the 
spring to summer quarters. Cer- 
tainly cost was a major factor. 
With time spent viewing tv off 
30% from the height of mid-win- 
ter to summer, it becomes less of 
an economical buy. Print sales- 
men have had a valid argument 
for years — 'Print circulation 
doesn't fluctuate, why pay the 
same price for reduced circulation 
in tv?' Tv rates in keeping with 
its circulation is tv's only answer." Larry points out that a fewj 
stations are giving discounts — one offers savings of as high as 20/ 
in prime time from spring to summer — and some others are consid 
ering reductions. "But many are ignoring the situation and if mid- 
June sends their sales forces for aspirin, it's self-imposed misery, 

Jeff Fine, DCSS, New York, feels that it is more important than 
ever for effective selling that buyers make sure program mood and 
content fit the commercial. "A much higher percentage of viewers 
than realized is critical of commercials, but I think that the criticism 
is not so much because of the commercials themselves as that they 
are badly placed. The loudest kind 
of hard-sell commercial will hav 
high receptivity if it's harmonious 
with the show." Jeff points oul 
that while buyers seldom place i 
commercial in a program or time 
slot not consistent with the prod 
uct, there are many instances where 
the character of the commercia 
conflicts severely with the program 
Sometimes it is copy and commei 
cial delivery, other times sound 
and musical effects. "Whatever tl; 
case, the effect is negative. True, a negative effect is sometimes bettt 
remembered, but I doubt that it often sells. In many instances, 
course, it's impossible for the buyer to know the commercial, bi 
when available, he should get the information. Good buying is n 
just a mechanical process, but the careful weighing of all factoi 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 19( (j 




FARM GALS EYE NEW PASTURES! 

But they've been warned, By^Eeir Mothers, 
to stay off Madison Avenue! ^** << -^*. 

Seriously, this picture is merely to show that 
our farm families of today, here in the Land 
of Milk and Money, look and act just like 
their City Cousins . . . except the farmer, 
of course, has more money. 
Eye our market: 42% rural and 58% urban 
. . . more than 1,350,000 folks spending 
$1,750,000,000 in retail sales yearly . . . 
over 400,000 families enjoying Channel 
2-CBS Television. 

es a pretty picture, doesn't it? 







aga 





FOND DU LAC 



SHEBOYGAN 



WEST BEND 




THE LAND 
OF MILK 
ANDfONEY 
WBAY ch. 2 
GREEN BA 



: 



,1'ONSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



WPIX-11 carries more minute advertising from 
the top 25 national spot advertisers than any 
other New York television station.* ■ Leading 
advertisers select wpix-11 for the "network 
look" of its programming, its Nielsen 
proved quality audience and the guar- 
anteed good company of other national 
advertisers. Your product message 
will never appear with "mail order" or 



•Broadcast Advert - 




over-long commercials -because wpix-11 does rtt 
accept this kind of advertising ■ Only wrix-f 
of all seven New York TV stations, offers you : 
many opportunities to place minute commf 
cials in such a productive selling atmc- 
phere during the prime nighttime houj 



r 60-second comn 



"WIFE 



new | 
york\ 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 



Most significant to and rmdio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



16 APRIL i960 Judging from opinions obtained this week by SPONSOR-SCOPE in a quick 

ctw-nht i960 check among top agency planners, the rank and file of advertisers aren't going 

sponsor to be hesitant about making their commitments for the 1960-61 season in the im- 

pub li cations inc. mediate future. 

The marketing of goods hasn't been as rosy as had been expected but the level and 
outlook are firm enough to give the advertiser confidence to proceed with his media 
plans. 

There's a good prospect that Campbell Soup (BBDO) will expand — for the 
first time — in its spot buying into tv for the coming season, which would mean at 
least another $1 million on the spot barrelhead. 

In the offing also is another fall-winter run for spot radio. 



Soaps and toiletries highlighted the national spot tv buying activity this week. 

Among those that either bought or asked for availabilities : 

Cheer (Y&R) ; Tide (B&B) ; Drene (Compton) ; Carter's Pills and Arrid Whirlin 
(Bates); Food Manufacturers I Bates I ; Jax Beer (DCS&S) ; Maytag (Burnett); S. C. 
Johnson's Raid (FCB) ; Dr. West toothpaste (KM&J). 

Incidentally, Mr. Clean (Tatham-Laird) has cut back about 12 tv markets. 



Not even the colossal General Foods is too pridef ul to lift an air media leaf from 
the strategy book of a small competitor like Folger Coffee. 

It was just about a year ago that Folger set the coffee trade on its ears in Chicago 
with a radio blitz of unprecedented dimensions. 

GF has unloosened a similar blitz, but in tv, in behalf of its Yuban Instant. Practically 
all the New York stations are in the act, with the schedules running anywhere from 30 to 
50 spots a week and no termination date given. 

There's also heavy sampling, particularly in the suburbs. 



For a measure of how the tv networks are faring in spreadeagling their control 
over fall programing, note the number of outside packages they've already accepted : 

ABC TV: Bristol-Myers' Peter Gunn and P&G's The Law and Mr. Jones. 

CBS TV: General Foods' Andy Griffith Show and Angel and Bristol-Myers' Candid 
Camera. (The Garry Moore show has been using Candid Camera) . 

NBC TV: P&G's Peter Loves Mary, and Ford's Alfred Hitchcock series. 

P.S.: Several agencies reported this week that leading film packagers were refusing to 
screen their new product to anyone but those who had a network-approved time period. 



There's a difference of as much as $6,000 in the commercial minute prices be- 
ing asked by NBC TV for its 7:30-8:30 p.m. action shows. 

The contrast: Laramie and Bonanza, in 20 minute segments, $72,000, or S36,000 
per commercial minute; Riverboat, $30,000 per commercial minute. Each figure 
represents time and program. 







• 16 APRIL I960 



19 



1 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Tv appears to be making some headway against the summer hiatus, at least * 
spot. 

Compare the gross billings for the third quarter of last year with the average billings t 
the other three quarters and you'll find that the dropoff was but 17%. 

In terms of dollars: the first, second and fourth quarters averaged $160,00( 
whereas the gross for the third quarter came to $113,500. 

How it will advance the cause of tv is somewhat problematical but there's a I 
of marketing significance in the induction to the giant automotive directorates 
such package goods kingpins as Charles Mortimer and Neil McElroy. 

The election of Mortimer to the Ford board and McElroy to the Chrysler boa) 
came on the heels of the recruitment of Scott Paper's Thomas B. McCabe for the G 
board. 

This crossroughing is interpreted on Madison Avenue as reflecting two things in partic 
lar, as far as the auto industry is concerned: 

1) A shift in marketing emphasis from the monolith concept that the cm 
pany itself came first in importance to letting every brand (or make) stand on its oi 
in advertising and promotion. 

2) The production men (or engineers) have taken a back seat to the mark 
ers. In this sharp swing of the pendulum advertising, promotion and selling becomes a dot 
ly inherent part of management and planning. 

Necco is about to cut loose on a new candy brand, Carma. 

The account's new agency, K&E, has recommended 8-second I.D.'s. 

Agencymen think that stations are passing up a cogent argument when tK 
fail to emphasize the number of spots they can buy for the price of a full page 
in a local newspaper. 

If stations, say these agency people, think that retailers, or even regional advertisers, 
fully aware of this, they're much mistaken. Tkeir point: the newspaper-oriented adverj 
er should be approached from the viewpoint of unit comparison: that for the cj 
of a page he can get, say 10 tv spots or 20 minute commercials in radio. 

If national spot billings this fall don't maintain the current year's pace, J 
can expect, say influential reps, the tv network affiliates to raise a row over 
mushrooming of spot carriers. 

The showdown when it comes, predict these reps, can't help but have serious politi 
repercussions. 

By the way, the final 1959 tv gross time figures of network vs. spot ($627 
lion as against $605 million) sort of disappointed the spot faction. The early II 
quarters showed spot ahead of network billings. 

You'll probably see before the year is out a radical reshuffling of sales rn 
among the leading cigarette brands. 

Expected to be hit hardest, of course, are those that have harnessed their adverl 
ing most to health claims. The gainers: the talkers about flavor, taste and satisfactn 

You can also expect lots of filter changes. It's already happened to the Duke. 

Bristol-Myers will have four commercial minutes riding on ABC TV this fall 

It breaks down weekly this way: 1*4 minutes in Peter Gunn; a minute in I 
City, a minute in the Roaring 20's and an alternate minute in Cheyenne. 

The agency on the participations is Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, and the network's s 
brass emphatically refutes competitive hints about a "sweetener" in the deal. 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL ] 



7 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Pharmaceuticals (Parkson) was still shopping around this week for a network 
home for its Tightrope series come the fall. 

NBC TV had offered the Tuesday 9-9:30 p.m. period, with American Tobacco as an 
alternate sponsor, but the drug account after weighing the competition as against the 
weekly time and talent bill ($115,000) passed up the spot. 

Incidentally, Pharmaceuticals put in a bid for the alternate week of Lawrence Welk 
(ABC) ^-costing around $125,000, time and talent — but Dodge, the major spon- 
sor, wouldn't go along with the proposal. 

NBC TV is offering for the second summer a special price on three daytime 
series. 

It's 26 quarter hours of Dough Re Mi, Dr. Malone and From These Roots over 13 
weeks on a scatter plan at $2,200 a week. 

The other statistics: 78 commercial minutes, a 32% unduplicated audience, or a 
third of all homes, over four weeks; 90% coverage and $1.06 CPMHPCM. 

Even though the schedules at CBS TV and NBC TV are still quite fluid, it's 
possible to get a pretty good idea of how the nighttime program categories will 
shape up for the networks this fall. 

From the viewpoint of program types, there's no escaping this general impression: (1) 
both CBS and ABC TV have gone all out to convey the concept of balanced pro- 
graming; (2) CBS will be able to call itself the "happy" network: it'll be loaded for 
bear with comedy and light drama. 

Here's a comparative type sum-up, based on shows set and tentatively scheduled: 

CATEGORY ABC TV CBS TV NBC TV TOTAL 

Westerns 6 5 9 20 

Situation Comedy 9 14 4 27 

Crime-Mystery 7 1 5 13 

Adventure 6 4 4 14 

Comedy Variety 3 1 4 

Straight Variety 12 3 

Drama anthology 2 3 3 8 

Audience partici. 2 3 5 

Musical 2 13 

Documentary 2 2 1 5 

Sports 10 1 

Total 35 35 33 103 
Footnote: So far no new live series has been scheduled. 

ABC TV is returning Tuesday 10:30-11 p.m. to its affiliates as an exchange for 
the same night's 7-7 :30 period, which Ralston has bought for Expedition. 

The affiliates will have to program for themselves the Expedition spot every third week. 
It poses an odd arrangement for syndication purposes. 

The switch of that $2.8 million worth of General Mills daytime business from 
CBS TV to NBC TV suggests a case of love-me-love-my-dog. 

To get the Mills business NBC had to agree to schedule (Saturday 11:30 a.m.) 
the hoary Lone Ranger (now in its seventh or eighth run). 

It's become virtually a ritual in Minneapolis for the advertiser to ask, while a network 
deal is under discussion, "And now what can you do for the Lone Ranger?" 

The reasons why General Mills has sought to squeeze all the mileage it can out of the 
Ranger: (1) it's so closely identified with Cheerios; (2) there's a new generation for 
the series every three years. 






K)R • 16 APRIL 1960 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Those 15 BBDO branch offices — so the consensus is on Madison Avenue— mf 
have had a lot to do with Pepsi-Cola choice of that agency over at least 10 coil 
petitors for the account, estimated anywhere from S13 to $17 million. 

Commonly cited as an interesting contrast: Ted Bates, considered the most profitall 
agency in the U.S.. has but one branch office, Hollywood. 

In terms of casualty rate, the 1959-60 tv network programing season turi 
out to be the worst yet. 

Here's an updating of the turnover as compared to other seasons 

1959-60 
Total number of program entries 119 

Total shows dropped 49 

Casualty rate for all sponsored shows 41% 

Total new shows started since the fall 47 

Total newcomers dropped 29 

Casualty rate for new shows 61% 

The Tea Council embarks on its summer iced tea campaign in spot radio 
June, with the schedule running seven days a week between 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. 

Twelve of the 29 markets — same as used last year — will have a minimum of 100 spol 
a week and the other 17 markets, a minimum of 15 spots a week. 

TvB's disclosure last week that 59 advertisers used network tv for the nrj 
time in 1959 suggests an interesting sidelight. 

The gross billings for the 59 added up to $11,444,170, which figures 1.7% of 
§627,312,000 reported by the same source for all network gross billings in 'Sj 

Amoco (Katz) is coming back to spot radio, the money deriving from the l 
finer's rejuggling of its syndication commitments. 

The number of radio markets won't be determined until Amoco sees (1) what can 1 
had in the way of film properties and (2) how the radio availabilities stack up. 

TvB last week out on a pitch to Montgomery Ward, showed how the medi 
could be used not only to stimulate sales but enhance the corporate image. 

In light of this presentation, these comparative expenditures in tv by Ward and its 
order-chainstore competitor, Sears Roebuck, should be interesting: 

advertiser 1959 1958 

Sears* $947,720 $765,830 

Montgomery Ward 595,890 662,230 

*Does not include AllState billings. 

Since the product makes heavy use of spot tv, these marketing observations aboi 
margarine may have timely relevance: 

• Looks like the market as a whole has reached its plateau and that added sales 
have to depend to a major degree on population growth. 

• The average housewife buys two pounds a week and the task of continuing 
tising is to make sure that this level is maintained. 

• The sale advantages of the premium spreads is beginning to level off. 

• The butter interests can be expected to contest margarine brand claims 
greater intensitv from here on out via government aaencies. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page j 
Spot Buys, page 26; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; spons^ 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 70; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

22 SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 19"i 




K KPRC.WHAT'S SO SPECIAL ABOUT YOUR TV? 

"\ sorts of things. Mainly, the friendly things that happen on the KPRC-TV screen. 

[I NDLY? And then some! Everybody in the KPRC-TV family knows just how to mak 
^vision fun for you. Unexpected little pleasures pop up all along the way. Real color 
t tation breaks. Your own personal merchandising. Many other welcome touches. 

p T FAST? RESULTFUL? Well, KPRC-TV cruises at a little more than 18 hours every 
f . And every hour produces high-flying sales. Availabilities free, too. And 
Ijal participation announcements custom-contoured. 

A :N CAN I GO? Anytime. Make reservations now and— Whoosh! Go! On the y 
I RC-TV Ch. 2. See your Edward Petry man (professionals plan better 
res trips) or contact KPRC-TV, Royal Houston, Texas Television. 

|Jl|TE OF A HALF A MILLION HOMES IN HARRIS, REFUGIO, ARANSAS, MATAGORDA, GALVESTON, CHAMBERS, JEFFERSON, ORANGE, HARDIN, LIBERTY, PORT BEND, 
HON, JACKSON, VICTORIA, GOLIAD, DE WITT, LAVACA, COLORADO, AUSTIN, WALLER, MONTGOMERY, SAN JACINTO, POLK, ANGELINA, TYLER, JASPER, SABINE, 
J.XUGUSTINE, TRINITY, WALKER, GRIMES, WASHINGTON, FAYETTE, BASTROP, LEE, BURLESON, BRAZOS, MADISON, HOUSTON, NACOGDOCHES, MILAM, ROBERTSON, 
| ANDERSON AND FREESTONE COUNTIES. 




i)NSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 




oman's'7I^«Qg7hJ^^Dpportant to Tidewater 
Ters, and Carol KrtoqM&W AVY-TV's Woman's 
Erector, is the exclamation mark on top of that 
viewpoint. Carol not only reports on women's 
activities in and around Tidewater and nationally, 
but is one of Tidewater Teleradio's most sought 
after commercial personalities. She has been the 
"voice" of The Bank of Virginia for almost three 
years, since the station went on the air. If it' 
I the female touch you want try Carol. 



49th s 

Madis 




Crossing the language bar 

Please accept our hearty congratj 
tions on your business prosper 
This firm is a subscriber to ' 
magazine SPONSOR, your publicat: 
However, only a few of our 
members can read it since Englnl 
a foreign language to us J< 
people belonging to the firm. 

We therefore came to think 
translating useful articles into Jajj 
ese so as to let a limited numbed 
our staff — officials and top employ 
only — read them. As for the quan 
of translations to be made, it wil 
only one or two articles per moi 
A total of 10 mimeographed co] 
will be produced for each translati 
with a note indicating the sourc 
"Translated from (the title of an a 
cle), sponsor, issuing date." 

In accordance with this purposl 
translation, the circulation of trl 
lated copies will be strictly linii 
within our firm. We assume thai 
execute this plan does not constit 
an infringement of the copyri 
that you hold. And the purpose| 
this letter is nothing but to ask 
your understanding on the matter 
advance. 

We would much appreciate if } 
realize difficulties which we are for 
to meet with in reading a fore 
language and if you kindly gi 1 
consent to our plan. 

Aki Yoshida 

dir., planning & research i 

Kyodo Adv. Co.. Ltd. 

Tokyo 

• SPONSOR is happy to grant permission! 



No Norman blood here 

I would like to take this opportunfej 
to saj that your recent "Cominfl 
cial Commentary" on Ban's teleview 
spots was one of the most enjoy. i 
tongue-in-cheek pieces I have ill 
for some time. It has been greaB 
appreciated by friends both in ajr: 



16 APRIL 1 » 



at of advertising. Just for the rec- 
rd, I'd say there isn't much evidence 
f Norman blood down here — maybe 
e're just a young country, and the 
por colonials lack Mr. Ogilvy's per- 
jption of the true value of ancient 
ivthological gods and idols. 
j Peter Hutton 

United Service Publicity 
Melbourne, Australia 

lore than appeared! 

ppreciate very much your using the 
icture on KFMB-TV's presentation 
f the print of Target, USA to the 
•epartment of the Navy. 

I want to point out, however, that 
le station produced as well as aired 
*ie documentary. 

Parker H. Jackson 

prom, dir., sis. dev. 

KFMB-TV 

San Diego 



rem, 



iongratulations to you — and to Dan 
Jydrick of WHG Radio, Norfolk, 
irginia, for the "Open Letter to 
Congressional Investigators," in your 
larch 26th issue. This impressed us 
h much that we used it on the air 
! couple of times, on our WLAG Edi- 
"yrial of the Air. Needless to say, we 
ave credit to SPONSOR, and to Dan 
Jydrick. True enough, we didn't get 
our permission in advance — but this 
5 one time we knew it wasn't nec- 
ssary. 

Faye Scarbrough 
program director 
WLAG 
LaGrange, Ga. 

■rear day! 

hat was a fine job you did with 
he Cordic and Taste Master bread 
ton in the 5 March issue. 

Rege and all of us at the station 
ertainly appreciate the article. 
J It was a good day all the way 
round — what with SPONSOR arriving 
iaturday morning and the strike of 
'ur talent being settled that night. 

Owen Simon 

KDKA 

Pittsburgh 



WHJR 

Jsf in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



erne 



THE 



SHAPE 



OF 



THINGS 



TO COME I 



/ 

I 



See pages 44 and 45 




16 APRIL 1960 



Where Can You Mak = Euch An 

"EXPANDINC MARKET 
BONANZA BUY?" 

KMSO-TV, Serving All Of 
WESTERN MONTANA is 

DIU in Coverage 



I in Programming 



BIG. 



Viewership 



9 OUt of every 10 TV Homes in the Far 
Western Montana market view only KMSO-TV. 

1,000 X 58 = 58,000 TV HOMES 

in 13 counties are delivered by KMSO-TV at a 
low cost thousand of just $1 

NOT JUST 1 BUT 6 CITIES 

Butte, Anaconda, Missoula, Deer Lodge, Ham- 
ilton, and Kalispell enjoy top programs on 



have been installed in 

Lodge, Kalispell and many other 

to rebroadcast KMSO-TV programs. 




WWL-TV live programming 
draws national attention! 

LOOK— Mar. 29, 1960— 'Wild Cargo' 
TV GUIDE— Nov. 21, 19S9— 

"Meet Morgus" 
AND a national news weekly article in 
Feb.. 1960, about Morgus, WWL-TVs 
DIFFERENT weatherman. 
The combined circulation of three 
great consumer magazines . . . 14% 
MILLION PEOPLE . . . have been 
exposed to articles about WW L-TV's 
outstanding local -hows during the 
pasl -ix months, WWL-TV's live pro- 
gram- are different . . . imaginative 
. . . NEWSWORTHY. 



Represented i 



mally by Km 



WWL-TV 



® 



NEW ORLEANS 



National and regional bui 
in work now or recently complete 



■x 

I 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Various schedules for PJ 
products start this month in the top markets. Cheer goes in for a 
weeks with day and night minutes. Marcia Roberts is the buyer i 
Young & Rubicam, New York. Zest schedules are set to run throug 
the P&G contract year using night minutes. Merrill Grant buv 
Benton & Bowles, New York. Also, through Compton Adv., HI 
York, additional schedules of day minutes are being run for Dune 
Hines cake mixes. Doug McMullen is the buyer. 
R. T. French Co., Atlantis Sales Corp. affiliate, Rochester: K 
promotion for French's instant mashed potatoes begins this month 
the top 40 markets. Schedules are mostly day minutes, run for i 
to seven weeks. Buyer: Mario Kircher. Agenc) : J. Walter Thomps 
Co., New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Stepping out of test areas wij 
schedules in about 25 markets for Spree. Nighttime minutes run fq 
52 weeks. Nick Imbernone buys at McCann-Erickson, New Y 
Also a number of new r markets are getting runs of day and ni 
minutes for Fab. Russ Barrv is the buver at Ted Bates & Co., N 
York. 

Readers Digest Association, Inc., Pleasantville, N. Y. : Usinj 
and night I.D.'s in about 85 markets in a circulation drive for tlj 
May issue similar to last month's. Frequencies range from 10 
24 spots per week per market. Buyer: Mario Kircher. Agency: 
Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

The Cracker Jack Co., Chicago: Its popcorn candy gets a rajal 
tv push this month for the first time in about 40 markets. Spots 
kid's shows are being scheduled for three weeks. Buyer: Elo 
Beatty. Agency : Leo Burnett Co., Chicago. 



RADIO BUYS 

Standard Brands Incorporated, New York: In addition to it- 
schedules which started earlier this month, radio schedules for Cha 
& Sanborn regular coffees are being set in the top markets for tl 
latter half of this month. Traffic minutes and chainbreaks, with er 
phasis on Wednesday-Thursday-Friday, will run for four wee! 
Bu\er: Carrie Senatorie. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., M 
York. 

Esso Standard Oil Co., New York: The Spring campaign for F 
started in Southern markets the early part of this month and gets 
tn full suing nationally the last week in April, in about 30 markel 
Schedules are for four weeks, day minutes, chainbreaks and LP. 
Buyer: Judy Bender. Agency: McCann-Erickson, New York 
American Tobacco Co., New York: Buying traffic minute scl e 
ules in the top markets for Pall Mall. Schedules are in three Aid 
beginning 16 May and running through 5 September. Buyer: Ffl 
Spruytenburg. Agency: SSCB, New York. 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 1 > 




YOU MAY NEVER HAVE 69 CHILDREN*- 



NSI SURVEY— KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS AREA 

(November, 19S9) 
STATION TOTALS FOR AVERAGE WEEK 





HOMES DELIVERED 


PERCENT OF TOTAL 




WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


Aon. thru Fri. 










a.m.-Noon 
oon-3 p.m. 
p.m.-6 p.m. 


57,000 
72,100 
62,100 


29,300 
38,900 
43,600 


66% 

65% 
58% 


34% 
35% 
42% 


un. thru Sat. 










p.m.-9 p.m. 
p.m.-Midnight 


141,600 
117,800 


81,300 
62,400 


63% 

65% 


37% 

35% 



*Mrs. Fedor Vassilet (Russia) gave birth to 69 
children in 27 confinements, including 16 pairs 
of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets. 



BUT... WKZO-TV Will Swell 
Your Family Of Followers 
In Kalamazoo -Grand Rapids! 

In the Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids area it's impossible 

to reach as many people as economically as you can with 

WKZO-TV! 

WKZO-TV delivers more homes than Station 'B' in 
398 of 450 quarter hours surveyed, Sunday through 
Saturday (NSI Survey, see left). A 9-county ARB Survey 
(April 17-May 14, 1959) covering 300,000 TV homes 
gives WKZO-TV an overwhelming lead in popularity — 
first place in 74.6% of all quarter hours surveyed! 

And — if you want all the rest of outstate Michigan worth 
having, add WWTV, Cadillac, to your WKZO-TV 
schedule. 




WKZ0TV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • lOOO' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 
For Greater Western Michigan 
Avery-Knode/, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



Florence 

blooms 



Here's a flower of the new 
South, fragrant with the vitality 
of youth, alive with the 
accomplishment of maturity. 
Here's Florence, symbol of a 
unique agricultural-industrial 
market in South Carolina, 
where 215,000 tv homes are 
effectively covered by one station: 



^WBTW 

Florence, South Carolina 

Channel 8 • Maximum power • Maximum value 
Represented nationally by CBS Tv Spot Sales 



A Jefferson Standard station affiliated with 
WBT and WBTV, Charlotte. 




SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 



^ SPONSOR 

1~6 APRIL 1960 




jD ORDER CHANGETH: BBDO just realigned analysis for more strength in changing ad world. At 
u, Ed Papazian, new media analysis director; 2nd from left, Kent D'Alessandro, director of media 
nning services. Others (I to r) : Mike Donovan, Herb Maneloveg, Bill Beste, associate media directors 



THE MEDIA 

ANALYST: 

EW MR. BIG 



^ A new power in buying decisions is on rise in 
agency media for guiding planners and buyers 

^ Significance: a deeper probe of all media 
which can have a profitable effect on broadcast 

I his week, media analysts at BBDO are adjusting to new 
roles as the former radio/tv research group merges with the 
media analysis department. Shift in a nutshell: what had been 
radio/tv research now becomes media analysis (along with 
print media research) ; what had been media analysis now 
becomes media planning service. Media analysis now handles 
actual analyzing of all media, while techniques and procedures 



s'SOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



3 BIG WHYS BEHIND THE TREND 




BUYING TEAM: M BBDO, buyers and analysts work closely together. (Clock- 
wise) Hal Duchin, buyer lor Campbell Soup; Phil Tocantins, timebuyer for Lever; 
Ed Papazian, media analysis dir.; Kent D'Alessendro, dir. media pla-- '-; ;;•• :t; 



1 



HIGH COST of advertising, heavy investments in tv. plus 
stiff competition jor product sales have made clients and their 
agencies look for top efficiency through media analysis 



2 



NEW RESEARCH — especially the deluge oj smart, sophisti- 
cated studies b\ print media i along uith more mountains of 
data on air media ) helps raise stature of analysts who sift it out 



3 



MARKET AND STATION picture today has grown into 
such a jungle of complexity that without expert media analysts 
to untangle it. timebuyer s would find decisions tough to make 



fall to the planning service personnel. 

Significance: One more develop- 
ment in the quiet but steady tighten- 
ing of ranks within advertising agen- 
cy media departments to form more 
formidable buying teams, and the re- 
sulting emergence of media anabsis 
as an increasingly important factor. 

To broadcast advertising it is of 
special significance not only for what 
it means in more sophisticated buv- 
ing decisions but also because air 
media — particularly tv — has had a 
lot to do with the development of the 
trend. 

Here are the reasons behind the 
^ stature of media research, 
here's how it functions in its new 
importance, and here's what the im- 
plications are for advertisers and the 
tv radio industrv: 



From the many agencies that have 
joined the trend, two were selected 
for study : giant BBDO where the 
latest development took place, and 
Donahue & Coe. smaller in size but 
high-ranking in creativity. The simi- 
larities are many: chief one is that 
at both agencies the media analvsis 
groups have been upgraded to full 
media team membership, 
side by side with planners and buy- 
ers. Differences are few: about the 
only significant one. in fact, is in the 
size of the analysis staffs. Al 
the group numbers four: at BBDO. 
about 15. 

Marty Herbst. director of media 
research and special assistant to me- 
dia director Gerrv Arthur, heads the 
D&C unit. The BBDO operation is 
headed by Ed Papazian. director of 



media analysis, and Kent D'Alessa 
dro. director of media planning serj 
ices. 

All three of these personalities rej 
resent, as do their counterparts 
most of the other top agencies, a k 
breed of adman that has stepped iri 
the spotlight since television — youq 
men and women well-grounded in sb 
tistics but with the open-minded qui 
ity that enables them to look i 
number and say. "It ain r t necessari 
- 

"Media analysts have come a lo: 

Marty Herb 

"from their original role of coDe 

tors of rating histories and com 

-: iirures. and their gro» 
has paralleled the expansion of te 
vision. As this medium has hecot 
increasingly competitive, it becar 
more difficult for an agency 
achieve a distinct advantage for i 
clients. 

"it's sort of like the general gro» 
of our country ." Herbst went on. [ 
frontier days, everyone 
scramble in and try to achieve I 

our more mature soci-^ 
requires meticulous planning and i 
search to achieve profits. 

"Media research and analysis is 
sound method for maintaining : 
advantage for clients in an enviio 
ment of shrinking differences." 

: adcast advertiser has I 
come quite aware of these shrin 
: iting differences betwa 
show s. for example, have been shrin 
ing steadily for about five ved 
Shows that run away with the ratid 
as did / Love Lucy are not likely j 
come along soon again: today, a | 
of good fare is spread across 
board and the sponsor is faced wl 
looking closer at closer point difrJ 
ences. This is just one reason | 
air media advertisers invest an i 
mated S7 million in rating serrkf 
and why the media analyst who 
their watchdog is growing mon 
port an t. 

But the new demands on the 
media analyst so far beyond < 
ing rating data: he must make sim 
sense out of these statistical mo^ 
tains and translate them to a clie: 
needs. He must also answer all a i 
ent's questions, and clients, as tl 
grow increasingly savvy, keep askl 
more- 
One big reason for emphasis 



30 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL l f J 



edia analysts is the flood of new, 
phisticated research coming out of 
int media ( SEP's ad-exposure stud- 
5 is an example), and these prompt 
lot of client questions. 
"There is more comparable data on 
posure opportunities today than 
er before," says Mike Donovan, 
.sociate media director for Lever at 
BDO, "and it's got to be checked 
fit. This is the job for the media 
jialyst, and he must be a good ad- 
an. He must operate in the logistics 
research, must interpret and apply, 
:ek out additional information when 
jftssary and always dig for the true 
cts/' 

Small wonder that the new media 
.lalyst has earned himself a solid 
,iot on both media buying and plan- 
f ng teams, and that station reps or 
jt salesmen are getting to know him 
itter. From radio days until quite 
gently, reps dealt almost exclusively 
,ith timebuyers; today, they fre- 
jently find at the timebuyer's side 
le media analyst. 
I Media analysts often help reps and 

NALYSIS IN ON THE ACT: At Donahue 
rthur, media vice president, and (standing) 
ianns. The media analyst, in his new stature, 




ANALYSTS AT WORK: Donahue & Coe 
research group tackle some statistics logistic- 
ally. Marty Herbst, center, is agency media 
research director. He is assisted here by staff- 
ers (I and r) Pete Swan and Joe Hoffman 



stations by guiding them into the 
right kind of studies. About two years 
ago, Lincoln, Neb., was largely over- 
looked in market lists. Advertisers 
bought Omaha on the East, Kearney- 
Hastings to the West, figured them to 
cover Lincoln. Agency media analysts 
guided the Lincoln tv station into the 
right kind of research studies, helped 
land it a place on most market lists 
including P&G's. 

There was another more recent 
case of a station man who kept beat- 
ing at agencv doors with little suc- 



cess, finally carried in to the bu\er 
a bushel of fan mail. Media analysts 
suspected he really had something to 
sell but had no documentation. They 
suggested he skip the dramatics of 
lugging in mail, recommended the 
type of study he should have done. 
Results turned out as the analysts 
suspected, and the station was bought. 

The tremendous dollar investments 
in tv, the swelling of ad budgets, and 
the growing competition for product 
sales is still another factor that has 
pushed the agency media analyst to 
the fore. From planning a campaign 
to buying it, he cannot be out of the 
picture; there is nothing like an in- 
expensive mistake in modern adver- 
tising. Besides this, markets, station 
stories, program appeal, audience 
data, and print studies have become 
so complex that the research analyst 
must work hand-in-glove with buyers. 

How broad a field does a media 
analyst cover? Marty Herbst out- 
lined some of the activities: probe 
and evaluate the rating reports; ex- 
( Please turn to page 50) 



& Coe (I to r), Marty Herbst, research director 
Gordon Vanderwarker, media supervisor for Corn 
is not only the client's constant watchdog, but is 



and special assislant to media director; Gerry 
Products, entertain CBS TV salesman Carl Till- 
>ften help to broadcasters in their station studies 




AD COUNCIL OF 50 TO JUDGE 



^ Leading admen named for first commercials festival ; 
2,000 entries expected; video tape facilities are set 

^ Wallace Ross to preview sampling of tv commercials 
at 4A's annual convention in Boca Raton, 20-22 April 



■ ifty outstanding advertising fig- 
ures will serve as the tv commer- 
cials council of the American Tv 
Commercials Festival and Forum in 
New York City next month. The fes- 
tival is being presented by Wallace 
A. Ross in association with sponsor 
and the council. 

The council, which was formed to 
judge commercials and make awards, 
is composed of representatives of im- 
portant advertisers and major agen- 
cies. Council members also represent 
an impressive cross-section of creative 
and art directors, copy chiefs, and 
production directors. 

More than half of the membership 
of the council consists of agency men 
well known in the industry. Their 
agencies include the following: N. W. 
Ayer, BBDO, Leo Burnett, Fletcher 
Richards. Campbell-Mithun, Comp- 
ton, Cunningham & Walsh, D'Arcy, 
Doyle Dane Bernbach, Dancer, Fitz- 



gerald-Sample, William Esty, Foote, 
Cone & Belding; Erwin Wasey, Ruth- 
rauff & Ryan; Guild, Bascom & Bon- 
figli, Grey, Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
Maxon, McCann-Erickson, Lennen & 
Newell, Needham, Lewis & Brorby; 
J. Walter Thompson, Young & Rubi- 
cam, and Warwick & Legler. 

Approximately a dozen other coun- 
cil members are executives of impor- 
tant advertisers such as AT&T, Bris- 
tol-Myers, Colgate-Palmolive, Esso, 
General Electric, General Mills, Lever 
Brothers, Kellogg, National Biscuit 
Company, Philip Morris, Plymouth- 
DeSoto-Valiant and Rayco. One coun- 
cil member will be the president of an 
important station in the commercials 
area, KTTV, Los Angeles. (See chart, 
p. 33 for a complete list of names of 
council members.) 

Three members of the TV Com- 
mercials Council were judges at In- 
ternational Advertising Film Festivals 



that took place in Cannes and Venid 
They are: John Freese, radio/tv col 
mercial production manager for Y&i 
Harry Wayne McMahan, tv consuj 
ant and author, and Donald Widluq 
international production manager f 
J. Walter Thompson. 

Two major functions of the coun* 
will be 1) to set criteria and decii 
on meaningful awards on 26 Apr) 
and 2) to present awards on 20 M\ 
at the conclusion of the festival. 

The council is the first such gro« 
to be formed in American tv; tl 
festival is also the first event of i 
kind in the United States. 

Ross, festival director, has pi 
dieted that over 2,000 commercia 
will be entered in the festival. Stai 
ing on 26 April, the council will naj 
row these entries down to the 23 
commercials which will be screen* 
at the festival from 18-20 May. 

An important change in the stra 
ture of the festival has made it pc 
sible for video tape commercials 
be submitted to the festival witho 
transfer to film. Special network virl< 
tape facilities will be provided at tl 
festival for closed-circuit tape scree 
ings, and Westinghouses TvAR h 
provided its tape facilities for tl 
council's preliminary screenings. B 



4A'S PREVIEW THIS WEEK 

A selection of commercials entered in the 
American Tv Commercials Festival will be 
previewed before delegates attending the 
annual convention of the 4/4's in Boca 
Raton, 20-22 April Wallace Ross, festi- 
val director, will introduce the commer- 
cials, which were chosen for their value in 
illustrating new techniques in the field 



THE 'COMMERICALS CLASSICS' 




Vintage commerce 
will be screened as 
special event of t 
festival. Left, B. V. 
film commercial whii 
was prepared by Gr< 
Adv. and Screen Gsr 



■ Pi 



Entry deadline foi 
mercials Classics • 
regular competitii 
Friday. 22 April. Right, 
Ajax film for Sherman & 



Ma 



oduc 



through Shamus Culha 




V COMMERCIALS FESTIVAL 



>e 



these tape facilities were volun- 
d, it had been announced that 
kinescopes of tape commercials 
1 be entered. This is no longer 
ssary. 

alteration of the timetable of 
estival will make it possible for 
xtisers. agencies and producers to 
lit entries at later dates. The en- 
deadline has been extended to 
av. 22 April. 

lere have been several innova- 
to be introduced in connection 
the festival. Information on ad- 
sing objectives is being assem- 
from data collected on a ques- 
tire within entry forms. This in- 
ation will be analvzed in a studv 
e released at the termination of 
estival. It is probably the widest 
v of advertising objectives ever 

frtaken among U. S. tv users, 
le of the most interesting features 
ie festival will be a collection of 
mercial Classics. Commercials 

■ the past ten years of television 
;stinct from commercials of the 

12 months which may enter the 
a screenings and competition — 

■ be assembled to provide the first 
ry of American tv commercials, 
e of the commercials to be 
:ned in this grouping are still re- 
ibered even though the programs 
in which they were telecast are 
•ut forgotten. 

ie Commercials Classics will be 

;ned on the afternoon of 20 May 

'wing the awards luncheon. All 

mings. luncheons and other 

ts will take place at the Hotel 

l< -evelt in New York City over a 

I '-day period commencing 18 May. 

1 ,ie industry reaction to the fes- 

ji has produced several unexpected 

fe lopments. An unusually large 

fc ber of entries came directly from 

W rtisers themselves, and in addi- 

i< | many advertisers asked their 

s to be certain that they made 

lissions for their products. 

advertisers have been excited 

t entering." Ross stated, "prob- 

because they have never had an 

Ttunity before this to enter an 

«sor • 16 APRIL 1960 



THESE JUDGES WILL PICK THE WINNERS 



JOHN P. CUNNINGHAM, chairman of the board, C&W 



BEN ALCOCK, v.p. asso 
HERMAN BISCHOFF, tv 
DANTE BONFIGLI, exec. 
FRANK BRANDT, v.p. tv 



eative director, Grey 
Urector. L&N 

art dept. head. Guild, Bascom 
mercial production, Compton 



& Bonfigli. SF 



ALEXANDER E. CANTWELL, v.p. head radio, live, tape prod., BBDO 

ANDREW CHRISTIAN, v.p. exec, producer tv, Warwick & Legler 

JOSEPH FOREST, v.p. radio tv commercial department, Esty 

MARK A. FORGETTE, manager tv commercial dept., J. Walter Thompson. Chicago 

JOHN FREESE, manager radio tv commercial production, Y&R 

S. J. FROLICK, senior v.p. & tv radio director, Fletcher Richards 

HANNO FUCHS, v.p. copy director, Young & Rubicam, S.F. 

DAVID GUDEBROD, manager film production, Ayer 

BERNARD HABER, v.p. head of film production, BBDO 

ROLLO W. HUNTER, v.p. director tv/ radio, EWR&R 

ROBERT JOHNSON, v.p. creative director radio tv. D'Arcy. St. Louis 

WILLIAM W. LEWIS, tv production, Maxon 

ARTHUR H. LUND, v.p. radio/tv. Campbell-Mithun. Mpls. 

NORMAN MATHEWS, v.p. dir. radio tv commercial production D-F-S 

GORDON MINTER, v.p. radio tv. Leo Burnett. Chicago 

JOHN W. MURPHY, v.p. commercial production, K&E 

ROGER PRYOR, v.p. broadcast production, FC&B 

PHYLLIS ROBINSON, v.p. copy chief, DDB 

MARGOT SHERMAN, v.p. chairman of creative plans board, McCann-Erickson 

KENNETH C. T. SNYDER, v.p. tv radio creative dir.. \L&B 

ROBERT J. STEFAN, v.p. manager Hollywood Office, BBD&O 

HOOPER WHITE, manager commercial production, Leo Burnett. V. Y. 

DONALD WIDLUND, manager international production, JWT 

WILLIAM R. WILGUS, v.p. manager Hollywood Office, JWT 

SAMUEL C. ZURICH, supervisor radio & live tv production, Ayer 

RICHARD E. DUBE, manager, broadcast production, Lever Bros. 

JAMES S. FISH, v.p. director advertising. General Mills 

ROGER M. GREENE, v.p. advertising. Philip Morris 

WILLIAM E. HAESCHE, JR., advertising manager tv radio, AT&T 

BETTY KANTOLA, public relations, Esso 

M. M. MASTERPOOL, advertising manager, Housewares Div., GE 

JACK W. MINOR, marketing dir.. Plymouth-DeSoto-Valiant 

RALPH P. OLMSTEAD, v.p. advertising director, Kellogg 

JULIUS RUDOMINER, v.p. advertising & sales, Rayco 

HARRY F. SCHROETER, director advertising, National Biscuit 

DOUGLAS L. SMITH, adv.-mdsg & dir., S. C. Johnson 

ALFRED WHITTAKER, advertising director, Bristol-Myers 

ROBERT W. YOUNG, v.p., dir. mktg., Hshld. Pdcts. Div., Colgate-Palmolive 

RICHARD A. MOORE, president, gen. mgr., KTTV, L. A. 
BEATRICE ADAMS, v.p. & creative dir., Gardner, columnist TELEVISIOX 
HARRY WAYNE McMAHAN, tv consultant, columnist ADl ERTISLXG AGE 
JOHN E. McMILLIN, executive editor, columnist SPONSOR 



exhibition of commercials based on 
product groups and appraised by pro- 
fessional standards." 

Trade groups such as the West 
Coast Producers Society also have 
been enthusiastic about the festival, 
even though the events are scheduled 
for New York. The society expressed 
its desire to cooperate in the festival 
at the time it was first announced. 
Six members of the council are 
West Coast advertising executives 
who were nominated to represent 
their region by the society. 

This week the 4A's invited Ross to 
appear in Boca Raton before the dele- 
gates attending the annual conven- 
tion. From Wednesday through Fri- 
day, 20-22 April, a selection of the 
commercials to be shown at the fes- 
tival in New York will be screened 
for the 4A's delegates. 

Ten commercials in each of 25 
different product categories will be 
selected for trade screenings on Wed- 
nesday, Thursday and Friday, 18, 19 
and 20 May. The 25 categories have 
been divided into two groups, with 
Group I to be screened Wednesdav 
afternoon and Thursday morning and 
evening, and Group II on Wednesdav 
morning and Thursday afternoon and 
evening. Morning screenings are at 
10:00 a.m., afternoon sessions at 2:00 
p.m., and the evening screenings at 
6:00 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. respectively. 

The commercials in Group I are 
from these product categories: auto- 
motive, appliances, baked goods, beer 
and ale, bathroom soap, breakfast 
cereals, cigarettes, coffee and tea, cos- 
metics and toiletries, dairy products, 
dentifrices, and consumer services (fi- 
nancial and utilities). 

Group II will consist of commer- 
cials in gasoline and oil, hair prepara- 
tions, household cleansers and waxes, 
institutional, jewelry, laundry soaps 
and detergents, paper products, patent 
medicines, prepared foods and mixes, 
retail stores, shortenings, soft drinks, 
travel and transportation. 

Following the Wednesday and 
Thursday trade screenings, the jury 
of council members will review the 
commercials at a closed screening on 
Friday morning. 2d May. Wards will 
be made public and the winners will 
be screened at the Awards Luncheon, 
1 pin. that day. The Commercials 
Classics follow. ^ 



PURITAN'S TV DRIVI 
WINS DEALERS, DAD! 

^ Menswear manufacturer schedules two-thirds t 
spots late in evening when the retailers can see the 

^ Success spurs new Father's Day push set to kick-a 
15 May with 600 spots in New York and Los Angel 



f\s Father's Day draws near, hun- 
dreds of menswear dealers in New 
York and Los Angeles are moving 
colorful Puritan Ban-Lon shirt dis- 
plays into prime window locations, 
setting up counter cards and final- 
izing plans for local print ads fea- 
turing the shirt. The catalyst for all 
this activity: Puritan's month-long 
600 spot tv drive, to kick off in the 
two markets 15 May. 

"Puritan's advertising dollar is 
spent the way the retailer would 
want it spent," explains the firm's 
director of advertising and merchan- 
dising, Myron Silverman. "Our phi- 
losophy in a nutshell — we think like 
a retailer." It's this philosophy, dra- 
matically implemented by tv, which 
is most responsible for current dealer 
enthusiasm, and skyrocketing Ban- 
Lon sales, he said. 

In practice, the Puritan philosophy 
works out this way for the upcoming 
Father's Day drive. The tv schedule 
is slated to begin 15 May, with 150 
spots each to be aired on WPIX. 
WNEW-TV, and WOR-TV, New 
York, and on KTTV in Los Angeles. 
On Sunday 5 June, once the spots 
have taken hold, Puritan will run a 
full-color, two-page spread in the 
New York Times and Los Angeles 
Times, highlighting the Ban-Lon shirt, 
relating back to the tv spots and 
listing the dealers where the shirt 
can be purchased. By virtue of this 
ad, every dealer who stocks Ban-Lon 
will have a sense of participation in 
the tv campaign. The dealer is fur- 
ther integrated into Ban-Lon's plans 
with companv-supplied counter cards, 
which again relate to the tv push, 



racks of shirts for window displai 
and ad mats which the retailer, und 
instructions from Puritan, will r 
in local newspapers 1 and 10 Juj 
Using tv as a base, Puritan has tB 
evolved a Father's Day campa| 
promoting the brand and retail trail 
and has enlisted controlled dea| 
support in both these areas. 

This strategy, first tested 
spring, date of Puritan's initial 
move, grew out of client-agency 
labration among Silverman, presid 
Frank Titelman. general sales ni 
ager Leonard Titelman, and 
Breitner, v.p., Wesley Associates. 

The first step was a bold 
Throwing away the book, the 
pany decided to test the new streat 
in the complex New York markel 
a crucial pre-Father's Day campa: 
Silverman points out that "by test 
in New York, we were able to sh 
case the Puritan promotion to visit 
out-of-town buyers." 

Puritan proceeded to buy 150 s| 
on WNEW-TV, scheduled ' two-thi 
of them late in the evening so that 
tailers could see them, and the 
maining one-third during the < 
This division takes on height-; 
significance when it's matched 
against Puritan's projection 
80% of the market during 
Father's Day promotion would 
women. The seeming contradic 
is explained by Breitner, saying 
was important to the company 
the retailer to actually get to set 
spots himself." 

There was nothing super-su 
about the spot pitch, but at 
same time it wasn't loud, or raut< 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 



male announcer pointed out the 
tues of various Ban-Lon styles 
ile the video showed a model 
aring the corresponding shirt. The 
nmercial closed with an actual 
nonstration of the wash-and-wear 
>perties of Ban-Lon. as the shirt 
s tossed into a washer, and later 
ippeared looking fresh and new. 
4s an added retail traffic builder 
was decided to incorporate a lot- 
y-type contest, organized by Con- 
ts Unlimited, N. Y., as part of the 
mpaign. Entry blanks were made 
ailable at all Puritan dealers and 
I tag on the tv spot told viewers that 
jy were there, and that the grand 
ize was a Renault Dauphine. Did 
S contest work? Hal Breitner re- 



ports that more than 180,000 entry 
blanks were picked up in the 200 
stores that participated in the promo- 
tion. And Breitner points out that 
the persons who came to the store to 
enter the contest weren't necessarily 
the people who would have otherwise 
come to make a purchase. 

The campaign lasted for one 
month, included the Times ad, store 
displays and retail newspaper inser- 
tions that have since become an in- 
tegral part of the Ban-Lon strategy. 
Results: Puritan sales of Ban-Lon 
shirts increased bv over 100% dur- 
ing the next order period. 

"The reason for the success of the 
campaign was the tremendous dealer 
enthusiasm," avows Silverman, "and 



what fired up the dealers, was our 
plan to use spot tv." 

Puritan ran its second tv campaign 
in New York last September, once 
more with a contest tie-in. Though 
results are incomplete at the moment, 
indications are that this campaign 
was as much a success as the first. 

In the current campaign Puritan 
has dropped the contest because it 
does not wish to be known as a 
"gimmick" advertiser and because it 
has established to the satisfaction of 
its retailers the fact that the tv strate- 
gy is a traffic-builder in itself. 

Tv has come of age for Puritan, 
and the company is now forming 
plans to make further use of the 
medium in other, leading markets. ^ 



IECKING OVER list of participating dealers whose names will appear in June "New York Times" and "Los Angeles 
(r), v.p. at Wesley Associates, and client general sales manager Leonard Titleman of Puritan. At left is Bai 



are Hal Breit- 
■ display-rack 




\ 





If you 



Here is jxirt of a heart-uarming ianc 
heart-rending i letter received recenh 
ly at SPONSOR from Coy Palmer, 
owner KPD\. Pampa, Texas, 
you're ever tempted to think of Madi 
son Avenue as the original Ulcei 
Gulch, read this saga of placid Textu 
life at a Class II station. Palmet 
says. "If the jxice kills me. there is 
nice equity that the family can at lea 
live on for several years.' He lik*^ 
the rat race in a small market bett^i 
than the back-stabbing of a big mar 
ket. Hou do you feel about 



M 



heart was bleeding for th< 
manager after reading thi 



poor 

"Hectic Day of a Station Manager.' 

page 34 in your 5 March issue. 

Huh! You should hear about th^ 
life of a co-owner and general mana 
ger of a small town radio station oo 
eration. In this kind of place when 
you double as news man. announcer 
commercial man. on-the-air person 
ality. copywriter, traffic manager, bil 
collector, etc. 

To begin with his hours are < 
attractive. Here follows a typica 
day. and this is not exaggerating. 

8:15: On the air for 30 minute 
with a program, playing piano, orgai 
answering phone calls, giving con 
mercials. and in general keepina th 
program alive with comments hen 
and there. 

8:45: Show over, go to office. Lo<>! 
at what the schedule would be if i 
were possible to follow it. At least 
see the things that must be attends 
to — whether it's midnight or earli-^ 
when thev are gotten to. 

8:50: Take a phone call fron 
lady whose little darling needs to 
cord a song. An original no less, ai < 
they just know I could learn it ar<J 
play for her. Too. would I be 
kind as to appear with her on su 1 
and such a date to play for her. 

9:00: Talk briefly with bookke«p- 
about some special bill a client watt 
right now. 

9:05: Could I possibly be at tin 
Chamber office at ten for a meetii] 
of the so and so committee. I wou < 






vu\ 



ink you've got it tough — read this 



e to be late because of a program 
ould be on until 10:00. 
:15: Leave office for a remote 
adcast. One that is a regular 
adcast from a client's place" of 
iness, and in its eleventh year of 
adcast. 

:30: On air with interview pro- 
n lasting until 10:00. 
0:10: In committee meeting for 
mber. 

0:45: Leave the committee meet- 
1 still in progress to return to office. 
> ! )pen to think a client insisted I 
him that morning for a copv 
age. Hurry to his business, spend 
ninutes there and return to office 
'1:20. 

|L:25: Morning mail stacked on 
; that is already loaded with 
gs left over from day before. 
1:30: Look at mail and answer 
e letters needing immediate at- 
ion. 

1:55: Start to lunch and in comes 
k who only has one hour to re- 
'n in Pampa, and needs to get 
s to think about ordering sched- 

tfor next month for regional ac- 
lt. Needs a lengthy discussion. 
1:00 he is still going strong. He 
•l a later breakfast and assumes 
' yone else did. 
j:15: Leaving to get some sort of 

fh, get a call from a representa- 
who is placing a new kind of 
chandise in a local firm. Needs 
'jet me there at once to talk of 
sible radio advertising. Explain I 
not been to lunch and must have 
^h due to ulcers. He is angrv. and 
fjsts he will have to be gone in 30 
jutes. I explain that such people 
fciim have caused ulcers, and that 
I " i ill have lunch and if he is still 
Ire we will meet. He decides to 

' [:30: Arrive home for special diet 

1 !:00: Drive to the firm for confer- 
Jp. It lasts until 2:45. Suddenlv 
■(ember that I was due at a church 
Ming to provide information re- 
S ding time clearances for special 
Diadcasts coming up next week. 
Pjile on the way to the church, re- 



member I didn't write the copy for 
the client I had serviced that morn- 
ing. Oh well, Joe won't mind if I do 
it tonight and postpone starting him 
until tomorrow. 

3:00: Arrive at the church. Find 
the pastor and members all mad and 
upset. They can't possibly see why I 
should have been late. After calming 
their nerves, they decide not to go 
ahead with their plans. Too many 
other expenses have come up. 

3:15: On way to do a special re- 
mote from a store that is having a 
special sale. Will not settle for any- 
one but "me" for the job. 

3:30: On the air, and lucky that I 
didn't let something keep me from 
remembering to be there. 

3:50: On way back to office to an- 
swer more mail, write some copv. 

4:00: Writing letters, digging out 
information called for. Suddenh in 
walks the announcer. We are off the 
air. The engineer is out of town. I 
hurry to the transmitter site. Find 
that the wind has caused an overload 
by static electricity. Get station back 
on. 

4:30: On the way back to the office. 
Get call on the two-way radio there 
has been a serious wreck. I hurry to 
the scene. Serious. Two killed. Spend 
over an hour getting data and doing 
short broadcasts from the scene. 
Hurry back to write the story for the 
night news. The news man was sick 
today. 

5:55: Back in office. Remember we 
had promised to go with a couple to 
a banquet. Supposed to be ready by 
6:30: Hurry home. Rush through a 
bath, ready to go by 6:45. 

7:00: At banquet. The dinner mu- 
sic is sick. They knew ol' Coy would 
be there so just knew I wouldn't 
mind playing the organ for the mu- 
sic. (Actually I suspect they just 
sorta planned it that way I . 

8:00: Finally sit down to eat while 
rest of program is going on. The 
wife is plenty burned up since she 
seldom is with me anyway. By then 
the ulcers are churning so I can't eat. 

9:30: After three long-winded peo- 
ple, who are supposed to just make 



short announcements, have spent the 
entire time extolling their virtues, 
etc., the main speaker is introduced. 
He is a professional and is aware of 
the time so is kind and only takes 15 
minutes. 

10:00: Get the friends and wife 
home. Must go back to the office. 
Too many things that were left from 
the day before and must get them 
out. 

10:30: Back in office writing the 
copy I needed to write in the morn- 
ing. 

10:35: Call comes in. A client who 
has never used radio is mad at paper. 
Would I come to his store at once to 
get some copy and get him on the 
next morning early. 

Realizing that this might be our 
chance to land a big account. I drop 
everything and go down. Spend 30 
minutes with him, then decide to 
record his commercials. 

11:15: Back in office hunting the 
right sound, the right introductions 
to the commercials, finallv get them 
recorded. It's after midnight. All is 
quiet on the radio front. The night 
man has gone. I can work with quiet. 

Starting the copy that must be 
scheduled. Get it written, re-do the 
log getting those commercials all 
spotted. Write note to morning man 
explaining where transcriptions are 
for new spots, etc. 

1:00: Still have mail to answer. 
Decide might as well make a night of 
it and get the desk cleaned off. It is 
Sunday morning and I want a clean 
desk to start the next week with. 

Work two to three hours. A strange 
thing happens all this time. The 
phone rings every few minutes. To 
my knowledge, we never have anv- 
one at the station, yet. all through 
these two hours there are phone calls 
and the people seem to think it is 
commonplace for someone to be 
there. Mostly want to talk about 
weather forecast, or do we have a 
certain record, or some of them just 
drunks that are lonely and want to 
visit. 

Get home at 3:15 a.m. Go to bed. 
(Please turn to page 50) 



nsor • 16 APRIL 1960 



37 



Who's who in cigarette advertising 

I he complex of cigarette manufacturers and their on what account and where they can be reached, 
advertising agencies has become more confusing in For this reason, sponsor presents a rundown c 

recent years with the multiplicity of brands, types top advertising personnel for each of the Big Si 

and packaging. Few ad pros know who does what cigarette companies and their ad agencies, brand I 



AMERICAN TOBACCO— Albert R. Stevens, adv. mgr.; Alan Garratt, adv. mgr.; ACC d 

BRAND & MGR. ACCT. SUP. & AGCY. ACCT. EXEC. ASST. ACCT. EXEC. TIMEBUYER 



Pall Mall 

Alan Garratt 



CLIFFORD SPILLER 
SSCB, N. Y. 



BROOKS ELMS 
EDWARD GOING 



JOHN KELLEHER sup. 
FRED SPRUYTENBURG asst. 



Riviera 



CLEMENS HATHAWAY 
SSCB, N. Y. 



ARTHUR COSTILLO NONE 



3. Lucky Strike 

Albert R. Stevei 



THAYER CUMMINGS 
BBDO, N. Y. 



ARTHUR C. ERICKSON 
DAVID BELL 



HOPE MARTINEZ radio 
ANNE SLATTERY tv 



Hit Parade 

Garratt 



NO CURRENT ADVERTISING 
BBDO, N. Y. 



5, Dual Filter Tareyton GRAEME MAC LE0D 
■ ' CIIMRIMMCD KIM 



GUMBINNER ADV., N. Y. 



STANLEY EVANS NONE 

JAMES MC MENEMY 



JANET MURPHY 
DOROTHY BARNETT asst. 



6. Herbert Tareyton 



NO CURRENT ADVERTISING 
GUMBINNER ADV., N. Y. 



BROWN AND WILLIAMSON— J. W. Burgard, v.p. adv.; C. E. McDannald, adv. 



1 . Viceroy 



ALLAN MILLER 
TED BATES, N. Y. 



(FOR WHOLE BATES ACCOUNT: A. M. Foster, sr. v.p.-group head; D. Loomis, 
v.p. oper.; T. Howard Black Jr., v.p. staff; Al Reibling, acct. exec. est. & billing) 



NORM CHESTER asst. ,:,,- 
WM. E. WARNER synd. bin 
JOHN SINNOTT net buyer 
EDWARD C. POWELL spot 



2. Kool 



JOHN DOHERTY 
TED BATES, N. Y. 



TED LONERGAN NONE 



3. Life 



MILLER 

TED BATES, N. Y. 



BOWEN MUNDAY NONE 



SAME AS ABOVE 



SAME AS ABOVE 



4. Du Maurier 



MILLER 

TED BATES, N. Y. 



5. Kentucky Kings 



BRUCE CRAWFORD NONE 



Bel-Air 



7. Raleigh 



P. F. MARSHALL NONE 

KEYES, MADDEN, JONES, CHIC. 



DR. JAYE S. NIEFELD me 
MERLE MYERS buyer 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL LW 



for the 



6' and their agencies? 



brand, in this three-page chart. The Big Six in order concerns — Larus & Brother, Stephano Bros, U. S. 

pi 1959 production are R. J. Reynolds, American Tobacco and Riggio Tobacco — comprise practically 

Tobacco, Liggett & Myers, P. Lorillard, Brown & the entire United States cigarette industry. 

Williamson, Philip Morris. These, with four other Domestic cigarette production in '59 increased 





















BRAND & MGR. 


LIGGETT & 

ACCT. SUP. & AGCY. 


MYERS— L. W. Bruff, adv. dir 

ACCT. EXEC. ASST. ACCT. EXEC. 


TIMEBUYER 


.. 


Chesterfield 


JAMES E. KLEID 

MC CANN-ERICKSON, N. Y. 




ROBERT ROGERS MARION 
HARRY ELLSWORTH 


MINSTRI 




AL SANNO assoc. med. 
JOHN MORENA med. acct. sup. 
JOHN CURRAN broadcast buyer 
GINI CONWAY buyer 


> 
i 
1 

5 
3 

■ 

1 


Duke 


CARL EVERETT 
ME, N. Y. 




PAUL DOUGLASS NONE 






SAME AS ABOVE 


Oasis 


EVERETT 
M-E, N. Y. 




DOUGLASS NONE 






SAME AS ABOVE 


Fatima 


KLEID 

M-E, N. Y. 




NONE NONE 






SAME AS ABOVE 


Piedmont 


KLEID 

M-E, N. Y. 




NONE NONE 






SAME AS ABOVE 


L&M 


CLIFFORD L. FITZGERALD 
D-F-S, N. Y. 




NORMAN LAUCHNER NONE 






KEN TORGERSON sup. 
LOUIS FISCHER 


P. LORILLARD— Daniel L 


idd 


, dir. of adv. : George 


Whit mo re, 


brand adv. mgr. 


Kgnj FRANK CAMBRIA 
(GUILD COPELAND, SUP. ON BRANDS) 

LENNEN & NEWELL, N. Y. 




OLIVER TOIGO WALTER SENETE 




SALLY REYNOLDS 
JIM ALEXANDER 
MANNY KLEIN 



ELKIN KAUFMAN 
I Straight s\ 

DAVID LAUX 
{Filter) 

L&N, N. Y. 



NONE 

KEAT MURDOCK 



NONE 
NONE 



SAME AS ABOVE 
SAME AS ABOVE 



\ Newport 



LEO KELMENSON 
L&N, N. Y. 



FRANK O'HARE NONE 



Spring 



MARTIN DWYER 
L&N, N. Y. 



LAUX (NO CURRENT ADVERTISING) 

L&N, N. Y. 



! SPONSOR • 16 APRIL '. 



39 



6.1% over the year for a total of 462.7 billion, ac- the biggest loss, Regent (77.3' f ), compared with '58 
cording to Harry M. Wooten's annual survey of the sponsor's chart lists — in this sequence — the coin 

market. Of this total, filters accounted for 233.65 pany men directly responsible for the ad program 

billion; regular, 141.52 billion; unfiltered kings, the brands and brand managers (if any), the agen 

87.8 billion. Wooten reports the biggest individual cies, account supervisors, account executives am 

brand sales gain was shown by Newport (84.6%); timebuyers, for the Big Six producer-. 



PHILIP MORRIS — Roger M. Greene, v.p.. dir. adv.: Thoma- Chri-tensen, adv. mgr. 
BRAND & MGR. ACCT. SUP. & AGCY. ACCT. EXEC. ASST. ACCT. EXEC. TIMEBUYER 



1. Philip Morris 



OWEN B. SMITH 
LEO BURNETT, CHIC. 



HAROLD TILLSON med. , 



2. Marlboro 

John T. Landry 



SMITH 
LB, CHIC. 



RICHARD HALPIN NONE 



GUSTAV PFLEGER acct. su-p. 



3. Mayfield 

Robert S. Gordon 



SMITH 
LB, CHIC. 



4. Parliament 

Perry E. Leary 



CRAWFORD BLAGDEN 
BENTON & BOWLES, N. Y. 



DON HARRIS assoc. med. di 
DAVID WEDECK asst. med. I 
JIM THOMPSON buyer 
JERRY NOONAN asst. 
WALTER REICHEL asst. 



5. 


Benson & Hedges 

Gordon 


CHARLES C. ROLLINS 
DOYLE DANE BERNBACH 


N Y. 


HAROLD SELTZER RONALD WHYTE 


NONE 


6. 


Alpine 

Alan Bick 


ROLLINS 
DDB, N. Y. 




SELTZER WHYTE 


JEAN JAFFE 


7. 


Spud 


ROLLINS 
DDB, N. Y. 




SELTZER WHYTE 


NONE 


R. J. REYNOLDS— Howard Gray. adv. mgr. 


1. 


Camel 


JAMES J. HOULAHAN 
WM. ESTY, N. Y. 




THOMAS LUCKENBILL NONE 


HAROLD SIMPSON radio tx 1 
mg 


2. 


Winston 


SAME AS ABOVE 




GRANT THOMPSON NONE 


SAME AS ABOVE 


3. 


Salem 


SAME AS ABOVE 




SAM NORTHCROSS NONE 


SAME AS ABOVE 



Cavalier 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL l'» 




SPECIAL CHARACTERS were created for White Rose Te 
tapes: a.e. Ed Ridley (I), radio/tv dir. Victor Seydel. Invented profes 



Anderson & Caii 
stant also appear, animated, i 



low local tea holds off giants 



1 White Rose tea, local in New York, is outspent by 
-tvals 3-to-l but holds its own with smart radio buys 

Mixes 60's, 30's, I.D.'s adjacent to news, weather 
multi-station flights; uses two outlets in-between 



he tidal wave of tea advertising 
h which national and regional 
nts routinely engulf metropolitan 
> w York has yet to dampen the 
^■rits of primarily local White Rose. 
iiar-round ally to White Rose, both 
.offensive foray and holding effort: 
't radio. 
-""Vaturally Seeman Bros., which 
|rkets White Rose, and its agency, 
_^|derson & Cairns, cannot reply in 
id to the rivals' saturation meth- 
i!5. They are outspent up to 3-to-l. 
"Pley've maintained what they con- 
fer a "favorable competitive posi- 
f jn," with the help of a spot radio 
|ategy that blends selectivity, flexi- 
Uy and continuity. Currently the 



3NSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



tea company is in a four-station spot 
flight. Within a couple of weeks it'll 
drop back to a two-station sustaining 
campaign. 

What happens after that depends 
on market conditions. As A&C radio/ 
tv director Victor Seydel puts it, "In 
our position we must be able to make 
rapid strategy changes. Radio is very 
adaptable, ready to go into the breach 
and extend our total reach during a 
flight, or keep our name before the 
public in a sustaining period. And, 
with the loyal audiences stations de- 
liver, we can also maintain continuity 
where indicated." 

White Rose is primarily after the 
housewife and also welcomes adult 



male listenership. It concentrates on 
morning news, weather and top per- 
sonality adjacencies for its e.t.'s, with 
station lineups designed to reach peo- 
ple in all economic strata. 

The present flight, launched 28 
March to run about a month, is car- 
ried by WRCA, WOR, WNEW and 
WCBS. On WRCA, White Rose has 
three 30-second spots, Monday 
through Saturday a.m., all tied in 
with the station's weather jingles. 
The WOR buy consists of 10-second 
I.D.'s right after two newscasts be- 
tween 9 and 11 a.m., weekdays. 
Spread over the WNEW broadcast 
day, Monday through Saturday, W.R. 
has 15 minute announcements. And 
on WCBS the tea advertiser continues 
to sponsor a five-minute a.m. news- 
cast three days a week on an alter- 
nating basis. With this relatively per- 
manent WCBS buy, W.R. maintains 
continuity with what it looks on as a 
prestige program which will enhance 
its quality image. 

(Please turn to page 52) 



New tv data from TPI, Sindlinger 



^ Both services stress need for more qualitative 
analyses; delve into audience characteristics, attitudes 

^ TPI uses personal-coincidental interview, Sindlinger. 
24-hour telephone recall — methods new in syndication 



I he numbers are flying thicker and 
faster than ever along ad row. Where 
there were five syndicated rating 
services competing for the net tv ad- 
vertiser's dollar, now there are seven. 
Television Personal Interviews and 
Sindlinger. the new entries in this 
influential field of higher math, are 
among the first to admit that added 
starters aren't required for what they 



call the "quantitative"' research done 
by older practitioners. They're mo- 
tivated by what they consider a vital 
need for more "qualitative" findings. 
As they see it. sheer audience size 
doesn't tell the advertiser enough 
about his program's effectiveness; he 
has to know more about audience 
composition and characteristics as 
thev relate to his goals. 



While TPI and Sindlinger ha 
done tv research previously, n 
much of their material is availar 
on a syndicated basis, that is. reguii 
reports with a fixed format and av 
able to all qualified customers. 

Mainspring of TPIs method is tl 
personal-coincidental interview. U 
like any other syndicated servii 
TPI questions viewers right in thi 
own living room while the progra 
to be evaluated are on the air. Und 
this system the interviewer can v 
date which program is tuned i 
who is watching. He spends so 
12 minutes firing questions about 
household situation, punching repli 
on a coded IBM card for future pr 
essing. i TPI representatives rep< 



A CROSS-SECTION OF TPIS 100 RATING CRITERIA 



CORRECT 


VIEWED 


VlEWEl 


MALE 


PROOR.AM 


PR.O&RAM 


APPRAISAL 


AUDIENCE 


IDENTIFICATION 


LAST 


EXCELLENT 


SELECTOR. 



'ATCHIN& COFFEE 



Tiivie 


P/Mvl 1 LV 


NETWORK 


NEWSWEEK 


INCOME 


AUDIENCE 


SEP 
HOUSE- 




5har.ES 


HOLDS 







PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS is not determined simply by audience size, says TPI. Here is illustration 
of hoic profiles for three shows vary as various factors important to advertisers are used as measuring rod 



lly are refused entry by no more 
•an 10% of the homes called on, 
ith the average turndown at around 
S.) 

TPI interviewers record age and 
x of viewers, non-viewers, and fam- 
y members not at home, income and 
Mucation. They check ability to 
entify program and sponsor, atti- 
de toward program on a five-point 
ale, whether program was viewed 
ie week before, other activities in tv 
iom. who selected program, and 
Aether channel was switched to 
"ew present program. They delve 
<ito specific brand usage and pack- 
>e size in several product categories, 
id also determine intent to pur- 
lase such products. In addition, 
idio listening and presence of spe- 
fic magazines are checked. 
' TPI conducts this survey in seven 
ities for one week four times a year. 



It interviews a minimum of 600 dif- 
ferent households for every half hour 
of prime evening time during the 
week selected. The duplex method 
is used, whereby for each half hour 
300 interviews are coincidental and 
the rest based on 30-minute recall by 
the 300 households interviewed dur- 
ing the next half hour. 

Armed with resulting "qualitative" 
show popularity ratings from the 
seven cities, subscribers can have a 
program's effectiveness plotted on the 
basis of about 100 different criteria, 
according to a TPI official. (See 
chart for examples.) 

Sindlinger offers national audience 
size ratings, but looks on them pri- 
marily as a jumping-off place for its 
research into characteristics of the 
people in the audience, which is syn- 
dicated, and studies of product use 
and plans to buy on the part of the 



audience, available on a custom basis. 
The organization gathers its informa- 
tion by telephone the night after 
programs under study are aired, re- 
freshing memories via roster recall. 
Calls go out to a different sample of 
1,600 each night, from which an 
average of 1,220 are tv households 
and eligible for the survey. 

Here's what Sindlinger publishes 
daily, within a week after air time: 

• Tv sets in use by 15-minute 
periods and region. Local times are 
used as an aid to spot buys. 

• Tables showing sample count for 
every rating, so client's research de- 
partment can determine significance 
of rating changes. 

• Audience report in terms of 
people instead of sets tuned. It gives 
the percentage of males, females and 
children (both sexes under age 12) 

{Please turn to page 70) 



NET TV PICTURE COMES FROM SINDLINGER WEEKLY 



TV Share Base 

Program Could Be Viewed 



Program Coverage 




F. Program Coverage 

NBC - TV 

G. Total Households Tuned 



MANY-FACETED study of national tv ratings includes not only share of audience figures but such 
qualitative categories as age and sex of audiences, and whether program is viewed as whole or in part 



sponsor • 16 APRIL 1960 




The Shape of Thing 



Here is the "shape" that means truly fine pictures . . . 
the shape of the all new black-and-white television 
camera, the RCA TK-12. This is the camera that gives you 
sparkle and impact in your commercials, whether live or 
taped. Your advertisers' products can be revealed clear 
and sharp, in all their fine detail . . . Shadings and 
colorings stand out, with brilliance and realism. 

This completely new camera uses the large new RCA 
4V2-inch Image Orthicon tube. The 50% increase in 
image size results in the same degree of extra quality 
and detail you would expect from using a larger 
negative in advertising photography. 

Here is the camera for top telecasters, for those with the 
reputation of providing their advertisers with the very best. 



For the Finest Picture in Town! 

NEW MONOCHROME TV CAMERA-TK-12 
WITH 4V 2 -INCH IMAGE ORTHICON 



to Come 




^ RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT • CAMDEN, N. J. 



With increased buying complications, SPONSOR ASKS: 

Should a representative ever 

bypass the timebuyer 



A buyer and two station repre- 
sentatives discuss factors to be 
considered by sales personnel on 
approaching client or media head 

Evelyn Lee Jones, timebuyer, Donahue 
& Coe, Inc., New York 
This question can be answered w ith 
a plain "yes" and a fancy "no. \^ hen 
a rep completely bypasses an agency 
and goes directly to a client he's dead 




wrong! However, if the rep makes 
his pitch to the agency and a time- 
buyer flatly refuses, for no valid rea- 
sons, to discuss the proposal with his 
media director, supervisor or the cli- 
ent — it's difficult to prevent, or even 
condemn, the rep's direct approach 
to the client. If the agency has duly 
considered the pitch and. for any ore 
or a dozen reasons, rejects the idea of 
submitting it to the client, and if the 
rep still persists in his determination 
to visit the client, let him. If, by any 
chance, the client is impressed, he'll 
call his agency demanding to know 
why the proposal wasn't brought to 
his attention. The agency is ready 
for this call. It has all the negative 
facts at its fingertips. Such response 
cannot fail to impress the client just 
as a considered recommendation — 
even one that is not bought — brings 
momentary joy to a client's heart. He 
knows his agency is working for him. 
Timebuyers must recognize a few 
hard facts about reps; these expense- 
account trudgers have a job to do, a 
boss to report to, commissions to 
earn. Timebuyers who refuse to lis- 
ten to new, honest pitches are guilty 
of chasing reps to client doors. It's 
part of a buyer's job to listen to, and 
evaluate, pitches just as it's part of a 
rep's job to make them. One hard 



and fast rule should always apply to 
this rep-client situation: the agency 
should always be advised by the rep 
that he plans to make a client call to 
discuss market "X" and/or if the 
pitch is covered in a letter or tele- 
gram, the agency should receive a 
copy destined to reach it at the same 
time as the client receives his com- 
munique. A rep should never put a 
buyer — or an agency — out on a limb. 
A rep should always remember the 
slogan: a rep's best friend is his 
agencv list. 

Max M. Friedman, Eastern sales man- 
ager, HR Representatives, Inc., N. J . 
No. Xor should the timebuyer ever 
bypass a representative. The time- 
buyer receives his education and edi- 
fication from many sources, but pri- 
marily it is the representative who 
gives him the important data on mar- 
kets, stations, ratings and prices. So, 
of course, it's of the utmost impor- 
tance that a representative and a 
buyer work compatibly together — 
that the buyer be aware of all facts 
so he can intelligently present his 
supervisors and associates with the 
material they need for intelligent me- 
dia purchases. He must know as 




much or more about market fa< t- as 
the people to whom he reports. So he 
must never be bypassed. 

There may be some circumstances 
where a buyer is restricted to a bud- 
get that he has not created and the 
representative has a "creative" pitch, 
meaning new money. The rep then 
must go "upstairs." but from the bot- 
tom never from the top. Salesmen 
who have tried bypassing the time- 
bu\er completelv, usually find them- 
selves getting a hearing but having to 



go back to the buyer anyway foi 
analysis of the purchase. Under ot 
circumstances, when where's a dif 
ence of opinion between the bu 
and the representative a visit to 
upper echelon is sometimes necess 
— but only on the buyer's appro' 
In fact, the timebuver often wants 
rep to go "upstairs" with 
pitch." Another legitimate occas 
for a representative to go beyond 
buyer is when he wishes to registt 
complaint about the pre-buying 
stations without consulting the > 
peting stations' representative. 

To bypass a timebuyer, howev<- 
to lose a valuable contact. He 
miss possibly new and interesting 
teriaL The representative salesi 
who practices this bit of play is 1 
ing for an atmosphere of hostij 
As a buyer does not like to be 
passed, neither does the repress 
tive. 

Carl L. Schuele, president & ge\ 
manager, Broadcast Time Sales, New 

We at Broadcast Time Sales 
lieve very strongly in making d 
calls on clients. In fact, so dee 
our conviction, that we have e: 
lished a new function, the new 
ness development department, 
sole activity is to make calls on 
managers and advertising man; 
of client companies. 

The preceding paragraph is bi 
to raise a lot of eyebrows 
agency and station circles. Bu 
Broadcast Time Sales system ha 
ceived the approval and even 
cooperation of agencies, station- 
clients for two important reason 

1) In making direct calls, 
new business managers always 
creative ideas. We make general 
all proposals that demonstrate 
the use of certain radio techn 
will further the marketing obje< 
of the company. Again I'd hi 
emphasize: at this level. BTS 
all sells ideas. 

2 i We always aim for speci 
campaigns in addition to the 1 



U, 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 



lich the client has currently allo- 
ed. 

4gency media men have given 
ir vote of confidence to the BTS 
>cedure for this reason: The ad- 
ional test money BTS succeeds in 
,ting allotted to radio means extra 
nmission to agencies. In effect, 
're selling for them, the agencies. 
TTie new business development de- 
tment is a full-time specialty of 




S, and operates out of all 
inches. For example, Bob Cronin, 
w business manager at our Chicago 
ice, not only devotes his time to 
liking client calls, but is in charge 

new business sales promotion. He 
• responsible for administering a 

1- scale direct mail campaign, 
jamed at clients, which furnishes 

tv ideas and creative methods of 
ng radio. 

(We've found the reception at the 
jent level extremely enthusiastic, 
pecially when we're able to sit 
wn with sales managers. The BTS 

i' !3ory of selling radio is basically 
! it radio should be considered as a 

Mocal" extension to a sponsor's pres- 
t sales staff. Across the country are 
'^usands of razor-sharp salesmen 
adio personalities) ready to bring 
lur product to their loyal "follow- 
gs." Time after time we've proven 
!at radio salesmen reach, and can 

laijijll, every prospect for products or 
rvices. because everyone listens to 
dio! 

BTS' lead is now being followed by 
her reps, which is one good reason 
at radio is rapidly regaining its 
•ice at the conference tables. 
As exclusive radio representative, 
[is our unswerving duty to try and 
t radio the share of business it has 
ditfully earned by its achievements 
moving the nation's merchandise. 
Making client calls has proved to 

liH : one of the positive, effective means 
bringing radio to its deserved posi- 
>n of eminence. There are many 
lore factors that will aid radio's 
[use, and we who sell the medium 
ust be ever on the alert for better 
ays to put our story across. ^ 

onsor • 16 APRIL 1960 





Superior Programming 

is the reason why more 

appreciative listeners 

keep their radios tuned to 

Gordon Broadcasting Co. stations. 

Careful selection of the best interpretations in fine music, 

together with News in Depth, means fine radio . . . 

with advertising limited timewise— screened tastewise. 

KSDO 

San Diego 
est Fine Radio Buy In The Boom i ng-Buyi ng Southwest 



The Gordon Broadcasting Company 

KSDO San Diego AM KBUZ Phoenix AM and FM 



- 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaiq 



TV RESULTS 



BUILDING SUPPLIES 

SPONSOR: Vulcan Waterproofing Co. AGENCY: Marston Assoc. 
Capsule case history: Without a doubt Vulcan is sold on 
television advertising. In an effort to increase consumer 
sales and promote its waterproofing goods the Vulcan Wa- 
terproofing Co. of Toledo purchased a schedule of an- 
nouncements on WTOL-TV through its Detroit agency, 
Marston Assoc. Almost immediately Vulcan felt the increase 
in sales. In a letter to Hal Van Tassle of WTOL-TV, Wayne 
A. Marston expressed the appreciation of his client for the 
selling effort put forth in behalf of Vulcan and for the ex- 
cellent results. Total sales from the campaign surpassed 
Vulcan's expectations many times over. The outstanding in- 
crease was instrumental in the recent expansion of the com- 
pany's operation. "Our belief in the pulling power of tele- 
vision, and especially WTOL-TV, was not unfounded," said 
Marston. "We look forward to a long association with 
WTOL-TV that will be as productive as Vulcan's campaign." 
WTOL-TV, Toledo Announcements 



BAKERY PRODUCTS 

SPONSOR: Nolde Bread AGENCY: 1 

Capsule case history: When the Nolde Baking Co., 1 
folk-Hampton. Va., was offered minute participations 
WVEC-TV's new comedy strip show, Bungles and the Tl 
Stooges, (6-6:30 p.m., Monday-Friday), it decided t<> 
ahead and try a spot campaign in the kid's show. Re; 
made it clear to the bread people which side their advi 
ing is buttered on. Racking up a tremendous childr 
audience in a two month period — one segment got a 37, 
sales for its bread jumped dramatically. In its am 
distribution, which encompasses Norfolk-Hampton-New 
News, the advertising produced unprecedented volume 
the baking company. Sales gained momentum as fast as 
show itself, which also produced good results for the ( 
participating advertisers. Nolde's advertising manager \ 
WVEC-TV that "Bungles and the Three Stooges is wit 
question the best advertising in years for our prodt 
WVEC-TV Participa 



RESTAURANTS 

SPONSOR: Trinkhaus Manor AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The effectiveness of spot television 
was well illustrated by WKTV, Utica-Rome, during a contest 
which taught the potency of tv advertising to a restaurateur 
and wife-appreciation to husbands. In an effort to attract 
greater volume to Trinkhaus Manor, one of the area's most 
lavish supper clubs, WKTV scheduled a "Deserving Wife" 
contest. Husbands were invited to write, in 25 words or less, 
why they felt their respective wives deserved a night out. 
The winner received six nights out at Trinkhaus Manor and 
the runner-up four nights out. Additionally, baby sitters 
were provided. "The contest really opened my eyes to tele- 
vision advertising," said Anthony Trinkhaus, proprietor. 
"Wherever I went people were talking about the contest — 
even in Syracuse." Husbands did not wait to win the con- 
test, but began taking their wives to Trinkhaus. "From now 
on I am going to discontinue all other advertising and go 
in heavily for television in my promotions," Trinkhaus said. 
WKTV, Utica-Rome Announcements 



DRY CLEANING 

SPONSOR: G&K Cleaners (Gross Bros.-Kronick) AGENCY: 
Capsule case history: Although it owned two plants 
a good volume of business back in 1950, G&K Cle; 
wanted No. 1 position in the Minneapolis-St. Paul ma 
Newspapers were producing some results, but not spec 
larly. WCCO-TV persuaded I. D. Fink, its presiden 
switch the fairly large print budget entirely to tv on a 
basis. A heavy campaign of I.D.'s was scheduled and 
in two months both plants had to be expanded. Satis 
G&K then sponsored Masterpiece Theatre, WCOC-TV's 
run Sunday evening (9:30) movie. Sales skyrocketed 
time and sponsorship lasted six years, during which 
practically captured the entire dry cleaning market, w 
the station finally dropped the feature, it experimented 
a while with various schedules — and with equal sue! 
Today, still the leader, it sponsors on WCCO-TV two v| 
15-minute evening newscasts and runs monthly saturf( 
schedules for its special promotions throughout the \iu 
WCCO-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul Programs & Announce 



48 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 




Fresh, pure 
golden Orange Juice— 
!,000 quarts a minute 

from the 
market on the move! 



TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 



At the Tropicana Orange Juice plant in Bradenton, Flor- 
ida, 2,000 quarts of America's favorite fruit juice are 
processed every minute. As impressive as this is, it is only 
part of the 50,000,000 gallons of pure orange juice that 
will be processed by Tropicana and other similar plants 
in Florida this year. 

Reminder: This rich, healthy market is dominated by 
WTVT, the station on the move — your most profitable 
buy in the entire Southeast. 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

4-5.6%. ..Latest ARB 9:00 A.M.- Midnight 

Check the Top 50 Shows! 

ARB Nielsen 

WTVT 38 WTVT 34 

Station B 12 Station B 16 

Station C O Station C O 



Station on the move 



WTVT 

TAMPA -ST. PETERSBURG 



Channel 

13 



The WKY Television System, Inc. . WKY-TV/ WKY-RADIO, Oklahoma City . Represented by the Katz Agency 



\\l 



MEDIA ANALYST 

i Continued from page 31 I 
plore the techniques of the services 
and often guide them into new and 
productive areas: open new areas of 
investigation such as studies on early 
vs. late movies, how local kid shows 
or syndicated programs stack up: in- 
vestigate and study radio program- 
ing. In the case of network tv buys. 
the analyst must analyze the media 
values of the shows under considera- 
tion, check on competition by look- 
ing at data at local, multi-market and 
national levels. I Local level often 



shows most significant clues.) After 
this, the time period, sets-in-use, net- 
work share, lead-in and following 
program must all be examined, along 
with audience composition. The line- 
up must be analyzed. End figures may 
be a simple compilation of rating, 
homes reached and cost-per- 1,000. 
but the buy can turn on these esti- 
mates. 

In addition to this, clients must be 
furnished with full reports of how a 
campaign is doing at least every six 
months and presentations are pre- 
pared for new campaigns I at BBDO, 



IMPACT! 

ML 



MORE Metropolitan Share of Audience 
MORE Average Quarter-Hour "Homes Reached" 
THAN ALL Other El Paso Stations Combined* 

*ARB, November 1959 

In Metropolitan audience ... in area "Homes Reach- 
ed" audience . . . KROD-TV once again proves itself to 
be the dominant voice of El Paso. 53.2% Metropolitan 
Share of Audience . . . 53.9% of the total Average Quart- 
er-Hour "Homes Reached" . . . and that's in a competi- 
tive, 3-station. 3-network market. Ask your Boiling man 
for the full story on this must station in West Texas', 
Southern New Mexico's must market. 



© 



KROD -TV 
EL PASO, TEXAS 








Odessa-Midland 
El Paso 
Amarillo 
Lubbock 
Corpus Christi 
Houston 

Dallas-Fort Worth 
Temple 



Jack C Vaughn. Chai 

Cecil L. Trigg 

George C. Collie, I 



KROD-TV 

EL PASO 



Up 66.9'! 



KVII-TV KOSA TV 

AMARILLO ODESSA-MIDLAND 



lp 57.8'-, 

lp 53.3'", 

Up 50.9% 

Up 48.2% 

Up 47.7'-, 

Up 46.1% 

Up 45.5% 





this would be the work of the med 
planing services I . At all times, med 
analysis must mesh perfectly with tl 
agency research department and r 
keting strategy of each client. 

W hen a buyer selects a station 
is the end product of a long chain 
planning. Indeed, the analyst's ove 
all data on stations by markets 
predetermine the markets themsehf 

W ith so much reliance on analy 
could an agency's creativity be stifli 
by over-research? "Only if resean 
is not media-oriented, could thei 
such a danger," BBDO's Ed Papazi 
assured sponsor. "It's up 
media analyst to see it is oriente< 

"It's how you present and use 
numbers," D&C's Herbst said, 
any researcher who tries to hide 1 
hind them is in trouble." 

It*s unlikely that the Herbsts ; 
Papazians of the ad industry 
ever fall into that trap despite 1 
fact that the slide-rule was their or 
inal pass-key to advertising, 
rise to a top slot in buying decisic 
since tv grew up in the mid-50's 
inevitable. Indeed if one were 
trace tv's history, it might be i 
that first came the show business \: 
pie, next came the salesmen, and r 
(by special request of more sophi 
cated clients I comes a new wave 
strong men — media analvsts. 



KPDN 

{Continued from page 37) 

4:00: A terrific rain storm co 
in. Finally get to sleep. 

6:30: Phone ringing. Sleepih 
swer it. The Sunday morning 
cannot get the station on the air. 
engineer still out of town. Hastilji 
to the transmitter. The roof hi 
leak, and water all over the high \ 
age wires. Start drying process, 
nalh get electric heaters to hasten 
drying. Not safe to turn the tr 
mitter on for at least another 30 l 
utes, maybe longer. Wires are soa 
8:00: Receive a call from the 
tor of a church that has an I 
broadcast at 8:30. Why are wd 
on the air? Of all mornings he l 
be on this morning because 
weather is so bad that most will 
home to listen. Too, his great 
so and so cousins, nephews, ui 
and everyone else are in town 
want to hear him preach, etc. 
He does not care what kind of 1 
ble we have, get that station oi 
air or he will cancel, etc., etc. I 



16 APRIL 



USO-WHEREVER THEY GO! 



SAC 

.bus; 

STOP 



J? ■■ 


s**^ f 


j "v . 


pigg 


!|fS|l 








IBB*?! \«i 




JKdkV'^ffl * Hff3 


~ ^^ffli ^Jk3 


*m .-■' ,— i^j i/R 3 JL ^r 1 BPi 


8 


pvw 




I 


\ 1 



■ j 



April-USO Month 

Listed in the March-April Issue of the 
Ad Council's Radio-TV Bulletin 

JSO's World-Wide Services to Our Cold War Armed Forces Include: 

• 238 USO clubs and lounges for off-post recreation and counsel 

• Mobile services on wheels to remote Nike and radar sites 

• USO show troupes touring overseas military bases year-round 



8: 10: Decide it will he safe to turn 
the transmitter on. It spews and 
spotters a few seconds, but nothing 
serious develops, and at 9:00 I de- 
cide it will hold. Make note to get 
an electrician there at 1 :00 and put 
in new wiring. I have bypassed some 
of the burned and shorted wiring 
enough, so that it will probably be 
all right until that afternoon. 

9:15: Hurriedly taking bath to try 
and make it to Sunday School. 

9:45: In Sunday school and peo- 
ple are wondering what kind of 
"binge" I've been on. 

Noon: Insist on taking familv out 
to lunch and we can at least be to- 



gether. Run into a client that has 
been meaning to tell me for a week 
to cancel. He can't wait until the 
next day because he knows I won't 
mind talking now. He pulls up a 
chair and takes most of the meal time 
chatting. The family can wait. 

1:30: \^e leave the eating place 
for home. I remember that I was to 
meet the electrician at 1:00. Hurrv 
to the transmitter. He is gone. Call 
him back. He is angry, and does not 
want to return. Finally persuade him. 
We shut the station down at 2:00 and 
at 4:00 have the repair wiring in. 
Hurr\ back to change programing. 
make up lost spots, etc. ^ 




PUT THEM ALL TO- 
GETHER AND THEY 
SPELL CHANNEL 10, 
WSLS-TV IN ROANOKE, 
VIRGINIA. PUT THEM 

TOGETHER 5 

COUNTY MARKET, TO- 
TAL TV HOMES, 448,000. 
THE PEOPLE IN THESE 
58 COUNTIES BUY THE 
PRODUCTS ADVERTISED 
ON WSLS-TV. 




TELEVISION 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES, 
BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 




WHITE ROSE 

I Continued from page 41 i 

The agency has found that m 
mum penetration in New York v> 
W.R.'s budget is reached with i 
or five stations. The allocation 
radio during a flight ranges beta 
$2,000 and $4,000 per week. In 
two-station holding campaigns. \fc 
spends from $500 to SI. 000 a > 

\ ou won't find much uniform 
from one W.R. flight lineup to 
other. For instance, the Janut 
into-Februarv hot tea drive was • 
ried by WCBS, WINS. WM- 
WMGM and WNEW, onlv 
which are in the current flight, 
cept where continuity is sought. 
W.R. approach is to "get a segn 
of the adult radio audience andj 
our story a sufficient number of t; 
to make it take hold," in the j 
of a.e. Ed Ridley. Then for a s 
quent flight W.R. seeks to exterc 
reacrr.via other stations, provided 
audiences and availabilities meet 
requirements. 

Even within a given flight thei 
diversity in that for budgetary 
sons all stations aren't nece«-< 
used over the entire period, 
again selectivity is substituted 
saturation. Stations considered 
vital may get a shorter turn, 
method being to pair off two of I 
so there is a week or two of ove 
Focal point in the W.R. copy tl 
is its blending process. "Anyone 
buy tea leaves, any kind, any 
asserts W. R. in what seems a re 
tion of a competitors I Tetley I 
point about leaf size. "It's the B 
you perform with them, how 
blend them, that makes the pe 
cup of tea." the theme conti 
"White Rose knows that seen 
magic blending. That's why 
Rose is the tea with the fahi 
flavor." To deliver this messa:_<| 
R. developed two characters, a I 
fessor and his female assistant..* 
These characters appear inl 
mated form, he turbaned. she inl 
in \^ .R.'s tv spots which run '14 
flights but not in the sustaining « 
paigns. For the current flight I 
20's and I.D.'s. a total of ab.J 
per week, are on WCBS-TY: ii 
WNEW-TV is carrying the -an eii 
ture of spot-lengths, totaling .o 
12 a week. The tv adjacencies 
primarily daytime programs, w ajp 
by women, and high-rated adul:J| 
ence nighttime shows. * 



SPONSOR • 16 apri: 




Compliments by the sackful ! 



Across our desk come letters of honest and 



before have I enjoyed watching television 



our mail, is more impressive, we think, 
than any rating picture could be. 



sincere praise like the letter from the Navy |NJ=3 as much." The satisfaction of our viewers, 
wife who wrote: "Your station has always af- C as expressed by the volume and content of 

forded the finest entertainment ... we have ^^ 
lived in many parts of the country and never G~l 

Reputed by 
( Ed wardYpetry i Yc° ., Inc.) 

CHANNEL 10 • COCK-OF-THE-WALK IN THE PROVIDENCE MARKET 



NSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



ou 



ON/s/ 



LJ 



AOAir^j J 



u 



W ©'r 




ft 



o o 



sisfh-t a*r^ol sound 



see ■y-oij.r katz man 




tne golcien lc network 
"w-ionita. *- ■ m ensign 



Whafs happening in V. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



A hot Federal Power Commission trail and the persistent "payola" scent now ap- 
pear to have almost completely eliminated the possibility of the more far-reaching 
broadcasting legislative proposals for this year. 

The Dick Clark payola show finally goes on the road, starting 26 April, with over 20 wit- 
nesses on the schedule to appear before the Harris Legislative Overnight Subcommittee. If 
any newsworthy revelations are forthcoming this phase could break the bounds of the single 
week allotted and could run into May. 

Already postponed indefinitely are hearings on bills to require that the FCC regulate 
networks as it now does individual stations, and to present bars to quick and easy 
sales of stations. Early May would be the first possible time for the start of such hearings. 
Late May would be more likely. 

Adjournment of this Congress is set for the early days of July. Even if passing legisla- 
tion is not passed by that time and a special session does become necessary, no controversial 
items like network regulation will be handled. 

All of this amounts to almost an ironclad guarantee that most of the far-reaching recom- 
mendations in the broadcasting report of the Harris House Commerce Legislative Oversight 
subcommittee will go over until next year. 

That, in turn, would mean that any hearings held in the remainder of this session on 
specific bills would have to be required all over again next year. This is the final year of the 
86th Congress, and all bills not passed by the end of the session will die automatic- 
ally. 

Purely procedural bills, such as pre-grant hearing procedures to take the place 
of post-grant protests in non-hearing cases, will likely be passed by the House. 

The Senate passed four such bills last year, so House approval would send the measures to 
the White House. 

The House Commerce Committee could conceivably approve and manage to get through 
the House, with Senate passage also possible, bills to carry out FCC recommendations for 
criminal penalties for payola, plugola and quiz show rigging. 

The FCC has not only approved ideas very much like those under consideration, but there 
isn't any real opposition. Mostly, they would apply criminal penalties to actions by sta- 
tion employees, whom the FCC can't reach under present law. 

The idea of temporary license suspension as a lesser penalty for station wrong- 
doing — the "death penalty" of license revocation is now the only penalty the FCC can exact 
— seems somewhat more controversial. As such, it probably will not pass in the limited time left 
in this session, despite the fact that the Harris subcommittee favored it and the FCC asks for 



Most of the new crusading actions at both FTC and FCC are the direct result of 
Harris pressure. 

This pressure will be just as strong during the Congressional recess, encompassing this 
year both political conventions and November elections. 

Kintner became FTC chairman as a part of the Attorney General Rogers-Vice President 
Nixon drive to counteract Harris revelations. Ford replaced Doerfer as part of the same scheme. 
The direction for both bureaus has been set. New legislation or none, broadcasting and ad 
agencies will be kept busy trying to keep changes at these bureaus from getting out 
of hand. 



• 16 APRIL 1960 






*» FILM-SCOPE 



16 APRIL I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



There's been quite a bit of new sponsor money in syndication in the last 
months, chiefly in the automotive, tobacco, food and beer fields. 

The new spenders who have come into syndication appear to have more than < 
losses from advertisers such as Schlitz which gave up syndication recently. 

Here's a checklist of new syndication advertisers, and the shows they're using, in 
key product areas: 

PRODUCT ADVERTISER 

Automotive: Studebaker dealers (D'Arcy) 



Renault (N,L&B) 

Volkswagen (D-D-B) 
Tobacco: Duke (McCann-Erickson) 

Consolidated Cigar (EWR&R) 
Food: General Foods (B & B) 

Quaker Oats (JWT) 
Beer: Jax Beer (DCS&S) 



SHOW 

Four Just Men (ITC) 

& Tombstone Territory (Ziv) 
Four Just Men (ITC) 
Four Just Men (ITC) 
Sea Hunt (Ziv) 
Home Run Derby (Ziv) 
Fury (ITC) 
Alcoa-Goodyear re-runs (Screen Gems) 
Manhunt (Screen Gems) 

& Shotgun Slade (MCA) 



Amoco (Jos. Katz) has switched its syndication budget from a single regid 
deal to a station-by-station buying formula. 

The refiner has about completed its shopping for alternate weeks in most of the i 
which were covered last season in one regional buy. 

Amoco's strategy is this: Buy ratings results in the best syndication availabili 
which stations have to offer in each market. 

Before last season Amoco was a long-time network user with a regional network on 
TV's Person to Person; then it entered syndication via a 59 market buy of CBS Films' I 
Border Patrol, but there'll be no additional production of this series. 



Mary Jane candy (Charles N. Miller Co.) scored a 90% increase in Boston 
tail sales through just two months' use of UAA's cartoon series, Big Mac, 
WHDH-TV, Boston. 

The candy firm sponsors the show from 10:00-10:30 a.m. Saturdays and has tied 
massive consumer and trade promotion. 

Video tape was used for the commercials, which WHDH-TV produced, utilizing 
animated and live approaches. 

WNTA-TV, New York, has introduced a tape programing block built up aro 
Play of the Week, which it originates. 

Columbia Records purchased a five-minute show video tape called Playback to fop 
each Play of the Week telecast. 

CBS Films began production of 36 Maiden Lane this week. 

The series about an insurance investigator reflects a revised interest in production 
location in and around New York City. 



56 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL '. 



- 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The estrangement of the syndicators and the NAB, which became pronounced 
in 1959, was seriously aggravated this year. 

Up to two years ago the film section of tine NAB convention was one of the most attrac- 
tive and colorful spots in the meetings. 

This month for the second straight year syndicators had only hospitality suites in scat- 
tered locations at hotels. 

This treatment has thrown the syndicators into three groups: 

1) Network arms, such as ABC Films, CBS Films and CNP, which are going along with 
parent policies and are expressing no special opinions of their own regarding the NAB 
convention. 

2) Syndicators like MCA and MGM with primarily network interests, which regard the 
convention as mainly social, and not a real opportunity for selling. 

3) The remaining syndicators, many of which have thrown up their hands in disgust 
at the NAB, and which may withdraw entirely in the future rather than continue to 
participate half-way. 

Station men in some cases are even angrier than the syndicators themselves: Many, after 
traveling 1,000 miles, have lost a chance to discuss local film problems face-to-face with 
top syndication executives. 

One syndication executive said: "What's more important at the convention — to discuss 
film programing or the height of station towers?" 



an 



COMMERCIALS 



Robert Lawrence took a blast at gimmicks and the bidding system in commer- 
cials in an open letter to the trade this week. 

He pointed out that advertisers are spending only 7% of their tv budgets in commercials 
— $100 million out of SI. 5 billion in tv in 1959 — and that even this amount could be put to 
better use. 

Today commercials cost 75% more than they did 10 years ago, chiefly because 
of the increased costs of labor and materials. 

However, Lawrence trained his sights on gimmicks, photogenic license, near-deception, 
and cramming as much talk as possible into each spot. He held up creativity for praise. 

Lawrence complained that through the biddings system a producer is "chosen for his 
price, not his merit." He argued that creativity costs money and that the bidding method 
hampers use of the best talents. 

He made a plea for an end to "jazzy substitutes that cost as much as, and sometimes 
more than, the real thing." 



A group of 50 distinguished advertising executives have been named as a Tv 
Commercials Council to judge the forthcoming festival in May in New York City. 

Council members represent many major advertisers and a large percentage of important 
agencies. 

Although the festival will hold its events in New York, council members have been selected 
from many other key advertising centers. 

Two announcements regarding procedures of the festival have been made: Commercials 
will be accepted on video tape, and the entry deadline has been extended to Friday, 22 April. 

(For more details, see p. 32, this issue.) 



• 16 APRIL 1960 



57 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



PUBLICATIONS INC. 



SPONSOR HEARS 



Typical of the Hollywood stars' attitude toward tv is the basic reason for the 
blowup in the negotiations by Colgate (Bates) for a Fred MacMurray series. 

MacMurray's plan is to get the season's episodes in the can within three months. 
This, naturally, would preclude required changes in characters and story lines a 

the weaknesses of the undertaking became manifest. 

The series would have been a successor to the Millionaire. 



Looks like General Mills' ad staff is headed for a shakeup. 

One of the reported sparks: the dissatisfactory results obtained by the cakemix opera- 
tion from the several tv specials this season. 



If pressure from the Government or the talent unions forces the MCA empire 
to divest itself of either production or talent representation, the odds are that th< 
spinoff will be the talent agency. 

The relative income from the two operations, as revealed in MCA's first public financial 
statement, makes it easy to see where the choice will be. (See page 22, 26 March SPONSOR! 
SCOPE.) 

You may recall an item in SPONSOR HEARS some months ago about a client 1 
found it easier to change agencies than replace a faltering sales manager. 

Well, that sales manager — who blamed the advertising for his troubles — has just beei 
replaced. 

Rep salesmen that cover Ted Bates figure that here's one agency that they ca 
make a full time job of, if so inclined. 

The Bates philosophy in spot is never to consider a buy frozen, but to keep on t 
lookout for an improved cost-per-thousand. 

Hence a salesman, if he's got an especially attractive availability, can always expect I 
get a hearing on any active campaign at Bates. 



For reps the NAB convention this time added up to a fairly sublime climate. 

Generally speaking, there was very little heckling and griping by stations, and tho: 
reps who put on special presentations for their flock encountered a goodly percentage < 
attendance and gratifying level of enthusiasm. 

On the social side, the air of comraderie couldn't have been more sweeping. 



An agency's sharply fluctuating billings produces the toughest impact on to 
grade people who are shackled to the shop because their savings are invested I 
company stock. 

The fact that at the moment they'd have to take a severe clipping in their equity ft 
quently dissuades them from accepting attractive outside offers. 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 19B 




W&fiZs, 



Mother's biggest helper. . .THE NEW WCOL 



What stores are featuring what items? 
Where are today's biggest values to be 
found? Who's having a sale? What new 
products should I introduce to my family 
. . . my household? 

The modern Columbus, Ohio, Housewife 
gets the best and most answers to these 
questions from the New WCOL! Even the 
course of her weekly shopping trip is 

24-hours-a-day broadcasting 1230 AM 92.3 



often planned with the aid of WCOL 
weather broadcasts. 

Pulse, Hooper and Nielsen prove that 
today's Columbus housewife, listens most 
to the station that helps her most. The 
New WCOL. 

That's why no sales campaign is com- 
plete without the new sell of the New 
WCOL ... Columbus' Sound of the Sixties! 
FM 



THE CAPITAL STATION 
COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 



represented nationally by: robert e. eastman & CO., mo. CE0J$) 

Station WING, Dayton; WEZE, Boston; WKL0\ Louisville, and 
WIZE, Springfield, 0., are other AIR TRAILS stations. 



Ij'ONSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



■ 



NEWS & IDEA 

! WRAP-UP 



WASHINGTON PARTY-GOERS— National Press Club Congressional Night in Washington, 
grouped an interesting combination, namely (l-r) Speaker of House Sam Rayburn, ABC TV stars 
Connie Stevens, Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., singer Dorothy Sarnoff and Senator Lyndon B. Johnson 




ADVERTISERS 



Looks like General Mills' ca> 
mix division (BBDO) will unli 
ber another saturation campal 
this summer on CBS Radio. 

expenditure for this will run aron 
$300,000. 

Campaigns: 

• Thomas J. Lipton, Inc. | 

week introduces, nationally, its i 
Lipton Instant Tea. The campa 
described as a multi-million dc 
promotion, will center around 9 
radio, prime nighttime network 
(Father Knows Best will be kickd 
and tv spots in a minimum of 80 1 
kets. Agency: SSCB. 

• Fradelis Frozen Foods 
feature its 12 dinners as well as j 
new Dunk 'n Dine main courses j 
a concentrated spot and participal 
schedule on KTTV, Los Angt 
Some 12 Southern California rt 
stations will back up the sale of tl 
Fradelis items and will be used 
promote two new household pre 



PHYSICAL CULTURE, exuded and taught by well-rounded Debbie Drake, is the highlight of 
WISH-TV's (Indianapolis) "Passport to Beauty" show. Though geared to women, program draws 
considerable male interest, as evidenced by many requests for Debbie to speak at men's clubs 



EGGING HER ON! 

people in Tampa 



These Fairyland 
d WFLA-TV's "R< 
teacher Miss Kay, as she seeks 
ing places for the station's annual Easter 
hunt — eagerly awaited by scores of young 




NO PLACE LIKE SPACE, except 
WHAT's studios, according to d.j. Hot I 
whose Philadelphia arrival via h 
was greeted by station's (l-r) Bill Cii 
Mary Dee, Mary Mason and Lloyd "Fatir 

16 APRIL 1! 



■Jew product : two new potato prod- 
cts from General Mills — Betty 



Crocker Scalloped Potatoes and Betty 
Crocker Au Gratin Potatoes — will 
soon be available in selected intro- 
ductory markets. Spot tv will be used 
throughout the introductory period. 
Agency: Knox Reeves. 

Financial report: American To- 
bacco Co. reports dollar sales during 
the first quarter appears certain to set 
a new all-time high. Net income dur- 
ing the first two months of 1960 also 
was higher than the corresponding 
1959 period. 

The Chicago Area Agricultural 
Advertising Association will hold 
a seminar for top executives in all 
phases of manufacturing ior farm 
market, as well as their agencies and 
farm radio stations. 

Set for 2 May at the Drake Ho- 
tel in Chicago, this seminar will be 
devoted entirely to the marketing 
and advertising problems of a 
changing agricultural economy. 

Among the scheduled speakers: J. 
E. Streetman, v.p., Ralston Purina; 
W. D. Tyler, executive v.p., B&B; 



and Sam Schneider, midwest man- 
ager, CBS Spot Sales. 

Strictly personnel: W.E.S. Gris- 
wold Jr., appointed director of cor- 
porate development of Lever Bros. . . . 
Robert Haag, promoted to national 
sales manager, retail division, and 
Charles Pratt, to advertising man- 
ager, the Alberto-Culver Co. 



AGENCIES 



Agency appointments: Pepsi- 
Cola, billing $13 million, from K&E 
to BBDO . . . Sofskin, Inc., billing 
$500,000, with a planned network 
radio and spot tv campaign, to Kas- 
tor, Hilton, Chesley, Clifford & 
Atherton . . . The newlv-created Dow 
Chemical division, Dow Industrial 
Service, to MacManus, John & 
Adams . . . The Plymouth Dealers 
Association of Greater St. Louis, to 
French Advertising, St. Louis . . . 
WMAR-TV, Baltimore, to Newhoff- 
Blumberg Advertising, Baltimore 
. . . Dakota Sales-Makers iKVOX, 



■■ II 



EW HOME, for John Blair & Co., an I I -story building under con- 
on Chicago's Michigan Ave., was visited during the NAB 
i by (l-r) Harry Smart, v.p. Blair-TV, Chic; Ed Shurick, exec 
TV, N.Y.; Bob Thomas, sis. dir. WBNS-TV, Col., O.; John Blair 




'IP CONCLAVE at 38th annual NAB convention in Chicago last week 
ncluded (l-r) Christian Herter, Secretary of State; Frank Stanton, pres., 
^BS; Clair McCollough of the Steinman stations, who was keynoter 





BAIT FOR CHANNEL EIGHT, in shape of donuts, resulted from or 
WSIX-TV (Nashville) thinking man who ordered goodies for agencie 
Station's Mickey Martin (I) with admen Bill Dillon (c), Joe Andrev 



Fargo-Moorhead; KBOM, Bismarck- 
Vlandan; KSJB, Jamestown; KCJB, 
Minot; and KRAD, Grand Forks) to 
Dean & Slaughter, Minneapolis . . . 
Eatwell Provision, Inc.. processor of 
Nopoli brand Italian style meat spe- 
cialties, with a planned radio/tv cam- 
paign, to Weiss & Geller, New York. 

New quarters: Tatham-Laird will 
move its New York offices to 444 
Madison Avenue to accomodate a 
fullv departmentalized and expanded 
staff. 

Thisa 'n' data: F. C. Miller, execu- 
tive v.p. of Bozell & Jacobs. Omaha, 
honored as Advertising Man of the 
Year by the Omaha Advertising Clubs 
. . . Cargill, Wilson & Acree, 
Richmond, Va. last week celebrated 
its 10th anniversary and the formal 
opening of its expanded office build- 
ing .. . The Women's Advertising 
Club of Chieago meets this week 
(19 April) to hear a talk by Emily 
Taft Douglas, and to select the Chi- 
cago Advertising Woman of the Year 
for 1960. 

Admen on the move: Howard 
Axelberg, named executive v.p. of 
Liller, Neal, Battle & Lindsey, Inc. . . . 
Dr. Virginia Miles and Stephen 
Richards, to v.p.'s of the McCann- 
Marschalk Co. . . . Ira Avery and 
Alexander Cantwell, elected v.p.'s 
of BBDO . . . Julian Pace, to v.p. of 
Ted Bates . . . Edward Gallagher, 
to v.p. at Compton . . . Anthony De- 
Pierro, to Geyer. Morey. Madden & 
Ballard as v.p. . . . Jerry Sachs, to 
media director in the Los Angeles of- 
fice of Doyle Dane Bernbach . . . Ray 
Hunter, to media director of the 
Pittsburgh office of BBDO . . . Robert 



McMahon, to account supervisor in 
the Pittsburgh office of Fuller & Smith 
& Ross. 

Add to personnel news: Dwight 
Reynolds, to media supervisor, and 
Rosemarie Bramel, timebuyer, 
Wade Advertising . . . Walter Stone, 

to account executive at Compton . . . 
Lucian Douglas Jr., to account ex- 
ecutive at Simcock Advertising, New 
Orleans . . . John Twiddy, to buyer 
in the media department of Mac- 
Manus, John & Adams . . . John 
Goshen, to account executive at Nor- 
man, Craig & Kummel . . . Arnold 
Deutschman, elected assistant v.p. 
of Ted Bates . . . Ken Jensen, to 
publicity and sales promotion at 
Honig-Cooper & Harrington, Los 
Angeles . . . Robert Bassindale, 
to a group creative supervisor at 
Tatham-Laird, Chicago . . . Frances 
Marotta, to media director for Moss 
Associates, New York . . . Norman 
Kangas and David Garrett, to ac- 
count executives at Baker/Johnson & 
Dickinson, Milwaukee. 



EQUIPMENT 



Ampex caused some excitement 
at the NAB Convention with its 
new Inter-Sync. 

By use of this signal synchronizer, 
videotape can now do anything film 
can do — lap — dissolve or wipe from 
tape to live, from live to tape, film to 
tape, or tape to tape, all without splic- 
ing or waiting. 

Use of the synchronizer is not con- 
fined to program production or com- 
mercials, since it makes possible syn- 
chronizing a single VTR to station 
sync, thus permitting the station 



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Very Important p 

The greatest star-name package 

ever offered to television! 



u"i ^ALEXANDER PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



ICTURES 

ERSONALITIES 

RODUCT 



to cut, wipe or lap-dissolve from) 
any program into local tape. Itl 

also ends all danger of complaints! 
from local advertisers about picture] 
rollover when going into a tapedl 
commercial insert. 

The significance of this new Air 
pex technique: Videotape is now 
equal to the flexibility of film foi 
all purposes. 



Some new RCA equipment devel- 
opments introduced at the Con- 
vention : 

• The RCA Tv automation sysi 
tern, to handle tv broadcasting situa- 
tions ranging from a station break 
to round-the-clock operation, and 
geared to handle switching and equip- 
ment control. It's a perforated paper 
tape prepared when the progran} 
schedule for the day is formulated. 
and inserted in a tape "reader" ir 
the station control room. 

• A new monochrome tv studic 
camera with a larger image 41/oh 
inch pickup tube for high-quality 
"live" tv broadcasting or tape record- 
ing copies of uniform clarity. Thi^ 
pickup tube is designed to plav an 
important role in the use of magnetic 
tape recording producing pictures ( 
increased resolution and better gra) 
scale rendition than the standard 3 
inch studio camera tube. 

• A newly-developed electronic 
editing unit, added to the RCA tape 
recorder, which, with its frame-loci 
module, wil lenable the tape produce: 
to employ any of the video effecti 
used in live tv or film production. 

Gates Radio Co., a subsidiary 
Harris-Intertype Corp., has devel 
oped a new cartridge tape systen 
designed to reproduce announce 
ments, production aids, themes 
and the top tunes of the weel 
from programing material re 
corded on a single cartridge. 

In the operation of the new system 
"Cartritape." any number of com 
mercials and themes may be recordec 
on a cartridge until the tape is com 
pletelv filled. Segments may be 



WNJR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



• 16 APRIL 19CC 



viort as a second or as long as 46 
rinutes. The unit may be stopped 
nd started between syllables without 
oticeable wow. 



Official Films' new management 
tas issued a report on the first 
wo months of its administration. 

Its salient points are these: 
1 • Overhead and operating ex- 
tenses have been cut at a rate that 
Vill save $250,000 a year. 

• The sales force has been re- 
amped. making a prediction of in- 
reased sales possible. 

Although Official does not expect to 
how a profit for the fiscal vear end- 
ng in June, it does anticipate profits 
n coming months to balance out past 



Sales: Ziv-UA's Home Run Derby to 
rStudebaker dealers (Price & Price) 
j>n KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh: Galles 
Motor (Galbe & Assoc.) on KOAT- 
CV, Albuquerque; Armour on KXLY- 
TV. Spokane; Foremost Dairies on 
SCFDM-TV, Beaumont: Household 
finance of Holyoke in Boston; KPTV. 

fortland: WDBJ-TV. Roanoke; 
7JTV, Jackson; and WCTV. Talla- 
CBS Films' Twilight Zone 
ho Australia (ABC) . . . Fremantle 
International has sold a group of 
films to a new station in Brasilia, 
the new Brazilian capital. TV-Alvora- 
da. 

More sales: MCA's Johnny Mid- 

\night to Chef Milani foods, Roth 

IjPacking Co., Wultex Clothing, Arm- 

JflOur, Crosby Milling. Golden Flake 

L (Frank M. Taylor), Liggett & Myers, 

HChilds Big Chain Foods, R. J. Rey- 

Lnolds, and Amoco gasoline; also 

h Shot gun Slade to Amoco, R. J. Rey- 

i nolds, and Blue Plate Foods, and 

,\Coronado 9 to Amoco and R. J. 

Reynolds. Individual markets and 

i call letters were not disclosed. 

| Trade note : Official Film's new man- 
agement reports cutting overhead and 
operating expenses at the rate of 
S250.000 annually, and is optimistic 
on profit chances for the second half 
of this vear. 

Programs: Morton Productions 

of Chicago will distribute Ten-Tuen- 

SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



ty, a pocket billiards competition pro- 
gram. 

Production: Dennis M. Kennedy 
and Raymond J. Christensen have 
incorporated their film studios in 
Omaha, Nebraska, for authorized 
capital of $100,000. 

Strictly personnel: Robert M. 
Weitman named tv production v.p. 
of MGM . . . Worthington Miner 

becomes executive producer for The 
Play of the Week Co., a new division 
of NTA . . . Alwin D. L. Zecha 



appointed Asian Sales manager of 
Screen Gems . . . David Sontag be- 
comes New York program manager 
of CBS Films . . . Gilbert Haim- 
sohn appointed production manager 
for Magna Film Productions of 
Watertown, Mass. 



NETWORKS 



Network tv sales: Scott Paper Co. 

(JWT), to sponsor a new situation 
comedy series, Bringing Up Buddy, 
on CBS TV, Mondays, 8:30-9 p.m., 



LUCKY BRINGING YOU 
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Engineered to cover Eastern 
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Hampshire and Vermont 
with the ABC Network. 



call your 



«**HR 



SABLE 
714.560 EYES and EARS 

In the Rich Rochester Area ! 




We're very happy to tell you that, 
based on the latest Nielsen Report 
for the Rochester Area (November 
1959), Channel 10 focuses no less 
than 714,560 beautiful eyes on 
your sales message afternoons from 
noon to 6:00 P.M. — and an equal 
number of dainty and attentive ears! 

Based on the same Nielsen Report, 
Channel 10 focuses 689,040 eyes and 
ears on your sales message every 
evening, from 6:00 P.M. to Mid- 
night, seven days a week! 

In other words, Channel 10 offers 
you 56% of the TV viewers in the 
Rochester area, afternoons — and 
54% of the Rochester area viewers 
every evening! 

SO — if you want the majority of 
viewers and listeners in the Roch- 
ester area to see and hear about 
your product, your best buy, now 
as always, is Channel 10! 




^, 



CHANNEL lO 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

CBS BASIC (WVET-TV • WHEC-TV) ABC AFFILIATE 



THE B0LLING CO.. INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES EVERETT-McKINNEY INC. 



next season. Father Knous Best, n;nv|. 
in that time slot, moves to Tuesday j ■ 
8-8:30 p.m. in September, partly fori 
Scott . . . Miles Labs (Wade) and] jj 
R. J. Reynolds (Esty) to co-spon- 
sor The Flintstones, situation comedy) 
series to air this fall on ABC TV Fri- 
days, 8:30-9 p.m. . . . Block Drug ' 
I Grey I . for alternate weeks on People , 
Are Funny, beginning 4 May on NBC 
TV and running through 7 September 
. . . P&G (Grey), for The Jeannie] j 
Carson Show, to bow on ABC TV 
Thursday, 30 June, 9-9:30 p.m. 

Network tv renewals: Pet Milk! 

Co. (Gardner), for alter nate-weeka 
of the Red Skelton Show over CBS 
TV Tuesdays, 9:30-10 p.m., starting; 
27 September . . . Carter (SSCBi,j 
for participations on American Band-\ 
stand, ABC TV. 

Network programing note: Barry 
Sullivan will star in a new half-hour 
Western series. The Tall Man. to be> 
presented as a nighttime feature oni 
NBC TV during the 1960-61 season. 

New affiliate: KSOO-TV. Sioux, 
Falls, S. D., to NBC TV. The station; 
is expected to go on the air this 
summer. 

Kudos: To John Gunther's High 
Road, on ABC TV, the 1960 Spot- 
light on Education award of the| 
North American Newspaper Alliana 

Personnel notes: Carl Lindeman,; 

davtime programing v. p. at NBC TV , 
promoted to v.p., for program sales 
. . . Joseph Keating, Mutual Net- 
work v.p. in charge of programs and 
operations, named to the radio/tv 
committee for the 1960 United Fund 
and Community Chest campaign. 



RADIO STATIONS 



NAB Convention sidelights: 

1 ) Progress, it seems, has been 
made in the fm field. Operators of 
such stations from all over the coun- 
try gave some glowing local success 
stories, which are significant because 
fm has to prove itself at the local 
level before it can expect to attract 
much national business. 

2) The National Association of 
Fm Broadcasters is still very much 
interested in exploring further the 



SPONSOR • 16 APRIL 196' )■ 



Bsibilities of working actively 
th RAB to sell the medium. But at 
; moment, the NAFMB is holding 
t for selling fm as a separate entity 
,not just as radio as RAB wants to 
V If this one detail can be ironed 
t, the fm'ers and RAB could work 
rid in hand. 

B) Other hopeful signs for fm: 
n listenership is now beginning 
show up in both Hooper and 
ilse surveys. And New York and 
icago agencies both sent their re- 
irch people to the Convention to 
ing back data on fm. 

*eas at work: 

^« Spot the goof contest: Some 
^,000 listeners entered the one-dav 
tpril Fool Goof" contest on WIP, 
'liladelphia. The idea: Following a 
e-week air promotion, station of- 
ed prizes to listeners spotting each 
14 intentional "goofs." irregularly 
aced, one an hour, for 14 hours on 
April. 

• April Fool stunts — contin- 
:d: WVOX, Mt. Kisco, N. Y., did 
iswitch and called it April Fun Dav. 
mmick was a give-away contest for 
'51 Ford from a local dealer. Win- 
r had to guess the station's price 
|'r it— from 10 to $50 . . . WING, 
ayton, April fooled its audience by 
jaying the top hits from the 1 April 
'59 hits-of-the-week list. 

!• Welcoming committee: To 

jtroduce a new air personality to the 
•tening audience. WAPI, Birming- 

hm, staged a party for him at the 
rport, attracting some 5,000 Ala- 
imans. Station aired a three and 
le-half hour broadcast direct from 
j remote unit parked at the airport, 

tfth all the personalities sharing the 
honors, and with a local high 

ihool band filling in the background 
usic. 

• An unusual source of ad 
venue: KPHO, Phoenix, is corn- 
lying with the FCC edict requiring 
jations to identify donors of records 

rnished for program use, but with 
is added feature: station sold the 
ore than 30 such announcements 
;r day to a local real estate dealer. 



WNJR 

1st in new york 
dec. negro pulse 



The purchase comes to more than 200 
announcements per week at the rate 
of $35,000 a year. 

Station acquisitions: KNGS, Han- 
ford, Cal., to John Cohan, president 
of Salinas Broadcasting Co. (KSBW- 
AM-FM-TV, Salinas; KSBY-TV, San 
Luis Obispo) and owner of KVEC, 
San Luis Obispo, for $360,000, bro- 
kered by Hamilton-Landis & Associ- 
ates . . . WAPL, Appleton, Wis., to 
the John Dixons of Rockford, 111., 
for $163,000. 



Thisa 'n' data: KFI, Los Angeles, 
will air the Dodger games for Dual 
Filter Tareyton, Roi-Tan Cigars, and 
the Union Oil Co. of Southern Cal. 
. . . R. Peter Straus, president of 
WMCA, New York, has been appoint- 
ed chairman of the over-all commit- 
tee for Deborah Hospital Month in 
May . . . Anniversary note: WOW, 
Omaha, last week celebrated its 37th 
birthday. 

Kudos: KEWB, San Francisco, win- 
( Please turn to page 68) 









§J 




14 


t 






{ 


9| 


y 




\ 
> 

1 


WF 


BM-TV 


more 


m 


an 


doubles 


your 


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"% 




~ ^ 





For every 10 "food dollars" spent 
in Indianapolis Trading Area . . . 
there are $13 spent in its Satellite 
Markets. 

Call us . . . find out why this big 
Mid-Indiana television market is 
different! 

Where else will you find satellite 
markets that are 15% richer and 30% 
bigger than the metropolitan trading 
zone itself ... or such a widespread area 
covered by just one station with no over- 
lapping basic affiliates of the same net- 
work! 

WFBM-TV dominate Mid-Indi- 
ana, because it is the only basic NBC 
outlet penetrating this market. N.C.S. 
No. 3 confirms these facts . . . and we'll 
back this up with county-by-county 
retail sales figures for market planning. 
Let us show you how to test regional 
marketing ideas with amazing results. 

America's 13th TV Market 

. . . with the only basic NBC coverage 
of 760,000 TV set owning families. 



«lfP."°° Indianapolis — Major retail 
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1,000,000 population— 350,600 families with 
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11 Satellites — Bach market 
within WFBM-TV's verified coverage . . . 
Marion • Anderson • Muncie • Blooming- 
ton • Vincennes • Terre Haute • Lafayette 
• Danville, Illinois • Peru • Logansport • 
Kokomo. 
Represented Nationally by the KATZ agency 




OF LEADERSHIP 



'ONSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



' 




every time buyer 
'reads 



sp° n 



SOB 



BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency/advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS— listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any other 
book in the field. 



SPONSOR 

sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 



WRAP-UP 

{Continued from page 65 I 

ner of the "Public Interest Award" 
of the National Safety Council . . . 
To WINS, New York, a certificate in 
recognition of its cooperation with 
the fire department from Mayor Rob- 
ert Wagner ... To all Oklahoma 
am and fm stations, a tribute from 
the Governor for its contributions to 
the communities, in honor of Radio 
Month. 

Station staffers: Robert Hoth. 

promoted to executive v.p. of Public 
Radio Corp. (KIOA, Des Moines; 
KBKC, Kansas City; and KAKC, Tul- 
sa) ... David Gordon and Read 
Wight, to v.p.'s of WPAT, Patterson, 
N. J. . . . Victor Simon, to general 
manager, and Frank Sanzo, to sales 
manager of KMGM, Albuquerque . . . 
Sumner Pearl, to sales manager 
of WFYI, Garden City, L. I. . . . 
Fred von Hofen, to head national 
sales at KOL, Seattle . . . Al Grosby, 
to sales manager of WYSL-AM-FM, 
Buffalo . . . Jim Uglum, to man- 
ager and Ron Titus, to sales man- 
ager of KUTT, Fargo . . . Michael 
Drechsler, to director of sales pro- 
motion for WKNB. Hartford . . . 
Don Gilman, to account executive 
with KOIL. Omaha . . . Dan Milli- 
ken, to account executive at WCKY, 
Cincinnati . . . Frank Armstrong, 
to assistant national sales manager of 
WDIA, Memphis. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



The only re-shuffling of station 
representation at the NAB Con- 
vention : 

ll The Todd Storz New Orleans 



station, WTIX, to Robert E. East- 
man. This move eliminates Adam 
Young from the Storz lineup com- 
pletely. 

2) But Young did pick up, 
WXIX-TV, Milwaukee, which was 
formerly repped by Gil Perna. 

Indication of spot growth in the 
midwest: PGW is opening an office 
in St. Louis. With this move, St. 
Louis now has a full house, with every 
major rep firm in business there. 

According to a survey by Edward 
Petry & Co., its represented ra- 
dio and tv stations donated more 
than $22.6 million in time and 
talent to public service during 
1959. 

The largest single total for am of 
the public service categories was the 
$2.9 million contributed to Civic 
Groups. Religion was the second larg- 
est beneficiary and projects of the 
Advertising Council, the third. 

During 1959 the survey shows that 
on the average the Petry-represented 
stations contributed more than 1,000 
announcements a day, a total of 389,- 
706 for the year. These same sta- 
tions also planned, broadcast and tele- 
cast 45,994 public service programs 
last year — nearly 900 public interest 
show ? s rer week. 

Rep appointments: The McLen- 
don Corp.'s WYSL. Buffalo, to Daren 
F. McGavren Co WCUM. Cum- 
berland, Md., and WEEZ, Chester. 
Pa., to Philadelphia Spot Sales as 
a regional rep . . . WEAN, Provi- 
dence, to Kettell-Carter, Boston, as 
New England rep. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 



New, exciting- 

musie 

nso 



devivre 




Pete Watkins, to the New York 
sales staff of PGW . . . Peter Princj | 

to the New York sales staff of Broat 
cast Time Sales . . . Joseph Paynl 
to the tv department in the New Yo , 
office of the George P. Hollingbe 
Co. . . . John Rohrbach, Jr., to t! [ 
sales staff of NBC TV Spot Sale 
Central Division . . . Don Saracen^ 
to assistant sales manager of Blai I 
TV, Chicago. 



TV STATIONS 



Tv Personal Interviews, Inc., w 
go into the field 24 April for 
planned week of interviewii 
that will cover all network nigl) 
time programing. 

In the second of its surveys, 1] 
will conduct personal interviews 
the room where tv is being view 
while the program is on the air. F 
sponses are observed and record) 
as they occur on special IBM Pol 
A-Punch cards. 

What the TPI data will cover: d 
gree of viewer involvement 
program; audience composition; ? 
dience exposure to other mediui 
advertising awareness of viewe* 
brand usaee: number of sets-in- 
and the like. 

(For TPI story, see page 42.) 

All out for color: KMTV, OnJ 
ha, and the Sidles Co., a RCA d 

tributor, this past week telecast 
full day (17 hours) in full cob 

The campaign followed a week-lo 
promotion with a heavy Sidles s] 
tv schedule and a tie-in for the lo 
color set dealers to remain open 
the day of the telecast. 



Ideas at work: 

• A mapped -out promotio 

Capitalizing on the current inter 
in world affairs, KGLO-TV, Mas 
City, Iowa, offered a World Affa 
News Map to viewers for 25^. 
tion ordered some 2,500 copies of t 
map but was swamped, in three wee 
with 6,000 requests. 

• A meeting of the media: 1 
ecutives of the home office of 
Foster & Kleiser outdoor adver 
ing company in San Francisco i 
agencv figures dealing with the 
recently attended a luncheon given 
Metropolitan Broadcastins Corp. 
its New York station. WNEW-T 



16 APRIL ]0 



i gesture of thanks to the many 

i >le attending the session, F&K 

e up a special painted billboard 

placed it at an outdoor location 

le heart of the advertising agency 

•ict. It read: "Thank you for at- 

ing the WNEW-TV party" and 

d all the names of those present. 

■ m Ballet has its day on tv: 

rV, Omaha, recently televised a 

With Dancing half-hour spon- 

d by the Ballet Theater of Omaha. 

■idea: Elfi Hosman, operator and 
uctor at the Theater wanted to 
Omahans about ballet and felt 
best way to do it was to have her 
Is appear on a tv show. Result: 
school has since received appli- 
m >>ns for enrollment. According 
tation. Mrs. Hosman is "so pleased 
the results that she's consider- 
i-'l. a ballet series on KETV this 
," 

Joining forces: In an unusual 
oach to an unusual problem, ra- 
and tv in the Lexington market 
BIG, WKYT-TV, WLAP, 
EX-TV, and WVLK) got to- 
ier to tell the story of the Cen- 
Kentucky area to the industry, 
reason: Since Lexington and 
iral Kentuckv are comparatively 
3 in terms of miles to Cincinnati 
Louisville, the area stations felt 
were not being considered as a 
rate market. So the stations, over 
riod of nine months and with the 
^eration of the Chamber of Com- 
^e created a national campaign 
all attention to the isolated situa- 
existing in Lexington. 

k 



sa V data: KOB-TV, Albu- 
vque, recently hosted official open- 
ceremonies for its new $100,000 
ios . . . Business notes: The 
(tern Regional Ford Dealers pur- 
ed, for the 26-week baseball sea- 
the Meet Your Giants tv package 
luced by Franklin Mieuli & As- 
ates . . . General Lifeco & Safeco 
ranee Companies of America 
le & Weber I will sponsor the 
^ral Sports Newsreel which will 
ediatelv follow L.A. Dodger 
es on KTTV, Los Angeles . . . 
Ios: John W. Kluge, president 
chairman of Metropolitan Broad- 
ng Corporation, received the Ad 
j> of Washington. D. C.'s Award 
enlevement for "outstanding con- 
itions in the field of broadcast- 



vSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 




NEW TV DATA 

i Continued from page 43 l 
broken don o l>\ region. 

• National t\ ratings plotted on 
large chart (see portion reproduced 
on page 13). Covers all prime time 
net shows, broken down among eight 
criteria, including age and sex. per- 
centage tuned to all and less than all 
of the show, percent of all house- 
hold-, uith or without tv. watching. 
in addition to the more conventional 
audience share categories. 

From here Sindlinger moves into 
study of the characteristics of each 
program's audience. Its series, known 
as "Household Characteristics by 
Tv Program." encompasses ratings 
broken down as to household income, 
age and occupation of household 
head, location of household bv mar- 
ket size, size of household, number 
of tv sets owned, and ownership of 
color tv. The research firm com- 
putes characteristics on an individual 
as well as household basis, examining 
in-home, out-of-home and color tv 
viewers in terms of age and occupa- 
tion by sex. and age by household 
income. These characteristics rating 
reports are published quarterly, based 
on the first eight weeks of interview- 
ing for each quarter. Each progran/s 
characteristic rating will be based on 
a sample of over 9.600 tv homes. 

Here's an example of the difference 
a charactertistic rating can make. 

One Sindlinger client with a multi- 
million dollar investment in a tv pro- 
gram had reason to be concerned 
over his 15.3 average minute house- 
hold rating. On closer examination, 
however, it was found that among 
his best potential customers — the 
>5.000 to sT.500 income group and 
the clerical, sales, craftsman and 
foreman group — his charactertistic 
rating is 19.5. Furthermore, within 
the household head age group of 35 
through 44. which huys half of the 
's product, the rating turned 
out to be 21.4 among females and 
19.9 among males. 

On a custom basis. Sindlinger 
evaluates what would happen to a 
specific program were it to change 
timeslot and face other competition. 
Other custom services: product use 
by program viewers; plans to buy 
by program viewers; sponsor identi- 
fication by program viewers, and ex- 
posure to specific combinations of 
media by program \ieuers. ^ 




Tv and radio I 
NEWSMAKER 



Jp 



of WESC. Greenville. S. 



Robert A. Schmid has been appointed 
ecutive v. p. of the Headley-Reed Co. 
be in charge of station development. h< 
quartered in New \ork. Schmid joined 
rep firm as v. p. in January. 1959. Pi 
to that time he was. for eight years, 
and member of the board of director 
RKO-General. Previously, he held a s 
lar position at Mutual. Schmid is ov 
C. Also appointed: I. N. Hardinghani 
senior v. p. and general manager. He joined Headley-Reed in l 1 

Donald C. Kamin has been appointed 
Midwest sales manager for Storer Broad- 
casting Co. An experienced broadcast sales- 
man, he joins Storer after five years of 
service with the katz Agency in Chicago 
where his duties called for the national 
representation of several Storer stations. 
Prior to that, he was a radio salesman for 
the George P. Hollingberv Co. in Chicago. 
Kamin was graduated from Northwestern Lniversitv where he I 
jored in business administration. He served two vears in the An 



Richard H. Close, director of NBC 
Sales, has been elected v.p. He's 

active in the spot sales division for 
than 20 years, having joined NBC in 
as a page. His posts since then inc: 
supervisor of national spot sales b 
sales service manager for NBl 
represented stations, and account exei 
in national spot sales. Close also 
manager, national spot sales: Eastern sales manager for radio, tl 
t\ : and national manager for represented stations. NBC Spot 





v 



Worthington Miner, who developed and 

produced such programs as Studio One. 

Toast of the Town. Medic, and Frontier. 

has been named executive producer of The 

Pla\ of The Week Production Co.. a new 

division of National Telefilm Associates. 

I David Susskind will continue his relation- 

ship with the series on an individual play 

production basis, i Miner's career in the 

theater started in 1925. He became manager of program develoin 

at CBS TV in 1939 and later moved to NBC TV as exec pro ; u 



£& 



16 APRIL r 



WE 
BUTTER 

THE BREAD 
ON BOTH 

SIDES AT, 
KERO-TV 






There's More Than 
One Side to KERO-TV, 
Bakersfield. 

It's the one and only 
advertising medium 
that spreads over 
the whole of the 
Southern San Joaquin 
Valley, all five 
rich-living couniies 
of it. 



KERO-TV 

BAKERSFIELD 

CALIFORNIA'S SUPER-market 

A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 
CHANNEL 10 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Do you really know your customers'? Do you really like them." According 
to Ted Smith, manager of the Detroit office of Adam Young Inc. and Young 
Television, these are two of the most deeply significant questions any seller 
or marketer of national advertised products should ask himself. Here is a 
highly provocative argument for radio that doesnt depend on ratings, charts 
or coverage areas. Hon about your own "Seller's f iewpoint"? Get that 
gripe or question off your chest and send it in today. Just make it a straight- 
from-the-shoulder talk to sponsor readers — in not more than 500 words. 

WHO BUYS YOUR CAR. MISTER? 




#% few weeks ago. when a new decade was only eight 
days old, a dynamo called Whit Hobbs came into this city, 
and delivered a speech at the Adcraft Club. If you didn't 
hear this man. you missed something that could be pretty 
important to you in this next ten years. In fact, if you 
don't adopt some of Mr. Hobb's philosophies — whether you 
get them from him, or someone else — the consequences 
could be grave. 

Mr. Hobbs had nothing to say — but common sense. He 
is a creative copy director of BBDO, and, quite naturally, 
spoke as a copy man. In doing so, he proved conclusively 
that cop\ . sales, marketing and research are forever welded 
— that the good is based on logic, truth, fact, and origin- 
ality: and the bad, on whim, deception, half truth and 
sameness. On the latter point, he dwelt quite a while. He 
spoke of the halcyon days, "Before I went grey — all over." 
He spoke of the dead, laden feeling one gets from an 
over-saturation of unoriginality in advertising toda\ . 

Most of all. he implored us to learn to like our custom- 
ers. He urged us not to over estimate our customers and 
not to under estimate them — but to learn to like them. 

And so I sa\ : who buys your car. mister? 

Is it a special type of person, as some people would 
have me believe? Is it someone who has never erred in 
- ol the law. beyond a parking ticket donated by 
an over-zealous cop while the recipient was in church? 

Or is it simply a person old enough to drive, who hap- 
pens to have the required downpa\ ment? 

\nt long before coming here last September. I had oc- 
casion to chat with an agency man in New York. The 
agency handles Rolls Royce, and we were discussing the 
alread) classic advertisement that is headed — "$13,500." 
"There was a reason for that ad." he explained, 
even though we have production limitations that Detroit 
doe- doI have, we want to keep orders out in front. True 



1 



we placed the ad in such mags as New 1 orker. becau 
felt that these readers would more likely have the kii 
money we are talking about. We didn't reallv care. I 
ever, whether the customer bought the magazine, or wl d 
er he picked up a copy in a streetcar or a dentists 
The important consideration was that he should have J 
cess to S 13.500." 

The person who buys your car does not often read I 
New York Times. He does not read Saturday Revieu 
often. He does not see manv Broadwav products 
though he does buy the records of the musicals. He 
these, because he does listen to the radio, and he 1 j . 
these records pretty often. If you want to talk to tl 
man. vou can talk to him every dav. on the radio. 

Is he listening to a special kind of radio? 

\es. he is. He is listening to the verv special kind ol 
dio that reaches out and offers a handshake and sa>-. 
want to be your friend." For in the simple philosophy 
offering the hand of friendship can be found the kn 
the dramatic rise in popularity of the modern radio ; 
tion. The old line stations which have continue! 
dominate a market have done so because they adopte-i 
policy of talking to. not at their listeners. And in prt 
cally every one of these cases, you'll find that their c.y, 
nation lies mainly in peak traffic hours, when they ar- i 
facing life with Portia. \\ hen. in fact, they are 
for short periods of time, the kind of music and sen 
that the leading independents and semi-independents p 
vide all day. all night long. 

Modern radio isn't new — its damned nearlv ten 
old, as a nationwide recognized established entitv. 
the next decade, starting right now. it will be wise foi 
to get to know this fellow. 

I urge \ou: get to know him now. After all. he 
your car — mister. 




Help forge the only link with freedom 

that 76 million satellite captives have — 

support Radio Free Europe 



Leaders of the broadcasting industry — men 
like Golde-nson. McGannon, Sarnoff and 
Stanton— are today urging you to help tell the 
truth to the audience that needs it most. Use 
your programs, your voice to back up your 
Radio Free Europe colleagues. Seldom has 
American broadcasting had such an opportu- 
nity to help sustain/ree broadcasting through- 
out the world. Your RFE kit contains all the 
radio and television materials you need to do 
a complete job. 

What Radio Free Europe is 

RFE is a privately supported network of 28 
transmitter and relav stations broadcasting to 



76 million captive peoples in Poland. Hungary, 
Czechoslovakia. Bulgaria and Romania. It is 
on the air up to 18 hours a day reaching this 
vital, truth-hungry audience. 

Why RFE is important 

Without broadcasts like those of RFE, the cap- 
tive peoples of satellite countries would never 
know the truth about the outside world. It 
gives moral sustenance to those nations which 
have traditionally loved freedom. During the 
Special Campaign period, April 24 — May 8, 
please give Radio Free Europe your all-out 
personal support. 



Broadcasters for Radio Free Europe 



NSOR • 16 APRIL 1960 



SPONSOR 



The convention in retrospect 

A big convention, chock full of meetings, speeches, social- 
izing presentations, plans, and parties, is always difficult to 
see in proper perspective. 

By now. though, most of us who attended the NAB's 38th 
annual convention at the Conrad Hilton, have had a chance 
to return home, unpack our luggage, review our notes, and 
think through what we saw and heard in Chicago. 

What single impression remains most vividly? 

Many NAB members and associates with whom we talked 
seem to feel that this was a very "quiet convention." 

It is true that there were comparatively few, if any, fire- 
works. There were many interesting and professionally 
planned meetings. These were some exciting new technical 
exhibits by RCA, AMPEX, Collins, Gates, GE, and others. 
There were challenges, such as those advanced by RAB's 
Kevin Sweeney, at the radio session. There were thoughtful 
reports on the Tv Code by Don McGannon, and the TIO by 
Lou Hausman. There was a moving tribute to Hal Fellows 
by Frank Stanton. 

But to us the one most significant speech at Chicago was 
delivered quietly, and forcefully, by the NAB's Broadcaster 
of the Year, Clair R. McCollough. 

Clair, in his keynote address, called for "intensive self- 
inspection" by every NAB member, in three areas of activity 
— "Our trade practices, our performance before the public, 
and our national association." 

He was most specific and most pointed in enumerating "the 
fundamental ills of broadcasting . . . rate manipulations, 
trade deals, downgrading the competition in our own media." 

Said McCollough, "Until we cure them . . . and we can 
only cure them individually, we run the continuing risk of 
loss of advertiser confidence . . . and public confidence." 

To those outside the industry, it may seem surprising that 
Clair ranks this problem as even more serious than broad- 
casting's more publicized ills. 

But those who know the record of this industry statesman 
know that he speaks from deep, mature experience when he 
calls on the industry to take an inventory of its business prac- 
tices, and to undertake the job with "courage, determination, 
a high sense of business values, and a goodly amount of 
moral rearmament." We agree with his analysis. ^ 



10-SECOND SPOTS 

Slogans unlimited: KOMO- 

Seattle, is promoting via auto bum 
stickers. Sample stickers: "Made 
Disneyland by Mickey Mouse"; "B 
in Chicago by the Untouchable 
"Made in Detroit by the Til 
Stooges"; "Built in Mule SI 
Texas, by The Rebel"; "Protected 
Robert Taylor's Detectives"; "M 
in Mukilteo by The Real McCoys. 

Like a boid: From a WINS, 

York, press release — 

"Can your dog sing? If he can, I 

WINS is looking for this 

genius." 

He not only sings; he takes pay: 

Elephant boy: With only S50 i 
poke, an adman went to the psycj 
trist. 

"For $50," said the psychia 
"I'll answer two questions. Ph 
your problem so two questions 
solve it." 

After considerable thought, the 
man asked, "Is it all right for n 
marry an elephant?" 

"Of course not," said the psyi 
trist. "Society would not allo\ 
It wouldn't work out. I see not 
but trouble ahead in such a unio 
forget it. Now, what's your se 
question?" 

Asked the adman. "Do vou 
anyone who'd like to buy an ov< 
engagement ring?" — Carl de 
WBZ, Boston. 

Sugar-coating: Oscar Levant 
his doctor won't let him watcl 
Chevy Dinah Shore Show o 
count of his diabetes. 

Backfire: In his daily "> 
Street" contest for listeners i 
Pittsburgh, Pa., area, WCAE pi 
ality Tommy Shafer made his 
announcement: "Anyone living 
Money Street I'm about to nan 
gardless of borough or hamlet, m 
call. First one in is the winner]!! 
Money Street is Railroad Ave 
Winner was Mrs. Aretha Jonesj 
Railroad Ave.. Tallahasse, Fla.|r 
was visiting in Pittsburgh. 

Like real: Hear about the | 

conventioneer who tumbled i 
hotel bed about 4 a.m., dreanJ 
swallowed a snowball, and ij 
morning his pillow was gone? j 

sponsor • 16 april! 




PROOF: 

WSJS Television's City Grade coverage saturates 
fourteen cities, each with over 6000 population, in 
North Carolina's biggest Metropolitan market. These 
fourteen cities are located in the rich industrial Pied- 
mont — North Carolina's first market buy with WSJS 
Television. 

"■ft JTsfaft television 
Winston-Salem / Greensboro 




CHANNE 
Headley-Reed, Reps. 



WHEELING: 




TV MARKE 



One Station Reaching The Booming Upper Ohio Valle; 




No. 18 

WTRF-TV Image Series 

TOYS 

The Louis Marx Company of Glendale, 
West Virginia {8 miles south of W heeling) 
is a 15 million dollar Wheeling area in- 
dustry producing steel and plastic toys, 
anything from a complete Ben-Hur Set 
to a Cape Canaveral Missile Base. In 
this 36-county market where nearly 2 
million people earn over a z}' 2 billion 
dollar spendable income, Marx Toys em- 
ploys 1000 people and dispenses a 4J4 
million dollar annual payroll. People who 
earn are people 'xho spend . . . Marx em- 
ployees typify the folks who comprise the 
big and buying WTRF-TV audience. Are 
these folks getting your message ... are 
you ringing up sales in the 7500 retail 
outlets here? 



^ORLD^S LARGESTJOYxMAKEI! 



316,000 watts fj g Q 



WEST VIRGINIA 



wtrf-t 



reaching a market that's reaching new importance! 



NS 



■ ^ 



IE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 












r 







CIALIST 

IN 
SPOTS 



KOB-TV Albuquerque 

WSB-TV Atlanta 

KERO-TV Bakersfield 

WBAL-TV Baltimore 

WfiR-TV Buffalo 

WfiN-TV Chicago 

WFAA-TV Dallas 

WNEM-TV Flint-Bay City 

KPRC-TV Houston 

KARK-TV Little Rock 

KCOP Los Angeles 

WPST-TV Miami 

WISN-TV Milwaukee 

KSTP-TV ...Minneapolis-St. Paul 
WSM-TV Nashville 



WNEW-TV New York 

WTAR-TV Norfolk 

KWTV Oklahoma City 

KMTV Omaha 

KPTV Portland, Ore. 

WJAR-TV Providence 

WTVD Raleigh-Durham 

WROC-TV Rochester 

KCRA-TV Sacramento 

WOAI-TV San Antonio 

KFMB-TV San Diego 

WNEP-TV.Scranton-Wilkes Barre 

KTBS-TV Shreve 

KREM-TV 

KARD-TV 



Get the best coverage for your advertising dollars. Follow the lead of 

hundreds of alert national advertisers . . . who are spotting their TV 

vertising where it works most effectively— on these great stations. 



[Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

Af/ie Original Station A 
Representative 



ARE SPOT 
CARRIERS FAIR 
TO SPOT TV? 

Next season will see 
new high in network 
video participations 
The reps are worried 

Page 35 



Bristol-Myers 
has 'old-style' 
tv headaches 

Page 38 

D.j. hath charms 

to soothe 

the savage beast 

Page 40 

A SPONSOR 

plan 

fede 



THE 


QUALITY 


TOUCH 


^ 


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SP 


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i^fe 


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^^kk ' -*" ' * ^V«i 


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\'^;k V' 


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radio & television • dallas 

Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH market 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



There are no short cuts to 

quality, as evidenced by the beautiful 

prints produced by the 

age old process of stone lithography. 

Neither are there short cuts 

in the building of a quality image 

so precious in the operation 

of today's better radio and television 

stations. 



Represented by 

CO© 




ssor • 23 APRIL 1960 



WSIXTV 

Tops Them All In 
The Nashville Area 

LEADING IN . . . 

6 out Of TOP 
10 

out of TOP - 

SHOWS 



r WSlXsELLS WITH TOWER HEIGHT 

2049 ft. above sea level . . . none taller 
permitted in this area by CAA. 

r WSlXsELLS WITH POWER 

316,000 powerful waits . . . 
maximum - permitted by FCC. 

WSlX SELLS WITH EFFICIENCY 

Maximum coverage and low cost per 
thousand make WSIX-TV your most 
efficient buy in the rich Middle Tennessee, 
Southern Kentucky, Northern Alabama 
TVA area. 



(X) 



CHECK THESE 

FACTS: 



|X) TV Homes — 370,700 
(X) Population — 1,965,500 
(X) Effective Buying Income — 

$2,155,868,000 
(X) Retail Sales — 

$1,585,308,000 




i oi. 14. No. i: 



^i spo 



• 23 APRIL 1960 | 

NSOF 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV RADIO ADVERTISERS US 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Are network spot carriers fair to spot tv? 

35 Evidence of a trend slowly developing for several year? turns up 
force. Here SPONSOR explores opinions about its effect on the incu- 

Bristol-Myers' old-fashioned headache 

38 Ad Director Whittaker has old-style sales and cost headaches, ra 
than new Washington-originated jitters suffered by some drug ain 

'I know she won't bite, but . . .' 

40 D.j. meets lioness as part of station promotion in photograph 
studio, and initial fear is replaced by affection between man and b< 

More than one president for NAB? 

42 With the industry search for a successor to Hal Fellows, sro>s< 
11-year-old proposal for a federated XAB gains new broadcaster supj 

Renault snow romp ups sales 20% 

45 Dealer enthusiasm on Dauphine"s sure-footedness sparks giant ' 

promotion spearheaded by sponsorship of CBS TVs Winter 0/yroj 

Chost audience stuffs ballot boxes 

47 Getting socked with a zero rating is no joke to a small radio st, 
like WZIP. Cincinnati. Here's how it fought back and reversed t 

Higbee's night radio jackpot 

48 This Cleveland department store buys two three-hour night music I 
taculars per week and hikes its record sales to home radio audi( 

$70 in merchandising reaches 100,000 homes 

49 To promote This Man Daicson. WAST (TV), Albany, enlisted h-1 
Armour & Co.. gained maximum exposure with minimum cash of 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

60 Film-Scope 

30 49th & Madison 

64 News & Idea W rap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

64 Picture Wrap-l'p 

56 Radio Basics 

27 Reps at Work 



80 Seller's Viewpoint 

52 Sponsor A»k< 

62 Sponsor Hears 

1 9 Sponsor-Scope 

82 Sponsor Speaks 

SO Spot Buys 

82 Ten-Second Spots 

78 Tv and Radio News 

59 Washington Week 



023 



. Teltphon.: MM 



Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. 

Office: Town House, Birmingham Phone: rairra 

Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ara., Baltim* 

Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countri.i 

year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single cc 

all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. h 

by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid i 

©1960 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 



ANEW 
RIGHT ARM 




Tv« TELEVISION ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 

Offices in principal cities . . . representing : 

WBZ-TV Boston • WJZ-TV Baltimore • KDKA-TV Pittsburgh 

KYW-TV Cleveland • KPIX San Francisco 



Everywhere 
we go . . . 




they know 

WALB-TV 

is the 

exclusive 

NBC station 

in South Georgia 
and N.W. Florida! 



• Serving over 750,000 peo- 
ple with over $739 million 
spendable income. 

• New 1,000 foot tower, 316,- 
000 watts power. 

• Grade "B" coverage area in- 
cludes Albany, Thomasville, 
Valdosta, Moultrie, Ga., and 
Tallahassee, Fla. 



WALB-TV 



ALBANY, GA. 
CHANNEL 10 



m 



e South by James S. Ayers Co. 







NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



ABC Radio is setting its sights on the 'young marrie* 
market. Under the leadership of Robert R. Pauley, next 
appointed vice president in charge, ABC plans expand 
program service uith this youthful group, '"''forsaken by I 
other networks" as Mr. Pauley puts it. primarily in mil 



The newsmaker: Robert R. Pauley has been named i 
president in charge of the ABC Radio Network, succeeding its fori 
head. Edward DeGray. Mr. Pauley has served as eastern sales 
ger since March, 1959: He joined ABC Radio in October. 1957 
account executive. Earlier assignments: account executive, 
Radio: associate account executive, Benton & Bowles: account 
ecutive. NBC Radio, and account executive, WOR. New York. 

Mr. Pauley foresees extensive improvement and expansion in . 
Radio program service within the 
new emphasis on the y outhful 
audience. "We have no intention 
of bypassing other segments of the 
populace," he explains, "but in so 
far as it's compatible with affili- 
ates, advertisers and the other lis- 
teners, we do plan an orientation 
in the direction of youthful tastes." 

More will be known as to spe- 
cific steps to be taken in pursuit of 
the young marrieds after the Affili- 
ates Advisory Board meeting 

scheduled for early May. Mr. Robert R. Pauley- 

Pauley anticipates a welcome reception for the new approach « 
affiliates, because, as he sees it, the programing most of them 
velop on their own falls into a similar category. 

In outlining company policy Pauley states. "ABC Radio 
to give the advertiser true value for his dollar, supported by s( 
effective merchandising but without gimmicks. Advertisers are ti 
of the gimmick and it does nothing for the listener. Radio's true \ 
can stand on its own." 

ABC Radio is currently averaging about 36 hours of progra 
per week, 22 of which are commercial. Under the new regime. 
number is going up. In announcing Mr. Pauleys elevation, A> 
can Broadcasting-Paramount Theatres president Leonard Golder 
stated. "ABC is in network radio to stay, and we plan to expand 
programing service to the millions of Americans to whom net\ 
broadcasts are a daily necessity." 

The new ABC Radio head received his M.B.A. from Har 
1951. He is a member of RTES, the Harvard Club of New York 
New Canaan, Conn.: the Empire State Society. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 




IEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

WNOR "ZZ appoints EASTMAN 



WNOR 



md*. 



E TIDEWATER AREA'S ORIGINAL FULL TIME INDEPENDENT STATION HAS. 



rMore local advertisers than any 
other Norfolk station. (52% more 
local business than next station). 



'// Record of superior sales perform- 



ance (list of local advertisers 
average 5 1 /2 years on WNOR). 



/ Exclusive radio advertising franchise 
with many local clients. (% of all local 
advertisers use WNOR exclusively). 



[ Community-oriented personality 
salesmen (Warren Hull, 
Jerry Joiner, Bob Kalomeer, 
Paul Hennings, Bruce Miller, 
Bryce Bond, Dan Steele). 



Award winning news department 
(Associated Press Award for coverage 
of segregation issue). 



f Exclusive coverage major 
" league night baseball. 



Jack Harris, Vice President and 
General Manager. 
Warren Hull, Vice President 
Public Relations 




robert e. eastman & co., inc. 



representing major radio stations 

f;W YORK: CHICAGO: SAN FRANCISCO: DALLAS: ST. LOUIS: LOS ANGELES: DETROIT: 

I Madison Avenue 333 N. Michigan Ave. Russ Bldg. 211 North Ervay Bldg. Syndicate Trust Bldg. Taft Building Book Building 

fi'York22,N.Y. Chicago, Illinois San Francisco, Cal. Dallas, Texas 915 Olive St. 1680 N. Vine St. Detroit, Mich. 

F za 9-7760 Financial 6-7640 YUkon 2-9760 Riverside 7-2417 St. Louis, Missouri Hollywood, Cal. WOodward 5-5457 

CEntral 1-6055 HOIIywood>7276 



M»NSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 




"As long as there is a voice, there is 
hope . . ." Since World War II, the 
Voice of America has been the voice 
of freedom and truth and hope for 
peoples of the world. 
And for these past 18 years, the 
Crosley Broadcasting Corporation 
is proud to have played a part in 
this Voice of America. Since 1942 
Crosley has operated 6 transmitters 
near Bethany, Ohio, as a link in 
the Voice of America, International 
Broadcasting Service of the United 
States Information Agency — helping 
to beam broadcasts in 37 languages 
to countries of the globe. 



ISRICA 



This is one of the many public 
services of the Crosley Broadcasting 
Corporation, whose principle has 
always been that its WLW Radio 
and TV Stations must give endless 
service to their communities. 
And thru cooperation with the 
Voice of America, it is service to 
the community of the world. 
This is our pride and our privilege. 




Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, 
a division of Avco 



/ 



N 



\ 



J Attention \ 

/ advertisers! \ 

/Piel's Beer is sponsoring '. 
INTERPOL CALLING, \ 
starring Charles Korvin as \ 
Inspector Paul Duval 
on Now York's WPIX. 
Sunday nights at 10:30. 
Now Interpol's story, 
which the public has been 

reading about in 
Reader's Digest and other 

magazines and } 

V newspapers, comes to / 

* television ... ' 

\ presented bv / 

\ Piel's. / 




Sounds V 

great. Bert. Just \ 
like you and me. * 
/ INTERPOL CALLING \ 
| and Piel's make a 

sure-fire selling 

I combination. And if I may ' 

make one small pun. J 

\ both Duval and Piel's i 

\ always keep their * 

\ heads ... in any / 
situation. 
\ 



/ 



/ 



INTERPOL CALLING' 

the new television series that 
Bert, Harry. Blitz-Wei n hard. 
Pfeiffer's. Labatts. Miller High Life. 
Santa Fe Winery and so many 
other kinds of advertisers are 
buying, buying, buying! 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



4M Modisort A»e • N. Y 22 • PLora $-2)00 

ITC OF CANADA, LTD. 

106 University to. • Toronto 1. Onl. • EMpire 21166 



- 



SPONSOR 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 



News Editor 



Managing Editor 

- Fred _ Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

- ine Piskerron 
W. F. Mibct, 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 



Associate Editors 

Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Seff 
Lloyd Kaplan 
Water F. Scanlon 



Production Editor 

Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

He'ene Ete'son 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 



Eastern Office 

Bernard Piatt 
Willard Dougherty 



Midwest Ma 

Roy Meachum 



Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Sreenberg, Manager 
Bill Oerelein 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Mass r mino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura Olten, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco: Syd Guttman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Flora Tomadelli 



Far-Reachin 




Today's the day 



^rH^?S 




our schedule starts on 







Must be nearly 
time for lunch. 

More than a few adverj 
have been pleasantly sur.: 
by SIX's far-reaching 
One reason is the pro 
dominance we have main: 
for 6 straight years. See 
Weed TV man about it. 



WCSH-TV ^ 

6 NBC for jj£ 
PORTLAND 
MAINE 

MAINE BROADCASTING SY| 

WCSH-TV 6, Portlond WIBZ-TV 

WCSH Rodio, Portlopd 

WLBZ Rodio, Bongor WRDO Rod 




SPONSOR • 23 APRII 




in Cleveland, particularly 



A spot announcement 
on WHK is the only way 
she can get through 
to him now. For she's 
not the only one 
who's overboard. 
He is, too— overboard 
for Metropolitan's brand 
of news, service and 
showmanship which 
rescued WHK from the 
deep, and brought 
it Cleveland's second 
largest* radio audience. 
Is your product in 
competition-infested 
waters? S.O.S. Blair, 
or General Manager 
Jack Thayer. Just 
call EXpress 1-5000 . 



WHK 



Cleveland | 

A station 
of the 

Metropolitan Broadcasting 
Corporation 



LISTENING 



ANGED! 



Concentrate in 

JACKSON, 
MISS. 

Did you know? 

LEADING 

THE 

SOUTH 

in . . . 

General Business Gains 
Bank Activity Increase 
Retail Sales Performance 

WJTV 

CHANNEL 12 

KATZ 



WLBT 

CHANNEL 3 

HOLLINGBERY 




by John E. McMillin 




Commercial 
commentary 



Sons and lovers in Chicago 

The lights in the Grand Ballroom of the Con- 
rad Hilton went dim. and suddenly in the back 
of the hall there rose the hubbub of a hundred 
valkyries. 

Then, as heads craned to see if Bob Kintner 
had invaded the joint and was trying to pull out 
Ollie Treyz' hair, five squealing, scrawny, scant- 
ily clad cheer leaderettes came yipping down the 
aisles and swirled in front of the footlights. 

"A-B-C-T-V," they chanted, stomping their feet and kicking thein 
heels and wheeling in intricate rhythm patterns. "Let's have a lon« 
cheer and a tiger for dear old A-B-C-T-V." 

Thus opened, with appropriate showmanship, what was to me th^ 
most dazzingly colorful session of the entire NAB convention, th 
ABC affiliates meeting on Sunday afternoon. 

It was, by any standards, a terrific show. No sooner had tin 
cheer leaderettes concluded their old-college-try bit and scamperec 
off amid startled laughter and applause, than ABC swung into it 
success story pitch with a fresh and crackling gusto. 

Julie Barnathan had put together an entirely new presentation o 
the network's rise-to-power charts, and I thought it had a zip am 
pungency that outmatched previous ABC efforts. His cartoon am 
Cellomatic comments on the plight of Networks Y and Z (partic 
ularly Network Z!) had the affiliates roaring with delight. 

Even FCC Chairman Ford, a surprise speaker, was impressec 
Recalling that he had been a commission attorney when Paramour 
was negotiating for the ABC purchase, he said, "Both ABC and 
seem to have come a long way." 

O Absalom, ray son, my son 

To me, though, the fun, excitement, and razzle-dazzle of the AB 
presentation were somewhat obscured by what happened a little latt 
in the program. After the network had detailed its proud history an 
potent plans Leonard Goldenson called on Edgar Kaiser of Kai*« 
Industries. 

The younger Kaiser, in an emotion-charged speech, paid tributj 
to, then introduced, the finest dad a man ever had, Henry J. hims^ltJ 

The stocky sovereign of the Kaiser empire then lumbered to tr« 
podium and paid tribute, not only to Edgar, but to "all my sons'* 
the Kaiser Industries. 

When he had finished a stirring 20-minute address, Spyri 
Skouras, titan of 20th Century Fox, rose with tears in his eyes to pal 
tribute to the paternal-filial relationships of the Kaiser family. Thejf 
not to be outdone, he called on his own boy Peter Levathes, pr<;a 
dent of 20th Century Fox Television, to share the platform with hr 

Man, we were up to our hips in fathers and sons before the aftej* 
noon was over. We wallowed in parental piety. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1 ( 'M 



IN THE NEW YORK MARKET 

MORE INDEPENDENT RETAIL DRUGGISTS AND MORE INDEPENDENT RETAIL GROCERS 
LISTEN FREQUENTLY TO WPAT THAN TO ANY OTHER RADIO STATION ■ MORE 
DRUGGISTS AND GROCERS ESPECIALLY ENJOY WPAT THAN ANY OTHER RADIO 
STATION ■ MORE OF BOTH CONSIDER WPAT THEIR FAVORITE RADIO STATION ■ 




These are the findings of a massive qualitative study of radio listening among the independent 
druggists and grocers in the New York market. Commissioned by Radio Station WPAT and 
conducted by Bennett-Chaikin Incorporated, this singular survey proves that WPAT dominates 
(retail listening at point-of-sale in the more than 6,000 independent pharmacies and 28,000 
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that's only the beginning of this extraordinary story of retailer loyalty in the world's largest 
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SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 13 



EVEN 
SMALL SCALE 
BUDGETS 
CARRY A 
LOT OF WEIGHT 



i 



Commercial commentary (continued) 




ON 
SAN ANTONIOS 




ABC Television in San Antonio . . . 

the Greatest Unduplicated Live 

Coverage in South Texas! 

Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



During the course of all this Old Testament-type schmalz, I ke 
looking across at George Gribbin, president of Young and Rubica^ 
who was silting in the second row. 

Many an agency executive grows nervous, embarrassed, ups« 
if he thinks a potent client is publicly bathing himself in bathos. 

But Gribbin is a good man. Not a shadow of doubt or embarras 
ment flickered across his keen and handsome features. During tD 
Kaiser speech, he looked bright, alert, interested, respectful. He gav 
I thought, the finest performance of the entire day. 

"Our statures touch the skies" 

The reason for the Kaiser oratory and the parade of sonnies 
daddies was what Henry Kaiser called "electrifying news." 

ABC, 20th Century Fox, and the Kaiser companies are going, r 
said, to "wage the biggest, boldest battle of the coming broadcastin 
season. We're taking on a television giant. We're going all-out i 
the new tv adventure series Hong Kong to win a tremendous viev 
ing audience for the hitherto unchallenged time of 7:30 to 8:3( 
Wednesday evening." 

In loving and colorful detail, Kaiser described "the unremittin 
Honolulu conferences" that had lead up this "daring announcement.! 

He related how' Levathes had declared that for Hong Kong, "W 
must and we will use the best writing and producer skills obtainable.! 
He told how Skouras had sent word "This is the biggest undertakinl 
that 20th Century Fox has ever taken on! We must make good." 

He repeated Ollie Treyz' statement, "We're committing ourselvei 
to a much bigger job than when we undertook Maverick." And 1 
described Leonard Goldenson's enthusiasm, "This is terrific! . . Thi 
is certainly a challenge to our people. We'd better pull out ever 
stop." 

He explained how the Kaiser sales departments and the Kaisd 
advertising agencies would apply "the old needle" to do a far, fa 
better job than ever before of "combining salesmanship and th< 
power of television." 

And he ended with these stirring words, "Let's together resolve 
to make no little plans, but bold plans to be given daring execution 

"Let's give the best to those we serve, and the best in achievement 
will flow back to gladden our hearts and make life truly rewarding 

"Let's see in each new challenge the opportunity to use our inch 
vidual talents better than before, knowing in our inner selves, as th( 
poet wrote — 

'We never know how high we are 
Till we are called to rise; 
And then, if we are true to plan 
Our statures touch the skies.' " 

No question about it, Mr. Henry J. Kaiser, in the course of a long 
and distinguished career, has probably never been more eloquent. 

His speech rang with all the evangelical fervor of a Peter the Her- 
mit summoning the Middle Ages to a great crusade. 

His vibrant phrases were those that might be used to spark a movejj 
ment for world peace, for finding a cancer cure, or for rescuing thel 
Holy Sepulcher from the fell hands of the infidel. 

That is why I was a little startled to realize that all this passionatl 
oratory was directed to dethroning Wagon Train as the rating kinJ 
of the 7:30 slot on Wednesday nights. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL I960" 



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There's a story of sales-security for your produce 
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; 3 or Nielsen surveys.) 



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Lancaster, Pa. 
NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
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ago • Los Angeles ■ Sa~ Franc BO 
SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS I NO. 



What Continental Baking (Bates) has in mind as a new approach for its spot 
tv domain could turn out to be a significant milestone and opportunity for local 
live programing. 

The bread-cake chain, which uses 80-90 tv markets, last week asked the reps to find out 
from their stations what types of live community programing, in addition to sports, 
would be available on a continuing basis. 

It's Continental's plan, after compiling this roster, to determine whether the pattern was 
of sufficient scope and depth to make it worthwhile for it to embark on this type of 
sponsorship on a grand scale. 



At the rate they were asking and buying last week it should be a record May in 
national spot tv — at least for the top markets. 

The activity in New York included: Roi Tan (Gumbinner) ; LaPalina (Compton) ; 
Armstrong Tire (Lennen & Newell) ; Black Flag insecticide (Y&R) ; Popsicle (Gardner) ; 
Manhattan Shirt (Daniel & Charles) ; General Analine's Ansco Div. (B&B) Corn Prod- 
uct's Magnolia Cooking Oil (Lennen & Newell). 

Out of Chicago: General Mills' Betty Crocker potato products (Knox Reeves); 
Toni, various products including Silver Rain (Tatham-Laird, North, C. E. Frank), sharing 
the same 60 market buys, 18 weeks; Schlitz Old Milwaukee (Gordon Best). Abbott Lab's 
Sucaryl (Tathum-Laird) is testing in a couple markets. 



With the exception of Ford and Chevrolet, the situation is so badly scrambled in 
Detroit that the automotives may delay making their network tv decisions for an- 
other six-eight weeks. 

Take Buick, for instance. It's got a compact on the way and before it can set up 
plans for the big car it has to decide on the marketing dimensions of the newcomer. 

As has been obvious, the headlong rush to compacts in Detroit has set the industry on 
a new kind of competitive spin — a situation that may produce for network tv, as well as 
spot, spasmodic rather than long-range buying. 

To keep their dealers happy the manufacturers have no choice but to go on spreading 
their price lines. 

Buick (McCann-Erickson) meanwhile, will unleash its radio blitz of four-second 
announcements in the top 50 markets. 

In New York the division is concentrating on Thursday, Friday and Saturday with 
130 spots a week spread over six stations. 

Another big one for radio coming out of Detroit: the GMAC schedule in 135 mar- 
kets which starts 28 May and runs for 16 weeks via Campbell-Ewald. It will be 
saturation traffic bulletins in 20 markets and 10 weekend newscasts in the remaining mar- 
kets. The schedule's about the same as last year. 



The warm weather accounts out of General Foods have started to break for 
spot radio: the action this week was on Certo and Sure- Jell (Y&R). 

Two beverages— Instant Siesta and Minute Maid— got on the what-have-you-got avail- 
able list via Bates. 

LaPalina (Compton) is gearing up for a midwest radio test. 



ponsor • 23 APRIL 1960 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE <xmsm*ed 



Buyers for Chicago agencies last week aired a couple gripes to SPONSO* 
SCOPE which they hoped stations would take heed of and give them a little coo 
eration. 

GRIPE #1: In smaller markets, particularly, where a station carries shows fro 
more than one network, the buyer can't be sure where or when the delayed progran 
will run. These stations could help a lot by finding out who the network buyers are . 
the agencies involved and send them copies of the weekly log. 

GRIPE #2: During the seasons of volume buys, when agencies and reps are busiet 
they have to deal a little too much with the rep's secretaries by phone. But, as cap 
ble as these girls are in the area of sales service, the buyers would rather get throu 
the rep's accountmen to make sure they get all the service they're entitled to. (Yc 
know, just to have that secure feeling that nothing's gone amiss.) 

The CBS Radio o&o's will probably pull out of the RAB after Arthur ] 
Hayes has gone through the formalities of resigning from the bureau's board < 
directors. 

The seven stations have been telling Hayes that they feel they haven't been getting t! 
value they require for the $36,000 they've been collectively putting into the RAB! 
coffers annually. 

What these stations have in mind: Recruiting three other 50KWs — WCCO, WB 

and WTOP — allied with them via CBS Spot Sales for a jointly subsidized promotional setu| 

As had been anticipated, the transfer of Burnett's Ken Eddy to the New York oil 
fice from Chicago has created a rivalry between rep offices in the two cities. 

Availabilities from both rep ends are matched between Burnett New York and Burn^ 
Chicago but where the New York rep offices have an advantage is this: since tl 
bulk of spot tv buying is in New York, a New York salesman can offer more caj 
celled spots as they become available without having to advise the station. 

Hence Burnett New York is in a better position to improve schedules continuously. 

More and more reps are resorting to this device to keep their radio statiol 
from dealing direct with national agencies which may be entitled to the local rat 
splitting the station commission in half. 

These reps feel that it's better to take half a loaf in connection with business placed 
local rates than to lose conrol of their function as agency go-between. 

Under the proposed arrangement, after the station decided that the account is entitled 
a local rate, it asks the agency to follow through with the station's rep. 

There's been a big shift just within the past three seasons in the sources < 
nighttime program control, in the area of network tv. 

Here's how this control compares in terms of percentages: 





INDEPENDENT 


NETWORK 


NETWORK 




YEAR 


PACKAGERS 


WHOLLY OWNED 


PARTNERSHIP 


AGENCIES 


1957 


64% 


16% 


15% 


5% 


1960 


20% 


28% 


52% 


0% 



For those who buy their chainbreaks by the rating book it's going to be quij I 
more perplexing than usual for the early fall months : there's so much starting frcj 
scratch on NBC TV and CBS TV's nighttime program lineups. 

On NBC Friday night has been completely made over, while just a smidgeon sij 
vives Monday and Tuesday nights. The latter also applies to CBS Thursday and Fridd I 
and you might even include Wednesday. 

20 sponsor • 23 APRIL 19(1 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Ollie Treyz told the AB-PT board of directors last week that ABC TV was over 
75% sold out at night for the fall. 

The basis of Treyz' calculations : the network's commercial minute by commercial 
minute count as plotted for the fall totals 153 and of these 120 minutes have been sold 
firm. 

By the way, ABC's new programing is going for about £33,000 per commercial min- 
ute, time and talent, to those with a small discount position, while the holdover hour 
shows would cost the same contingent $3,000-83,500 more. 

P.S. : The program price on Disney has gone up to $49,000 net per half -hour. 
Hence it'll take about $2 million to cover time and talent on alternate weeks. 

This might be taken as a demonstration that Chicago-headquartered agencies 
with savvy New York and Hollywood media-program offices get the best deals. 

NL&B (via the New York adjunct) snagged the alternate week of Jack Benny for 
State Farm Insurance, which calls itself the world's largest car insurance company and 
heretofore has been allied with pieces of network sports programs. 

Inspiring this upgrading : if State Farm's to maintain its lead position a program with 
the reputation of Benny and his ratings was imperative. 

CBS TV keeps making more and more daytime minutes available to its affiliates. 

The latest gesture in that direction: effective 9 May, all sustaining programs will be 
shortened to allow for 70-second station-breaks, which makes it possible for the stations 
to sell both a minute commercial and an ID. 

But as for nighttime minutes for spot sale by affiliates, there won't be any this 
fall. The stations for a while had at least two of them between 7:30-7:50 p.m. 

In some quarters the "liberalization" on minutes is seen as admission by the network 
that it doesn't expect its daytime business this summer to be up to snuff. 

Incidentally, a competitive network is quite confident that ABC TV will turn down its 
affiliates' request for the extension of nighttime breaks to 40 seconds. 

Remember in the heydey of radio when CBS was able to pull 'em out from un- 
der NBC's nose because William Paley was quicker with the decision and check- 
book? 

Well, it's happening all over again in tv — this time the party with the fast Fll-take-it and 
payoff being ABC TV's Leonard Goldenson. 

While Lever was negotiating for Fred Ma?Murray's My Three Sons with NBC TV's 
Wednesday 8:30 as the time, ABC swept off the property and sold it to Chevrolet. 

The film series came as a saver in this respect: Chevrolet saw the pilot of the Pat 
Butram show and changed its mind about sponsoring Butram. 

National Biscuit (McCann-Erickson) is staying with what it's got for 1960-61. 

And that's the alternate week of Wagon Train, a third of Rawhide and the juvenile 
perennial, Sky King. 

Chalk up one that ABC TV, despite a strenuous pitch, wasn't able to wean 
away from NBC TV's daytime roster: Brillo. 

The account has renewed for another 13 weeks (about $250,000), taking it through 
August. 

What with Dodge (BBDO) now agreeing to let it share Lawrence Welk alter- 
nate weeks, Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Parkson) this fall will have the bulk of its bill- 
ings on ABC TV. 

The basic nighttime buy includes a couple segments on ABC's nighttime spot carriers. 
Pharmaceuticals will also buy some daytime. 

• 23 april 1960 21 



L 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Ralston (Gardner-GB&B) has wrapped up its 1960-61 tv network conn 
nunts, giving it eight commercial minutes a week on ABC TV. 

The weekly minute alignment, Expedition, 2^; Leave It to Beaver, 2; Guestw 
Ho!, 1^2; Stagecoach West and Cheyenne, one each. 

Ralston's total tv expenditure: §10.5-11 million a year. 

Food products, and not the cigarettes, are the biggest customer at the mom 
of nighttime tv network spot carriers. 

As broken down by SPONSOR-SCOPE, the classifications in terms of the largest nun 
of 20-minute segments (which permits two minute-commercials over two weeks) come ou 
follows : 



CATEGORY 


ABC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC TV 


TOTAL 


Food, beverages, candy 


21 


2 


3 


26 


Soaps-toiletries 


6 


1 


7 


14 


Cigarettes 


8 


3 


3 


14 


Drugs 


5 


1 


2 


8 


Hard goods, etc. 


3 





2 


5 


Gasoline 





2 





2 


Total 


43 


9 


17 


69 



(See Are Net Spot Carriers Fair to Tv?, page 35.) 

Credit CBS TV with asking the highest price yet per commercial minute o 
nighttime series, and, to top it all, the program is a rerun. 

It's the Father Knows Best series and the price per minute, time and talent, < 
tive in the fall: $42,000. Share allotted for the program: $17,000 per 10 minutes. 

And for an advertiser to be entitled to this price he'll have to have a pretty good! 
count going for him. 

For a contrast: at ABC TV and NBC TV the commercial minute going rate for t 
lished shows— not repeats but first run— is $34-36,000. 

P&G will have eight shows — adding up to five hours a week — going on 
work tv come the fall, an increase of half an hour over the year before. 

The roster and the extent of sponsorship: Rifleman, all; Real McCoys, all; Capffl 
of Detectives, all; Peter Loves Mary, all; The Rebel, Wyatt Earp, Mr. Jones anal 

Law, alternate weeks; Cheyenne, two minutes a week. ABC's got them all but Peter Li« 
Mary, which will be on NBC TV. 



The big tobacco six collectively spent over $135 million for time and talenin 
all air media in 1959. 

An interesting sidelight on where the money went: network radio got about ?J 
million, whereas spot radio garnered $13.1 million net. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's estimates of the sextette's '59 participation in tv and radio, basep 
net time billings from various sources plus its calculation of program costs: 



ADVERTISER 

R. J. Reynolds 
Lorillard 
Liggett & Myers 
American Tobacco 
Brown & Williamson 
Philip Morris 



NETWORK TV 

$25,500,000 
17,500,000 
16,000,000 
14,000,000 
12,000,000 
13,500,000 



SPOT TV 

$4,400,000 
3,300,000 
2,400,000 
3,600,000 
6,200,000 
3,100,000 



SPOT-NET RADIO 

$5,600,000 

2,700,000 

2,800,000 

2,700,000 

700,000 

800,000 



TOTAL 

$35,500,000 
23,500,000 
21,200,000 
20,300,000 
18,900,000 
17,700,000 



Total 



$98,500,000 $23,300,000 $15,300,000 $137,100,000 



22 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, pa{ 
Spot Buys, page 50; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 59; SPOW 
Hears, page 62; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 60. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL % 




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ONSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



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Jack Brickhouse and Vince 
Woyd, ace sportscasters, add 
colorful word pictures to the 
exclusive color telecasts of 
Chicago Cubs and White Sox 
home games over WGN-TV 





The world's 
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station! 



This season marks WGN-TV's 13th year of telecasting base- 
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nation covering two home teams. 

Beginning with the season's opening home baseball game, 
WGN-TV is telecasting every daytime home game of both 
the Chicago Cubs and White Sox (120 in all) in Color . . . 
becoming the World's Most Colorful Station! 

Cubs and Sox home games sponsored by Theo. 
Hamm's Brewing Co. and Oklahoma Oil Co. 



WGN-TV 

symbol of responsibility in broadcasting (• WGn 



CHIC A f 



"The cashier slipped ^ 
and caught her foot in a 
loose basket of money 

. . . now we are $12.60 short. 1 " 




". . . but it's a small price to pay for the enter- 
tainment," concludes the manager of a Fort 
Wayne company, in a tongue-in-cheek fan letter 
to Ann Colone. 

The Ann Colone Show (wane-tv, week- 
days, 1 to 1 :25 p.m.) includes burlesqued as well 
as conventional physical exercises, interviews 
with visiting firemen, occasional cooking sprees, 
and, on one memorable occasion, an un- 
scheduled bout with a chimpanzee that tripped 
her on a mike cord. 

"Ask stout lady giving instructions to please 
join in ..." "My tv picture's off but I still hear 
sound . . . hope you do hair-curling part again 
when set's fixed . . ." "My specialty is spaghetti 
... I get the real cheese at your brother's grocery. 



. . ." (From real, live letters; Ann's brother 
hasn't written, but we understand he also 
approves.) 

The Ann Colone Show is daily confirma- 
tion of the vitality of local, live daytime tv. It 
takes its viewers (85 % women) out of the kitchen, 
provides color, humor, and serious information, 
draws an audience double that of either of two 
competing network shows. It typifies the Cor- 
inthian approach to programming— that it is 
not enough to rely on network service, even 
when it is as good as CBS makes it. Corinthian 
stations create their own programs to meet spe- 
cific regional needs and tastes. This builds audi- 
ence loyalty, wins viewer respect, helps make 
friendly prospects for our advertisers. 



Responsibility in Broaden tg 

m 



26 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 



KOTV 

Tulsa (H-R) 

KHOU-TV 

Houston fcBS-rv Spot Sales) 

KXTV 

Sacramento (H-R) 

WANE-TV 

Fort Wayne (H-R) 

WISH-TV 

Indianapolis (H-R) 

WANE-AM 

Fort Wayne (H-R) 

WISH-AM 

Indianapolis (H-R) 



Reps at work 




; 0R • 23 APRIL 1960 



Roger Hudson, sales manager, McGavren-Tv, Inc., New York, re- 
ports that selling techniques for spot television are currently under- 
going a period of change. "There's such hot competition for the spot 
tv dollar, that it's incumbent on all stations to make sure they 
get their story (results of successful campaigns! told. And equally 
important — stations have to con- 
stantly develop sound, new ap- 
proaches in selling the medium, 
not only with the idea of attract- 
ing new customers, but of showing 
those who already use the medium 
how they may profitably increase 
their buys. One approach involves 
demonstrating to the advertiser 
(through the agency) how he may 
have to add additional markets in 
order to adequately cover his own 
distribution patterns. For instance, 
should an advertiser buy Cleveland and neglect Akron and Canton, 
he may be neglecting an area where he has distribution, for the 
Cleveland station may not adequately penetrate the other markets." 
A successful campaign, says Hudson, can only better relations be- 
tween reps and buyers. "This kind of successful collaboration works 
for the client, based as it is on constructive service to the advertiser.'" 

Lionel Colron, v. p.. Walker-Rawalt Company. Inc.. Chicago, would 
like to see a little less hurried buying. "Sure, there probably isn't 
as much of it as is sometimes supposed, but it still gets hectic enough 
around here as we scramble to come up with a solid, last-minute 
schedule of avails. In the final analysis, the timebuyer and the rep 
are the ones who carry out the 
client's aims. Why. then, are there 
so many instances of buyers re- 
questing availabilities that are 
needed immediately, and request- 
ing at the same time that, due to 
the pressure of time, the availabili- 
ties be given to a third party des- 
ignated to collect them? This sit- 
uation makes it impossible for the 
rep to see the buyer until after the 
buy has been completed, or until 
it's too late to take advantage of 
the added information that can be gained in a personal interview."' 
Colton believes that the buyer is sometimes short-changed by other 
agency departments. "Would it not be in the best interests of the 
client if other people in the agency considered the buver and gave 
him more time in his important job of meeting with station repre- 
sentatives in order to secure the best possible results for his clients?"' 



27 




m 








.an T 
over to 
first! 

ABC TAKES THE LEAD IN 
NETWORK SPORTS. 

ABC Television will be 
sporting 189 hours of sports 
this year: major league 
baseball, NCAA football, pro 
boxing and pro golf. 

This major development of 
the New Look of ABC breaks 
down like this: 13 afternoons 
of NCAA football (12 Saturdays 
and Thanksgiving); 25 Sat- 
urday afternoons featuring 
the baseball game of the week; 
52 nights of professional 
boxing (switching to Saturday 
in the Fall); 26 afternoons 
of All-Star Golf; a number, 
as yet undetermined, of other 
eyefuls in the sports spectrum. 
It pleases us, of course, to 
have the nation's press hail 
this program rounding-out as 
a major coup. Nonetheless, 
it represents not so much a 
coup as a "completing" of a 
continuing programming 
philosophy aimed at attracting 
the maximum of the younger 
audience. For it is the younger 
audience, with its growing 
families, that does the most 
viewing and the most buy: 

These 189 sports hours 
can only widen this uJ ;ecep- 
tive audience reached by 
ABC Television. (Z% 



WATCH ABCTV IN '60 

{more people will) 



Make 
Every 
Spot 
Count 



If you want every spot to count, 
put it in KCRA's balanced pro- 
gramming that reaches a recep- 
tive, upper-income audience. Six 
long -established local personal- 
ities . . . news gathered, edited, 
and broadcast by 12 full-time 
newsmen, supplemented by NBC 
news coverage . . . leading sports 
coverage from Little League to 
the Worlds Series . . . plus the 
services of a full-time merchan- 
dising department that produces 
tangible results. And your com- 
mercial on KCRA is in a good 
"climate", too. Spots are restrict- 
ed to three minutes per quarter 
hour ( and we count promos and 
public service spots, too!), so 
your client's sales message can 
really be effective. Availabilities? 
Right now! 



"Radio 
One" 




49th and 
Madison 



Ktprttenttd by 
~( Ed w.rdYpetry *Yco., Inc J~ 



Coup for radio 

I was much interested in "Radio: 
New King of the Newsbeat" in the 
12 March sponsor because it ap- 
peared at the very same time we 
were sending out direct mail on a 
WCAU radio "scoop." 

On February 25th, WCAU radio 
broadcasted a taped interview be- 
tween one of our reporters and Phila- 
delphia district attorney Victor H. 
Blanc concerning the city vote fraud 
story (one of the biggest local news 
stories to break here in some time) . 
It was aired on our 6:00 p.m. news. 

The next day (2/26), the Phila- 
delphia Evening Bulletin carried the 
complete transcript. Our news opera- 
tion is a 24-hour a day, 7-day a week 
operation. 

The city vote fraud interview (car- 
ried by a major newspaper the next 
day) is not an isolated instance, I 
assure you. Our news department, 
headed by George Lord, is continual- 
ly on the prowl to capitalize on the 
immediacy of radio when something 
happens of importance on the local 
scene, while CBS news, of course, 
provides us with its superb, national 
and international coverage. 

Fred Birnbaum 

WCAU 

Philadelphia 

Well said! 

I have just read your tribute to 
Hal Fellows in the convention issue 
(2 April) of your magazine. It is a 
moving and deserved tribute. No 
one has said it so well. 

Charles H. Tower 

mgr., broadcast personnel 
6- economics 

NAB 

Washington, D. C. 

Rising to mass taste 

Quite by chance, last Friday, I was 
a witness to a thrilling experience. 
I just could not get over it and I 
had to write and tell sponsor about 



I was working at radio stat 
WCCC in Hartford, Connect ic 
doing my regular monthly audit t 
happened to overhear the broado 
of a program entitled What's on Y\ 
Mind, in which the listeners teleph* 
in and express their opinions on j 
subject at all. They were receivinj 
call at least every 20 seconds. 
an overwhelming number coni 
mented the station on the excellej 
of its musical programs (the sta^ 
features Music and News all 
long). Even after the program 
completed calls kept coming 
quite a long time. 

The thing that impressed me i 
the public's desire for "good mus 
as I was always under the impres 
that the general public's mu^ 
tastes were on a low level. 

I want to compliment radio 
tion WCCC for its attempts to c 
up to the level of what the pi^ 
really wants in the way of mil's 
programs instead of going dow< 
meet that level. 

Sidney C. Roller 
certified public accoun 
Hartford, Conn. 



Well taken point 

I can't resist the temptation to 
gratulate you on the "Comnie 
Commentary" column in youi 
March issue. McMillin's point 
well taken! As he so aptly sun 
his position in his last paragi 
progress would be made if the 1 
ing and shrieking were to cease 
if, in their stead, there could be 
responsible critical standards 
Scotty Reston, a Red Smith. 
Brooks Atkinson." 

Congratulations to you for t *P 
fine issue. 

Lee B. Wailes 
exec, v.p., planning ix fm 
Storer Broadcasting Co 
Miami Beach 




The only advertising of Mary Jane candies in March was one 
half-hour weekly on the BIG MAC SHOW, over WHDH-TV, Boston, 
through Ingalls Associates. After just one month on the air, sales 
jumped 90% over the previous year, the biggest March in history, 
according to Richard Gates, Sales Manager of the Charles N. Miller 
Company, makers of Mary Jane candies. You'll love the results 
Big Mac will get for you. Get aboard the Big Mac sales train today. 



U.CI.CI. 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

DALLAS 

LOS ANGELES 



247 Park Avenue, MUrray Hill 7-7800 
75 E. Wicker Dr., DEarborn 2-2030 
1511 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 
400 S. Beverly Drive, CRestview 6-5886 



• 23 april 1960 




// -A 





4f«-'gJa»\MOST NATIONAJ 




of any Boston TV statm 

193 compared to 148 for the second-place statl 



-^^ 



^J*, 



I'M 




p^ Jt^ 



■' 




X 



ADVERTISERS 

• »jd /oo& ai f/?ese o£/?er /ac£s about WBZ-TV! ■ Most local air personalities — more 
'an any other Boston TV station. ■ Most newscasts of any Boston TV station. 

Public service programming — 234 hours and 12,667 spot announcements contributed 

• ■st year to 203 charitable projects. ■ Largest TV share of audience.* ■ Most awards 

all Boston TV stations. *arb 

'fiat's why in Boston, no TV spot campaign is complete without the WBC station — 

(presented by Television Advertising Representatives, Inc. lA/ TlU* ™ J/ IF 

;yfg\(c) WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. tfj^\ BOSTON 



Its a habit- 




watching IMj-TV ^ FBSSNO 

J *" W * (California) 

TV viewers in Fresno see top shows in 

every category on KMJ-TV. For example: * kmj-tv . . , 

Top syndicated show Highway Patrol *^ *' l 55Jj 

Top late-night show Jack Paar l^kV •»*•■*•! 

Top network show Wagon Train «l 

Top network news show . . . Huntley-Brinkley Report ^^^^ faKElm 

Top local news show Shell News P! *-'"^! 1 

THE KATZ AGENCY. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

, SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1 () 




^ SPONSOR 

23 APRIL 1960 



WEB TV PARTICIPATIONS RISE SHARPLY 




ARE SPOT CARRIERS FAIR TO SPOT TV? 



^ Fall will find about a score of prime time network 
shows sold via minutes as trend abruptly advances 

^ Question: will it adversely affect spot tv selling 
J (or might it actually lose the nets some advantages ? 



^%s fall network tv schedules con- 
tinue to drop into place this week, an 
increasing drift to spot-carrier shows 
t ,j becomes more and more apparent. 
, Q There are many — especially those in- 
I jvolved in selling spot tv — who view 
the trend with something akin to the 
misgivings the late Wolcott Gibbs ex- 
pressed in his parody of Time Maga- 
zine: "Where it all will end. knows 
| God." 

I Consensus is it won't end unless: 

(1) The pendulum swings back 

from hour-or-longer network night- 



time shows to halfhours again, or 

(2) Network becomes a paperwork 
jungle, with all the complications of 
spot, or 

(3) Sponsors cry out again for 
program/star identification. 

At the moment, none of these 
things seems likely to happen in the 
near future; indeed, even the severest 
critics of the trend admitted to SPON- 
SOR that they only see it growing 
stronger. 

Next fall, about a score of night- 
time shows (mostly hours, of course) 



are slated to be spot carriers. The 
majority of these show up on the ad- 
vance slates of ABC TV. Anticipated 
is a strong surge in the same direc- 
tion bv NBC TV which will show up 
in 1960-61 line-up, with CBS TV 
forced to follow 7 . 

"We're watching this thing devel- 
op, if not with alarm, at least with 
apprehension," a station representa- 
tive told SPONSOR. "It's not quite new- 
enough to excite alarm (the trend 
has been showing for about two 
years), but it's sure as hell in clear 
enough focus now to point up a need 
in spot tv for three things: (1) 
awareness, (2) apprehension, and 
(3) girdling up the loins." 

The fact that has tempered feelings 
among reps and stations has been 
the fact that spot business has been 
roaring along, that last year spot tv 
came close to edging out net tv as 



sponsor • 23 APRIL 1960 



35 



CURRENT NET SPOT CARRIERS — AND MORE TO COME 



PROGR i W 




SPONSORS 


PROGRAM 


SPONSORS 


ABC 


77 SUNSET STRIP 


Canada Dry 
Derby Foods 
-Amer. Chicle 
Reynolds 
Whitehall 
Ritchie 






-L&M 


ALASKANS 




CHEYENNE 


■ BEAT 
OOT 


Armour 

Seven-Up 

—Amer. Chicle 
Armour 

Johnson & Johnson 
P&G 

H. F. Ritchie 
Ralston 

-Van Heusen 
P&G 
Reynolds 

Lib by-Owens-Ford 
Brown & Williamson 

Helene Cur; is 

- Simoniz 
Helene Curtis 
Quaker 
Hugger 
Carnation 
Brown & Williamson 


CBS 




RAWHIDE . 


Gulf 


BOURBON STREE1 


PERRY MASON 


Parliament 
Nabisco 
Pream 
Colgate 

Wrigley 


BRONCO/SUCARF 


Sterling Drug 

Gulf 


NBC 




LAW OF THE 
PLAINSMAN 




RIFLEMAN 


OVERLAND TRAIL 

RIVERBOAT 


Midas Muffler 
Sterling Drug 
P&G 

— Lorillard 
P&G 
Warner Lambert 

-Noxzema 


HAWAIIAN EYE 




Ralston 
P&G 






Amer. Chicle 
Whitehall 

H. F. Ritchie 

—L&M 


UNTOUCHABLES 


LARAMIE 


P&G 

Dow Chemical 






Seven-Up 
Ritchie 
Colgate 
Armour 
Car nation 


WALT DISNEY 


BONANZA 


Liggett and Myers 

Sunshine Biscuits 
Colgate 

Simonize (one time) 

RCA 







Ward Baking 
Mars, Inc. 


P&G 



No. 1 national advertising medium, 
that there are some hopes among spot 
sellers thai it ma} do it in 1960. 

But there are those who are be- 
coming a little more than apprehen- 
sive about networks muscling in on 
their territory. Among these is the 



Station Representatives Association 
which has been asking that if nets 
won't "lay-off," that at least they 
compensate their stations in some 
other way. 

There have been moves by the nets 
to tr\ to assuage feelings of affiliates. 



CBS TV, for example, has been gi 
ing their affils minutes to sell in da 
time; NBC TV has been offering fd 
nighttime minutes to their statior 
ABC TV has been giving back 1 
second chain breaks. But none 
these has quite eased the soreness 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1"(1 



le much to solve the problem. 
;C's four minutes isn't always re- 
ded as a fair trade; CBS daytime 
ituities aren't regarded quite as 
hly as prime nighttime, and the 
second breaks on ABC TV are 
lally sold off as a pair of 20-second 
nmercials that lead to triple spot- 
g and often to a break-down of the 
:e highly-esteemed "product pro- 
tion." Probably never before have 
works gone to such lengths to pla- 
e affiliates, but in this case appre- 
tion on the part of the recipients 
considerably less than overwhelm- 
{. There are stations who say that, 
:h the networks competition as it 
they can't worry anymore about 
:h things as product conflict or 
stection. 

'It's sad but true," a broadcaster 
d, "but the economics of tv rules 
: roost. Networking as it devel- 
fid during the heyday of net radio 
d the earlier davs of tv I up to as 
pently as two years ago) has been 
own out the window. 
"Tn former years, the strength of 

II tv lay in two big pitch points: 
) program identification for the 
|t show sponsor, (2) the opportu- 
t| to merchandise this identification 
dit up to the supermarket check- 
jt aisle. 

"During this time," he went on, 
le strong selling point for spot tv 
is that it was the most efficient, eco- 
mical way to use the medium." 
To capsule the differences between 
jt and spot: spot was set up market - 
•-market: network was a chain 
ok-up. Network advertisers re- 
ived the prestige of the shows they 
Jntified with. Spot tv offered the 
nefits of programing (through ad- 
pencies) without the costs of pro- 
aming. Today, the difference is 
rdly visible. 

"They say imitation is the sincerest 
rm of flattery," this broadcaster 
ncluded, "but I'm not sure it's help- 
s' anyone." 

On the client/agency side of the 

ace there also is some speculation 

out the far-reaching effects of the 

;nd. But any large concern is off- 

t by the realization that there's 

ing much to do about it, and that 

ght as well be accepted since, if 

ork were not possible to buy on 

new ""spot carrier" basis, all of 



television would have a different im- 
age. In addition, some advertisers 
have gone into network tv on a spot 
basis without even realizing it. 

Among the advertisers' specula- 
tions over the increase of spot car- 
riers is whether network buys are not 
going to get complicated out of all 
proportion. "Network stands to lose 
one of its greatest advantages," an 
agencyman told SPONSOR. "That is 
the ease of buying. The old claim 
that a network buy could be handled 
with a single bill falls apart when 
buying in on spot carrier shows. It's 
possible to come in for only a few 
times in a handful of markets, move 
in and out with all the flexibility of a 
spot flight. But the paperwork be- 
comes pretty monumental. That 'sin- 
gle bill' becomes a whole bookful of 
bills and affidavits. Compound that 
with discounts and what-not, and you 
long for an electronic brain to figure 
out the net." 

Just the same some of the biggest, 
blue-chip accounts are going in for 
net spot carriers (See chart). The 
reason is simple: They r want full one- 



AMONG HOUR SHOWS, 
MANY ARE CARRIERS 



minute commercials in prime time, 
and this is the only way they can get 
them except on independent stations. 

"If they'd take the trouble to con- 
dense their sales messages into 20- 
second commercials," an adman told 
SPONSOR, "I think they'd come close 
to doubling efficiency. On a spot car- 
rier, their cost-per-1,000 runs around 
$4.00. In spot tv, with shorter com- 
mercials and the right adjacencies, 
they might arrive at a cost-per-1.000 
of about $2.00." 

On the network side, it is not hard 
to see why the trend has developed. 
Increasing costs plus the growing 
popularity of longer shows (an hour 
or more) make it necessary to sell in 
segments; it is the next step in the 
evolution that began with co-sponsor- 
ships. Another factor is the network 
knowledge that it must attract as wide 
a field of sponsors as possible. The 
economics of this is as simple as 
basic English: If an hour show is 
divided between only two sponsors 
and one drops out, it is only half 
sold; hut if six sponsors share a show 
(Please turn to page 54 I 




Typical threesome: A trio of 
good-rated shoivs that nets sell 
like spot. {Above) NBC TV's 
Laramie; (Upper right) Rawhide 
on CBS TV; (Right) ABC TV's 
Adventures in Paradise series 



[Ionsor 



23 april 1960 



BRISTOL-MYERS: DRUG CLIENT 



^ Many drug executives have modern-day problems 
with government's concern about product, copy claims 

^ But B-M's ad chief Alfred Whittaker has old-hat 
migraines about tv costs, show control, competition 



I he noise level of complaints about 
the drug industry went up several 
decibels in Washington last week as 
the Senate heard new testimony 
charging lack of ethics in ethical 
drugs. And drug men in the ethical 
and proprietary fields alike suffered 
worsening headaches which show 
little sign of lessening. 

But in New York last week a lead- 
ing drug advertising executive was 
carrying on business as usual with 
the old-fashioned varieties of head- 
aches. He's Alfred A. Whittaker, 
vice president of Bristol-Myers' Prod- 
ucts Division and advertising direc- 
tor of some $45 to $55 million in 
ad money every year. He, unlike his 
drug industry colleagues over the 
past few months, is less perturbed 
about Washington events and more 
concerned with the infinitely numer- 



ous problems of new product devel- 
opment, marketing, advertising and 
costs. 

Alfred Whittaker's problems are 
fairly old hat, in contrast with the 
new obstacles which seem to have 
bestrewn paths of many drug com- 
panies. They're concerned about 
Federal Trade Commission interven- 
tion in copy and product claims. Mr. 
Whittaker, on the other hand, is more 
involved in the matter of program 
control. (He thinks the advertiser 
should have a large say-so in selec- 
tion.) 

Where other drug companies are 
knocking themselves out trying to 
find solutions to problems of visual 
treatment in tv commercials and pos- 
sible deception — inadvertent or other- 
wise^ — he's disturbed about the costs 
of the medium itself. 



Alfred Whittaker thinks "the FTC 
has made its position very cleaE 
FTC's stepped-up activity in 
matters has brought no wholesall 
changes in approach, procedure <x 
philosophy at Bristol-Myers." In 1 
opinion, "virtually every advertise) 
makes a concerted effort to be hones! 
And where misunderstandings arise 
feel they were nine times out of lj 
unintentional and done in good faith. 
Although the drug business is i 
petitive, it's not the dog-eat-dog situd 
tion of some industries, which "fini 
their people riding close to the line.; 
he contends. 

These two dilemmas — who shoull 
control network programing and hoi 
can tv costs be lowered — absoij 
much of his thinking time. TheVi! 
both subjects of constant discussio( 
by his tightly knit ad team an| 
among executives at the ad agenci< 
serving the various product s- 
DCS&S, BBDO, Ogilvy, Benson 
Mather and Young & Rubicam. 

Many of the current marketirj 
problems are centered in the 
counts serviced by Y&R. These ai 
the drug items, all across-the-counti 
products circulating in a tighten irj 




B-M's SALES AND TV BUDGETS GROW TOGETHER 





Product sales* 


Total tv« 


Spot tv« 


Net tv« 


1959 


$131,544,253 


$20,361,357 


$7,744,650 


$12,616,707 


1958 


113,870,317 


18,918,692 


2,845,890 


16,072,802 


1957 


106,847,430 


14,620,964 


2,131,010 


12,489,954 



1956 89,403,544 9,996,495 864,040 9,132,455 

* Product sales are for parent firm, North American subsidiaries; tv expenditures, for 
AD DIRECTOR Alfred Whittaker, Products Division only. Source for tv figures: TvB-Rorabaugh; network, LNABAR, 
who supervises $20 million for tv released by TvB. 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL l'.d 



VITH OLD-STYLE HEADACHES 




COMPANY SHUFFLES 15 BRANDS AND FOUR AGENCIES 



DCS&S 




Young & Rubicam 


BBDO 


Ogilvy, Benson & Mather 


IPANA 


VITALIS HAIR CREAM* 


SAL HEPATICA 


TRIG 


BAN 


IPANA PLUS 


MUM 


BUFFERIN 


TRUSHAY 




IPANA TOUCH-'N-BRUSH 


MUM MIST* 


EXCEDRIN** 







VITALIS THERADERM 

•Not currently advertised. "In test marketing. 



istribution and sales circle. These 
resent great growth potential in 
le Bristol-Myers product line (for 
11 products, see adjacent chart). 

Why? "Because all of our adver- 
ised products, except for Trig, al- 
|eady are among the top sellers in the 
roduct line." explains Mr. Whittaker. 
Mum Mist, Vitalis hair cream and 
■lieraderm dandruff remedy are not 
urrently being advertised.) Thus 
ihe biggest potential area of expan- 
sion is in the field of new products. 
(Two of the most promising in the 
.Sristol-Myers lines are the new Exce- 
ilrin, a headache remedy similar to 
iBufferin but with additional compo- 
lents which alleviate more severe 
ypes of pain, and Fortisun, a cold 
emedy with therapeutic ingredients 



mixed as an orange flavored powder 
which mixes with and dissolves into 
a beverage. 

Both items are being test marketed, 
Excedrin in the Michigan-Wisconsin 
and Denver areas, and Fortisun in a 
large market mass centered on San 
Francisco. Television spot is the 
primary advertising medium, supple- 
mented with print, and the company 
does not use any cut-ins on its four 
network shows during the testing. 

Television is allotted more than half 
of the Products Division's advertising 
appropriation, SPONSOR-estimated at 
some $40- S50-million in all, with 
$20.3 million for tv last year (see 
chart, page 38). Sal Hepatica's en- 
tire ad budget goes to spot tv; Buf- 
fering, more than 75^ of the allo- 



cation to spot and net tv. 

The shows sponsored by Bristol- 
Myers are Alfred Hitchcock (Sun- 
day. CBS TV) ; Producers Choice 
I Thursday, NBC TV. replacing 
Johnny Staccato) : Peter Gunn (Mon- 
day, NBC TV), and I've Got a Se- 
cret (Wednesday. CBS TV). The 
first is sponsored entirely by the 
company: the other three are co- 
sponsored with the R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co. 

Because of the importance of spot 
and network tv to product sales and 
to across-the-counter drug ite- 
ticularly, Mr. Whittaker is pe 
by the show control and cc 
of the medium. 

"For about the first ti le :ce tele- 
vision has been a majoi ledium, de- 



5PONSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



liver) is not being given us in the 
same proportion as the increase in 
I OSts. The cost per commercial min- 
ute i~ going lip, for time as well as 
talent, hut the results we get aren't 
m a t c h i n g these cost rises,"' he 
charges. 

W h) ? ''Because the network pie 
is being divided into three parts 
rather than two. This means de- 
liver) is less and the impact hasn't 
changed so that we've come out with 
quite a loss." He contends "some 
advertisers are staying in television 
onl\ by the skin of their teeth." 
Others, he thinks, will ultimately 
move to print or to radio unless the 
seller's market in tv either level or he- 
comes a buyer's market. He thinks 
spot suffers from this pie-splitting and 
as a result the announcement time 
slots themselves are increasingly diffi- 
cult to find and to buy. 

As a 52-week network program 
client, he's involved dailv in the has- 
sle as to whether the network or the 
advertiser or both assume ultimate 
program responsibility. "I don't like 
the extent to which I see networks 
taking control of programing. Ad- 
vertisers and networks should work 
together in contracting for and super- 
vising shows." He recommends that 
"every advertiser individually do his 
level best in opposing this trend. 

"" \ network cannot hope to know 
the individual requirements of its ad- 
vertisers to the extent that the adver- 
tiser himself does. Further, the stim- 
ulation and demand for better and 
varied programing on the part of 
agencies and advertisers, in addition 
to networks, will make for greater 
viewer pleasure and acceptance." 

He and his company have turned 
down programs — approved b\ net- 
works — because of their questionable 
content. "Nobod) is infallible, and 
nobody's taste is so good that they 
know all the answers. That"> win 
clients and networks should cooper- 
ate. It isn't healthy for broadcasting 
if the advertisers renounce responsi- 
bility or the networks usurp it." 

Taste and discrimination, as well 

as public responsibility, have been 

guide lines to Bristol-Myers manu- 

i Please turn to /'</#<> 54) 



'Music hath charms..." 



ART FORD'S 

'MILLION 

DOLLAR MUSIC" 

10-12 NOON, 4-6 PM 
WRCA 660 




,/ i 



SUBWAY CARD campaign for Art Ford, WRCA, New York, d.j., features shot of year-, 
lioness named Candy. Photos at right show Ford posing with beast for a future promot'r 



1 KNOW SHE WON'T 
BITE— BUT DOES 
SHE KNOW IT?' 



Vlive a promotional-minded station 
a lion and there's no telling where 
it'll stop — the station, that is. 

Case in point: WRCA, New York, 
the NBC Radio flagship, has been 
touting its new. soothing sound since 
it made its debut under the title of 
"wall-to-wall music" last July. 

Some of this new sound — which 
emphasizes fully-orchestrated music 
a la Percv Faith, Montavani, etc. — is 
aired under the aegis of Art Ford, 
whose two-hour segments in the late 
morning and late afternoon have been 
dubbed Million Dollar Music. Ford 
is a well-known name in New York 
and the station decided to take ad- 
vantage of the fact. 

What could be more natural than 
a music - hath - charms - to - soothe - the - 
savage-beast approach And. after all. 
what is more savage than a lion? 

Result: the station rented a 170-lb., 



year-old lioness named Candy frc 
the All-Tame lit says here) Aniir 
Agency. Accompanying the i 
to make sure that none of the Mai 
son Ave. types would turn pale w 
trainer Robert Deitch. 

The subway card, prepared 
Grey under the direction of art i 
rector Richard Loew and shot 
photographer Ramon Rosario (| 
picture above), was not the end ol 
Rosario also shot a series of pii 
licity stills with Ford and the Horn 
for a yet-to-be announced promotic 

The pictures at right give soi 
idea of what went on during the p 
ture-taking session. Not havi 
brought his 10-foot pole, Ford »j 
at first, rather wary about strikii 
up a conversation with the aniin 
Later, a warm friendship develope 
The parting, it was reported, was & 
bearably tearful. 1 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL VA 





"Okay, so snap already. Look, I'm "To paraphrase some famous 

holding a radio and she's eyeing last words, Robert, 'I know she v 
me with love. Can I go now?" bite— but does she know it?' " 



>n't know why I ever agreed to do this. I guess it 
^-because they told me it was a female." 





snest, I didn't mean it. This chick I got a 

e with doesn't mean a thing to me. Now, how about 

ing the camera? And puhlease, don't smile!" 



"Atagirl. I should have thought about turning 
>n the radio before. I didn't know you were so hot on 
Montavani. Say, is that purring — or your stomach?" 




HERE'S THE WAY SPONSC 



AM Association 



JUST ONE 
PRESIDENT? 

-DOES THE NAB 
NEED MORE? 



^ Problem of choosing successor to Hal 
Fellows raises doubts on NAB's structure 

^ 11 -year-old SPONSOR proposal for a 
Federated NAB gains broadcast support 

^Jtill unsettled at sponsor presstime this week is the 
troubling question — who will succeed Harold E. Fellows 
as president of the NAB? 

But conversations with responsible broadcasters, both at 
the Chicago convention and since, reveal a growing con- 
viction that the industry's dilemma goes far deeper than 
the naming of a man to fill this top post. 

Thoughtful radio and tv leaders are asking, "Is the NAB 
structure adequate for the industry's needs? Or has it 
evolved into a loose, formless operation which is diffused, 
confused, and overly expensive?" 

Most important, many station men are asking, "Should 
a new NAB organization plan be drawn, even before a new 
Association leader is chosen?" 

Doubts about NAB's basic structure are not new. In its 
issue of 6 June 1949 sponsor crusaded for a "Federated 
NAB" (see chart at right.) TheSPONSOR proposal attracted 
much industry attention but no action was taken on it. 

Now, with radio and television facing the most seri- 
ous challenges in their history, the idea of reforming the 
NAB as a fully functional, tightly integrated federation of 
broadcast associations is again gaining favor. 

Evidence of the problems which the present NAB struc- 
ture imposes on smooth functioning operation is seen in 
the current industry discussions on possible NAB presi- 
dential timber. 



AM Board of 
Directors 



Sales Promotion 



Engineering 



Researc 



Treasury 



Publicity 




Rates 



blueprint for 



ONSOR 6 JUNE 194? 



Some broadcasters are advancing the idea of a si 
tial "public figure"' to head up NAB activities, 
those mentioned: Adlai E. Stevenson, General Alfi 
Gruenther. ex-Senator and Ambassador Chester E 
Neil H. McElroy, even Dwight D. Eisenhower. It 
liably reported that at least two of the networks fav 
"public figure" approach. 

On the other hand, strong radio and tv factions are A 
ing out for the naming of an industry-trained leadei 
has the capacity to grow into the "public figure'" clas 

Prominently mentioned are such broadcast statesn eU 
Clair R. McCollough, NAB's Broadcaster of the Year; 1 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 10 



CHARTED A FEDERATED NA3 WAY BACK IN JUNE 1949 




•Id H. McGannon. pres. Westinghouse Broadcasting; Ward 
* Quaal, gen. manager of the WGN stations. Robert D. 
nvezey, formerly gen. manager of the WDSU stations. 

Behind the public figure vs. industry figure argument 
lies much genuine confusion about the ideal functioning 
»l the Association itself. 

It is generally agreed that in the future no one man 
'hould be asked to assume the backbreaking dual roles of 
^AB president and Chairman of the Board, held by Hal 
j ellows at the time of his death. 

! "Hal had to wear too many hats," was a general com- 
jient among broadcasters at the Chicago convention. "No- 



body can do all those jobs. The industry has grown so 
huge that no one man can possibly look out for tv. am. 
and fm on every front." 

sponsor's 1949 plan for a Federated NAB proposed an 
entirely different organization structure and one which, 
many experienced industry leaders now believe. \\ 
eliminated the diffusion of effort and costly splint* 
movements which have plagued NAB during the past 
decade. 

Though a number of developments in broadc. 
made obsolete some features of the 11-year-, : and 

although several important industry bodies have come into 



onsor • 23 APRIL 1960 



being since it was introduced — notably RAB. TvB. TIO — 
the basic features of the proposal are still timeh and 
practical. 

Essentially, sponsor's plan has these parts. 

1. Tlie establishment within the NAB of three separate 
1. 1.. .i.i. a-t a-.-ociations- a TV Association, an AM Associa- 
tion, and an FM Association. 

2. The establishment for each of these broadcast asso- 
ciations of its own nine-man board of directors, it own full- 
time president, and its own staff. 

!. The establishment of an over-all Federation Board of 
Directors and a Federation President's office with staff. 

4. The delegation to the individual broadcast associa- 
tions of all problems of engineering, promotion, program- 
ing, research, publicity, codes, rates, etc., which are pecu- 
liar to its own particular form of broadcasting. 

5. The delegation to the Federation Board, president, 
and staff, of all over-all industry problems, such as govern- 
ment relations, labor, industry relation, broadcast manage- 
ment, and legal matters involving the entire industry . 



6. The choice of presidents of the individual broadcas 
associations to be made on the basic of industry training 
business experience, administrative ability, and specifr 
knowledge of the problems affecting his own branch o 
broadcasting. 

7. Choice of the Federation President to be made oi 
the basis of his ability to represent the industry on all higl 
level governmental, public relations, international, legal 
and institutional matters. 

The logic of the sponsor proposal to divide the NA| 
into three separate broadcast associations for Tv, AM, an) 
FM, can be readily understood by any station owner whjj 
has tried running Tv and AM operations under a sing} 
management. 

During the early 1950 ? s, station men discovered that h 
e\ itably one or the other phase of their business was nej 
lected, and that the conflicting pressures could not 1) 
resolved until separate management units were set u 
Today, most tv and radio operations have their own ijj 
(Please turn to page 54 i 



SEVEN STEPS IN SPONSOR PLAN FOR FEDERATED NAB 



1 



3 



SEPARATE ASSOCIATIONS to be set up for each major branch of the broadcasting business — 
NATB for tv, NARB for am radio, NAFB for fm radio — all joined in an over-all NAB Federation. 



EACH INDIVIDUAL ASSOCIATION to have its otvn nine-man board of directors, its own full-time 
president, and its own staff to handle problems and activities pertaining to its form of broadcasting. 



AN OVER-ALL FEDERATION OFFICE to be established under a Federation Board of Directors, 
chosen from the individual associations, with full-time Federation President, a special president's staff. 



DELEGATION TO INDIVIDUAL ASSOCIATIONS of all problems of engineering, programing, 
research, publicity, codes, rates, etc., which are peculiar to that particular type of broadcasting. 



DELEGATION TO THE FEDERATION OFFICE, president, and staff, all over-all industry matters 
such as governmental, industry and public relations, legal and labor problems, international affairs. 



6 



CHOICE OF ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS to be made on the basis of industry training, business 
experience, administrative ability, leadership, and knowledge of a particular phase of broadcasting. 



7 



CHOICE OF FEDERATION PRESIDENT to be made on the basis of ability to represent the indus- 
try on all high-level governmental, public relations, international, institutional broadcasting matters. 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL B 




tenault snow romp ups sales 20% 



Tv commercials depicting the Dauphine's winter 
rformance spearhead French car firm's promotion 

"Winter Wonder Car" commercials reach some 
4 million viewers via CBS-TV's Olympics coverage 



urope-bound on the Liberie last 
ober, Renault account strategists 
n Kudner got a liberal education 
he Dauphine's winter advantages. 
3 snowballed into a mommoth 
ter promotion spearheaded by 
•quarter sponsorship of CBS-TV's 
mpics coverage — and a 20% sales 
» ease. 

* i'ealers from the northern U.S. in 
tl; group (awarded a trip abroad 
|j sales performance) extolled the 
c s ability to go in snow, start in 



cold weather, and keep passengers 
warm. Once back in the States, the 
newlv-enlightened Kudner team set 
to work on tv commercials playing 
up the winter theme. The plan was 
to run them on CBS-TV's Markham, 
sponsored on alternate weeks by 
Renault, and lend them to dealers. 

It was rough sledding in November 
with virtually no snow at the larger 
U.S. ski resorts. In early December 
the Kudner crew found adequate 
snow^ at Butte, Mont., but warm winds 



cut them short with meagre footage 
in the cans. By the week before 
Christmas they finally were able to 
resume operations, this time at Lake 
Placid, N. Y. 

Renault was so pleased with sam- 
ple footage it immediately called for 
a dealer-level promotion built around 
the not-yet-completed film commer- 
cials. Kudner responded with "Win- 
ter Sales Olympics." a promotion to 
tie in with the upcoming world-re- 
nowned sports event. No sooner was 
this idea developed when CBS-T\ 
announced that partial sponsorship 
of its Olympics coverage was avail- 
able. 

Kudner saw it as a made-L. 
vehicle for the winter pro- 
Renault wholeheartedly agre? I to the 
8440.000 outlay, and the deal was on. 

And what a deal it was! Nielsen 



'Insor • 23 APRIL 1960 




MADE-TO-ORDER shot of Dauphine 'at home' on Lake Placid ski slopes was a natural tor 
later-arranged one-quarter sponsorship of CBS TV's coverage of the I960 Winter Olympics 



cumulative figures show 78.6% of 
all tv homes watched the 10-day 
series six minutes or more. Based on 
three viewers per set, this comes to 
114,513,000 people. Nielsen's daily 
total audience rating ranged from 
17.1% to 43.3% of tv homes, the 
latter equivalent to 19,000,000 house- 
holds. The average minute audience 
was 21.7%, representing over 8,000,- 
000 homes — a network audience 
share amounting to 51.5%. Cost per 
thousand per commercial minute is 
computed at $1.59, compared to an 
average of $7.20 for this year's spe- 
cials and $4.98 for the highest rated 
special of the season. In the words 
of Kudner v.p.-account supervisor 
Jim Cochran, "This looks like the 
greatest advertising buy in television 
history."' 

As for the four one-minute com- 
mercials themselves, though shot be- 
fore anyone had an inkling of Olym- 
pics sponsorship they couldn't have 
been better suited for the assign- 
ment. The Dauphine is shown racing 
up and down ski resort hills, kicking 
up snow at the camera in its wake. 
It passes a snowplough on a hairpin 



curve or zooms by a horse-drawn 
sleigh, causing the animals to run at 
the sound of its horn. And. while 
the car is at rest at the foot of a 
steep hill, skiers whizz past from 
different directions. 

Dauphine was named official car 
of the 1960 Winter Olympics, and 
the Squaw Valley site was replete 
with 75 of them transporting partici- 
pants to and fro. Kudner made men- 
tion of this Olympics status in the tv 
commercials' audio, lending an extra 
boost to the "winter wonder car" 
theme. 

Dauphine's Olympics tie-in was 
focal point of the dealer-level promo- 
tion which ran from 21 January to 
29 February. Kudner supplied the 
dealers with voluminous kits of 
Olympics-oriented materials just two 
weeks after the promotion-sponsor- 
ship decision. 

Dealers were provided with a large 
red-white-and-blue "Olympics score- 
board" divided into four winter 
sports "events," each covering about 
10 days. Each was a separate sales 
incentive contest, with daily scores 
kept for the salesmen. After selling 



one car to qualify, the salesmen rj 
ceived extra cash for every car sol 
thereafter, beginning with 85 for to 
first and jumping $5 for each addi 
tional sale, leveling off at S25 per cai 
Top salesman for each 10-day coj 
test had his name inscribed on th 
scoreboard as "Le Gold Medal Wu) 
ner" and received 850. Low ma 
was listed in the "Le Bum" slot oi 
the scoreboard. 

To dealers went large red-whihj 
and-blue window posters with th 
Olympics daily telecast schedule anj 
word that they'd be sponsored l> 
Renault, "The Winter Wonder Car) 
There were tri-colored windojj 
streamers citing Renault as officm 
automobile of the 1960 Winter OlvJ 
pics. 

Included in the kit were sugge-t«'i 
radio scripts and print ads plugpuj] 
the Dauphine's winter features aJ 
Olympics official car status. The! 
were "conversation starter" sain 
men's badges with the words Renau 
and Winter Olympics. Detailed i| 
structions, including diagram, f 
setting up winter motif showrodj 
displays were sent, along with 
gestions on obtaining skis, ski rac 
manikins in ski clothes, winter 
sort travel posters, etc., for the 
hibit from local business people 
return for a display card gii 
credit to contributors. 

Among the other sales-aids shi] 
to dealers: 

• Different-color showroom 
dow "balloons," each listing 
nault winter feature, such as 
in Snow When Other Cars Won 
"Heater, No Extra Cost;" 
niatic Choke for Quick Cold Weal 
Starts." 

• Suggestions on how Ri 
dealers outside the snow-belt 
tie in with winter promotion by 
ing up Dauphine's performam i 
wet pavement, in slippery mui 
deep sand, and on rough dirt r 

• Renault Winter Olympic- 
cial car windshield stickers. 

• "Come in for Demonsti i 
window posters. 

• Special "Winter Sale? Olyi i 
stationery. 

• List of publicity suggestions 
as contests, tie-ins with local A 
athletics, etc. 



23 APRII I 



HOST AUDIENCE STUFFS BALLOT BOX 



WZIP, Cincinnati, takes case to the people when hit 
h zero rating; favorable responses exceed 16,000 

Station publishes results in booklet designed to set 
,ord straight for ratings-conscious national agencies 



I hard enough for a small radio 
•,on to land national business, but 
jng socked with a zero rating is 
5 too much. 

Let, that's what happened to 
IP, Cincinnati, a while ago — some 
ng outfit came up with a big goose 
for the "good popular music" sta- 
L Dismay blanketed the station 
the recent blizzard. How recon- 
this denial of audience existence 
i the steady stream of compli- 
tary phone calls and letters WZIP 
received from area listeners since 
ndoning rock and roll over a year 
? And, more pressing: How set 

1 record straight for the national 
icies which might well withhold 
ness on the basis of this mislead- 
report? 
et the listeners disprove the re- 
"t was the decision. WZIP pro- 
;d "ballots" via local newspaper 
that explained the situation, end- 
! with "tear-offs" its supporters 
|e urged to fill out and mail to the 
ion. At the latest count some 
)00 pro-WZIP ballots were in. 
ig with 3,000 letters and over 
30 phone calls which also endorsed 
station's better music approach to 
graming. 

'learly this was the antidote for 

deadly zero rating poison, but 

job was only partially done. The 

ngs-oriented industry now had to 

informed of the size, quality and 

fejhusiasm of WZIP's "non-existent" 

pjlience or the election victory would 

gifor nought. 

o do the job, station staffers pre- 
l?:ed a 16-page booklet, for mailing 
^national agencies, complete with 
t , ballot story plus a wealth of addi- 
J lial facts about the station. It also 
l 'luded a list of about 200 local ad- 
Mtisers represented on the station 



'n-sor • 23 APRIL 1960 



over the past six months — more local 
accounts than any other Cincinnati 
radio station, according to WZIP's 
calculations. 

While awaiting agency reaction, 
WZIP has been keeping things stirred 
up locally, "so they won't take us for 
granted," as sales v.p. Don Balsamo 
puts it. He and the others on the 
sales force have lugged piles of lis- 



SUBSTANTIAL BOOST for WZIP as thousands 
v.p. Don Balsamo is all smiles, but secretary Mai 



tener mail — in borrowed U. S. Gov- 
ernment white mail bags — to 23 agen- 
cies and several of the larger adver- 
tisers in and around Cincinnati. "We 
carried our listeners on our backs, 
and it was hard work," says Balsamo. 
"We wanted both agencies and adver- 
tisers to see and feel the evidence of 
our sizeable, enthusiastic group of 
listeners." 

In the work, too, is a mass mailing 
of "Thank You" letters for ballot 
casters, with WZIP automobile bump- 
er stickers enclosed. To get a more 
thorough breakdown on penetration 
by neighborhood, and therefore by 
audience economic position, the sta- 
tion plans to sort the mail received 
according to postal zone. ^ 



endorse under-rated station's programing. Sales 
ilyn Ayers needs a rest after opening all mail 




HIGBEE'S NIGHT RADIO JACKPOT 



^ Cleveland department -tore ?hoMca»e? recording* 
on twice weekly nighttime radio mimical spectaculars 

^ 30 »how» tint- far account for over S58.000 in 
music department -ale-, schedule to continue thru *60 



■ ■igbee's department store prob- 
ably has the largest record listening 
booth in the world. It extends over 
a 50-mile radius of Cleveland. Ohio, 
and it keeps open after the store has 
closed. 

Who populates this listening booth? 
Members of the radio audience for 
Higbee's nighttime music spectacu- 
lars. 

The Higbee music spectaculars, 
aired Monday and Thursday eve- 
nings, from 8-11 p.m.. have thus far 
:ed for more than §58.000 in 



store music department sales. They 
-:.2rted almost by chance from 
a one-time-only musical tribute to 
the late Mario Lanza, and have since 
mushroomed into a powerful selling 
tool for Higbee's. and manifest the 
faith in nighttime radio of Mai 
Jonas. Higbee's ad manager, and of 
Guv Harris, program director and 
Richard Klaus. v.p. of WERE. 

The Lanza special was aired by 
WERE on the evening of 8 October 
1959. Higbee's. a long-term adver- 
tiser on WERE, was offered sponsor- 



ship. The department store reast 
it would be a good buy in terms 
a public service vehicle, and wi i 
enhance its institutional image. Hoi 
ever, when d.j. Bill Randle. hos 
the show, suggested that listen* 
wanting to obtain the Lanza rec<| 
ings featured on the tribute 
either the station or the store, t 
switchboards were jammed with r-t 
for orders that finally tota 

Higbee's. hardly anticipating s« 
results even remotely approach^ 
this figure, had but three Lanza . 
bums in stock at the start of 
broadcast. However, the store m 
quick to realize the potential a s 
of like music spectaculars held : 
increasing record sales, and quid 
huddled with station men and 
cussed the idea of sponsoring 
programs on a regular weekly b^ 

Inasmuch as nearlv 100 new | 



CHOOSING ALBUMS, -cc -g :-- r-c;-a- = 
project, undertaken here by Dick Klaus, WERE i 



-C" : = :i:-:.-: '--"c — a-' 
: 9. . -a--"s z-:z-z- z -if 




23 APRIL ll 



are received a week by Hig- 
s music department, they cannot 
ye displayed advantageously. The 
e felt that showcasing a series of 
ted disks on nighttime radio 
Id be an excellent wa\ of pro- 
ing many of these albums that 
B not enjoying the popularit) they 
ht if the public were more aware 
hem. 

arris and Klaus, spurred on by 
tremendous success of the first 
tacular, were already busy de- 
ping a second one when they met 
Higbee's. Store representatives 
_e the green light to the venture, 
one week after the first broad- 
the second music spectacular 
aired, 
"he album chosen for '"spectacu- 
treatment was the RCA-Victor 
ise 60 Years of Music America 
is Best. Out for two months, 
disk had been described by re- 
ding company officials as "mildly 
;essful." How well did Higbee's 
;ic department do with the rec- 
Officially. 14,899.38 were rung 
;in cash register sales that resulted 
?ctl\ from the WERE broadcast. 
The series was thus launched in 
id style. The sponsor was so 
sed with the week-by-week results 
eafter that the spectacular sched- 
was upped to two-a-week after 
first of the year. Random results 
:e then : On the 25th of February 
s were $1,188.10; the 3rd of 
rch, s8.474.70; 31 March, 
87.20. and on 11 April, $1,165. 
Higbee's has signed to sponsor 
t spectaculars through December, 
1.0. 

he spectaculars themselves are by 
i means haphazard affairs that ram- 
| on for three hours, but tightlv 
k t, planned-in-detail programs with 
-Sicific aims. Harris, music librarian 

a" It Maskv. and Carl Reese, who 
v hosts the shows, meet every 
day afternoon to discuss selections 
* upcoming programs. Each show 
limade up from three albums that 
| together thematically and/or artis- 
supplied by Masky 
rmation on both 
music and artists. Harris, who 



■• i"£.ciuci uieiiiaucan 

Willy. Reese is suppl 
^W|h background infori 



■iwledge the M.C. has of his mate- 

IL the more sincere his on-the-air 

1 Please turn to page 76) 

J 'NSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



L^J^ 


* -^-!^ 









BARGAIN promotion by WAST (TV), Albany, for "This Man Dawson: hotdog bag insert 

$70 IN MERCHANDISING 
REACHES 100,000 HOMES 



t\ meat packer's hot dogs are at 
work publicizing a television show. 

It all started when Armour & Co. 
took on sponsorship of This Man 
Dawson (Ziv-UA) over WAST {TV), 
Albany, N. Y. The show was new to 
this market and needed exposure. 
Station and client were agreed that 
point-of-sale should be employed. 
Large signs in every supermarket and 
grocery store would do it, but so Her- 
culean a task seemed out of the ques- 
tion. 

The WAST promotion department 
decided to investigate the publicity 
potentialities of Armour's fast-mov- 
ing, one-pound frankfurter packages. 
From Armour local people it was 
learned that some 100,000 packages 
would be sold during the spring. Here 
was an effective, if unique, outlet to 
publicize the show and thus expose 
Armour's many other products to 
viewers. 

\\ VST offered to pay for printing 
50,000 inserts in the packages if the 
advertiser would pay for the remain- 
der. Armour agreed and also took on 
the expense of additional packaging 
involved. The station contributed the 
original and finished art work. 

Right into the packages went the 
Dawson message, printed on high 



gloss paper, easily readable through 
the clear wrapper. It was placed be- 
hind cardboard so as not to touch the 
frankfurters, since paper that touches 
food must undergo special treatment 
— and that costs mone\ . 

Cash outlay by WAST for this 
widespread show promotion: $70. 
The cost fits in neatly with the WAST 
philosophy that requests by adver- 
tisers for promotion merchandising 
"extras" when they buy air time are 
getting out of hand. WAST promo- 
tion manager Michael Artist does not 
feel stations should get very far into 
merchandising of the product itself. 
In his words, '"The primary purpose 
of a promotion manager is to pro- 
mote the show so that the client's 
message on the air will get the larg- 
est exposure possible." 

As for promotion methods. Y\ V.ST 
has its doubts about direct mail. Saj - 
Artist. "There is something to he said 
for direct mail of jumbo sized post- 
cards or merchandising letters; if and 
when they are read, they do in! 
But how main times are they : 
W 1ST looks on its Dawson 
tion as an example of hov a little 
money spent selectively can achieve 
"far more than several hundred mail- 
ings would have done." ^ 






KYWis way up 
in Cleveland! 

KYW influences more sales than any 
ether radio station in the nation's 
sixth market in Total Retail I 
Size it up -KYW is your No. 1 rat 
buy in Ohio's No. 1 market. 
Represented by AM Radio Sales I 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., Int 




National and regional b 
in work now or recently compU 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Pharma-Craft Corp., sub. of Jos. Seagram & Co., Cranbury, \ 
Going into the top markets with schedules for Fresh deodorant, 
and late night minutes and 20s are being used starting the last \ 
in April for 26 weeks, including hiatus. Frequencies range from 
to 25 spots per week per market. Buyer : Diane Neugarten. AgeJ 
Daniel & Charles, Inc.. New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Campaign begins latt 
month for Aerosol air deodorant. Schedules are for four weeks, 
time and nighttime I.D.'s. Buyer: Elenore Scanlon. Agency: 
& Finney, Inc., New York. 

Norwich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N. Y.: Buying nighttime ; 
utes and chainbreaks in the top markets for Pepto-Bismol. Schecj 
start 9 May for six weks. Buyer: Jack Scanlon. Agency: Bent^ 
Bowles, New York. 
E. I. Du Pont DeNemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington: Sehe< 
for its paint products beign late April and May. depending i 
ket. weather conditions. Fringe weekday minutes and 20s. and w 
end runs are being placed for four to six weeks. Buyer : Jack Coj 
Smith. Agency: N. W. Ayer & Son, Philadelphia. 
DC A Food Industries, Inc., New York: About 80 markets 
schedules for its Gold Mine icicle and Gold Mine stick confe 
novelties. Kid show participations are being used primarily. 
May through the end of June. Other activity is on its Minute 
Orange Bar, where similar schedules are being bought on a ms 
by-market basis as DCA expands distribution. Buyer: Stew H: 
Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. 
Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Schedules for Lustre-C 
Shampoo start this month for four weeks. Prime minutes and 
are being placed in about eight markets, light frequencies. l?M 
Harrv Durando. Agency: Lennen & Newell, New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Diamond National Co., New York: Lining up summer sche 
to start 22 May for one week and 26 June for four and five weel 
Neet Heet Charcoal Briquettes. Traffic minutes, and news and s 
show adjacencies are being set in an estimated 40 markets. Is 
Virginia Burke. Agency: Gardner Adv., New York. 
Rolley Co., San Francisco: Campaign for Tanfastic sun tan ■ 
starts in a number of top markets 16 May for eight weeks. 
I.D.'s and minutes in d.j. shows with strong teen-age appeal e 
bought. Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding. San Francisco. 
Standard Brands Inc., New York: Short-term schedules start 1 
week in April for Royal desserts. Traffic and daytime minutej 
chainbreaks will run for three weeks in the top markets. Buy 
Decker. Agency : Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRI J 



o Get to 

HONEYED 
HOUSEHOLDS 



Houston. Dallas, Los Angeles — 
rich markets, yes. But they pale in 
power compared with Baton Rouge. 
Louisiana's second market in size is 
first in effective buying income per 
household. To blanket the buyers, 
buy two in Louisiana — one for 
size, and 2 in Baton Rouge for 
quality. 




ATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA 

f ER: lOOl FT. POWER 100.000 WATTS 




in LOUISIANA 



Buffalo, N.Y. 



*$65I0 



BATON ROUGE 



$6455 



Albany-Troy, Schenectady $6420 



Houston, Texas 



$6310 



Los Angeles, Long Beach $6306 



Dallas, Texas 



$6229 



Utica-Rome, N.Y. 



$5930 



SHREVEPORT 



$5796 



NEW ORLEANS 



$?. ■ 



As media become more competitive, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What has been your most successfu 

sales-producing plan' 



Three tv station people give 
views as to the kind of promo- 
tions most likely to win new 
advertisers for the video medium 

H. Needham Smith, national sales 
manager, WTRF-TV, Wheeling. W, Va. 
B\ far the most successful tv sell- 
ing tool we ha\e used for new ad- 




vertisers on WTRF-TV has been tele- 
vision itself. Not on-the-air tv. nat- 
urally, but a closed circuit version 
tailored for the potential new adver- 
tiser and, more important, for his 
product. 

Closed circuit tv has been used for 
many purposes and we have found 
that the presentations we made on 
closed circuit tv had an exceptionally 
high sales completion value. So much 
so. that during one period WTRF- 
T\ . in a total of 15 closed circuit 
presentations to prospective adver- 
-igned contracts with 13 of the 
15, and received tentative approval 
from the other two for future use. 

I he idea for using closed circuit 
t\ for these presentations started with 
our executive vice president and gen- 
eral manager. Robert W. Ferguson, 
who had been impressed with the use 
of closed circuit by the networks and 
many industrial organizations, par- 
ticularly those to sales groups. He 
felt that the interest it developed for 
huge outfits might work equally well 
with -mailer companies— particularly 
local advertisers who had never tried 
tv advertising before. 

Consequently, we developed the 
\\ TRF-TN closed circuit presenta- 
tion. Basically it i- a combination 
educational and selling presentation. 
Main local businessmen are unfa- 



miliar with the terminology of tv so 
our educational phase of the closed 
circuit presentation is designed to 
inform the prospect as to the rudi- 
mentary uses of tv for advertising 
purposes. 

We discuss tv terminology, explain 
and describe the various spots. I.D.. 
slides, film. etc. W hen we feel the 
businessman understands the general 
idea of tv advertising we make our 
sales pitch, why tv should be used. 
how effective it can be for his product, 
what it has done for similar adver- 
tisers in other markets, promotional 
and merchandising advantages, and 
other sales data. 

The prospect is first invited to the 
station for the closed circuit presen- 
tation by an account salesman. He 
sits in the viewing room while the 
presentation, which has been specially 
tailored for his benefit, is telecast live 
from the WTRF-TV studio. 

The presentation is a four-part op- 
eration: analysis of the market from 
the client's viewpoint, comparative 
analysis showing advantages of using 
television over other media, sample 
commercials, spot and program avail- 
abilities. All of these parts utilize 
original material created for this one 
presentation by the WTRF-TV staff. 

Any questions the prospect has 
concerning what he is watching are 
taken up bv either the station mana- 
ger or myself, and he is made to feel 
that all of the facilities of the station 
are at his disposal. The various types 
of commercials — filmed, cartoon, live. 
voice over, etc.. are discussed with 
the client so that he max select the 
most suitable ones, and his preferences 
are recorded for future use. 

The "personalized" approach given 
each prospective advertiser has been 
extremely effective. Many of the ad- 
vertisers were unfamiliar with the 
routine of television advertising and, 
more important, were unaware of the 
advertising potential of that medium. 
With the closed circuit presentation, 
much of their lack of knowledge has 
been dispelled, and the\ have gained 



a new insight into the medium a 
it- potential. 

William Scruggs, promotion dir*c 

WSOC-TV, Charlotte. .V. C. 
A 21-minute color slide prefel 

tion, which we produced for the s 
purpose of telling the story ab 
''The Big New Picture in Charloi 
WSOC-TV," has been our most $ 
cessful sales-producing plan. I ti 
ing a coordinated tape recording 
narration, this presentation told ' 
complete story of our station's i 
to the Cox Enterprises, presented 
new building and facilities, descrij 
the many new film properties recei 
purchased, introduced our on-thef 
personalities, and afforded each vj 
er a pictorial tour of the impel 
Charlotte market. 

Another important role of I 
slide presentation was to present 
describe the multi-phase promo 
and merchandising program 
WSOC-TV proudly affords its 
tisers. Presented visually, with 
propriate commentary, this poj 
of our presentation brought 
sharp focus a big "plus" of our < 
all operation which might easib 
gone unnoticed in, say. a printed 
motion piece. 

Through the splendid cooped 
of our sales representatives, 
small groups of important Bf 




personnel were invited to se: 
hear our story in New "l ork 
their questions answered. an< 
join us for lunch afterwards, 
reminder of the occasion, impi 
ball point pens were given b 
person in attendance. \ ariati ■ 
this procedure were also used V 



23 APRII 



on to key agencies in Chicago 
iincinnati. 

r sales representatives tell us 
in their follow-up calls at the 
ies, they noticed the effects of 
iresentation on those who had 
led — instant recall of our sta- 
ind the complete services avail- 
lt'ie. the sales potential of the 
otte market, and an actual de- 
) learn more. 

ite obviously, then, an effective 
aroducing plan for the station 
necessity, the first step toward 
ig and later satisfying both lo- 
ld national clients. Once they 
n the air, other custom-tailored 
producing plans are put into ac- 
:o secure maximum results for 
nt. 

re satisfied that our slide pres- 
i played an important role in 
:nt sales surge at our station, 
any new advertisers are using 
ilities for the first time and 
irch sales have topped every 
s month on WSOC-TV. 



R hh Schlanger, promotion manager, 
t WKTV, Utica-Rome, N. Y. 

recent WKTV sales-producing 






which 



from its primary 



S 



Sales-producing 
gimmicks need 
not be 
costly 



i tion of increasing sponsor sales) 
a .lit two valuable lessons: that ef- 
e \e sales-producing gimmicks need 
»< he costly — nor terribly involved; 
u that "selling" to youngsters 
I lid not be under-rated, 
he sponsor in this instance was 
, world, a local toy shop which 
I purchased a weekly half hour 
;i lie show^ on WKTV. The pro- 
Si n. shown from noon to 12:30 on 
'• mlays, consisted of a variety of 
U|ed cartoons interspersed with live 

I mercials. 

|he kiddie show itself was not 

II (ue. Nor were the toys displayed 
I mercially: they were items gen- 
Ijl) stocked in retail toy shops 
M where in the locale. The sur- 

ig sales-producing implement 
was an unimpressive appearing 
{Please turn to page 76) 




*7 TV 

MARKET 
IN THE 
NATION 



$2,000,000,000 IN RETAIL SALES 

WOC -TV serves the largest market between Chicago 
and Omaha . . . Minneapolis and St. Louis. 438,480 
TV homes; almost $3 billion in effective buying in- 
come; over $1 billion gross farm income. 

And to help you get the maximum number of these 
dollars WOC-TV specializes in effectively co-ordin- 
ating and merchandising your buy at every level — 
the broker, wholesaler, direct salesman, key buyer 
as well as the retail outlet. 

Further proof of aggressiveness — WOC-TV offers 
the greatest amount of local programming — over 
33 hours each week. 



Your PGW Colonel has all the 
facts, figures and other data as 
well as day by day availabil- 
ities. See him today. 



fc§3 


,T.c™cU,Sr 


THE QUINT CITIES 

DAVENPORT 1 
BETTENDORF / '° WA 

ROCK ISLAND "1 
EAST MOLINE J 


rs™ ■£> 



New,exeitiR^ ^S 
Itiusie 




VSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



SPOT CARRIERS 

i Continued from page 37 I 

and one drops out. it is still five- 
-i\lhs sold. 

Be\ ond the economics is still an- 
other reason for spot carriers: it is 
proving a good way to achieve net- 
work show control I See "Which 
Road for Tv Show Control.'" SPONSOR 
2 April), and this is a legacy that 
networks are now inheriting — with 
the blessings of FCC. 

For some idea of how the spot-car- 
rier concept has taken hold, here is 
a look-in on ABC TV's line-up for 
next season. I Among the networks, 
no one values program control more 
highly than does ABC TV I . 

Adventures in Paradise, next seas- 
on, becomes a spot carrier; it will in- 
clude the following list of sponsors: 
L & M. Armour. Ludens. Johnson & 
Johnson. Bulova. Seven-Up. Revnolds 
Metals. Anahist, Polaroid Cameras, 
Du Pont, and Isodine. 

Another new spot carrier coming 
up on this network is Jubilee USA. 
Its clients include: Massey Ferguson, 
Williamson Dickie. Polk Miller, and 
National Carbon Co., a division of 
Union Carbide & Carbon. Shows on 
the same network, which this year 
are spot carriers, pick up additional 
sponsors, and the list is like a tear 
sheet from Wall Street Journal. 

The Alaskans, for example, will 
serve as an hour-long vehicle for: 
L & M, Johnson & Johnson, Seven-Up, 
Armour, National Carbon, Anahist. 
Ludens, Corning Glass. Bulova, Du 
Pont, and P&G. 

Cheyenne takes on a distinguished 
list of clients: Ralston-Purina, P&G, 
American Chicle, National Carbon, 
Armour. Johnson & Johnson. Corning 
Glass, Anahist, and Mattel Toy Co. 
Bourbon Street Beat will be under- 
written by buys from Van Heusen 
Shirts. P. Lorillard Tobacco. Libbv- 
Owens-Ford, Reynolds. Anahist, and 
Isodine. 

It is interesting to note in the ABC 
TV schedule how frequently the same 
names of top advertisers keep turning 
up on spot carrier shows. Joining 
them are others such as Canada Dry, 
Carnation and Whitehall. Apparently 
these like the "conditions as prevail." 

As long as these conditions prevail, 
practically no one in the industry 
looks forward to an abatement of the 
net spot carrier practice. ^ 

54 



BRISTOL-MYERS 

(Continued from page 40) 

facturing and advertising for main 
years. This may explain partially 
why many other drug-makers and 
their Madison Avenue ad represent- 
atives are in a frenzied state in the 
wake of governmental investigations 
. . . and why Bristol-Myers isn't. 

One company executive tells this 
anecdote as illustrative of the com- 
pany's attempts at stringent self reg- 
ulation and ethical operations. 

William Bristol, co-founder of the 
company in 1887, was offered a 
money -making idea by a staff chemist 
in the early years of the company. 
The offer: a quinine pill double the 
standard size but containing only a 
third of the standard dosage of the 
drug. Profits, obviouslv, would have 
been tripled. Within 10 minutes 
after the idea had been presented, 
the chemist was given his final pay- 
check and sent on his way. 

The company started as an ethical 
house and switched into over-the- 
counter items when it realized some 
eight brands out of 4,000 were carry- 
ing most of the sales load. Since 
that time. Bristol Laboratories Divi- 
sion has responsibility for the ethical 
products and the Products Division 
for the consumer items. Still other 
divisions are International, Luzier 
(a door-to-door cosmetics operation i . 
Clairol l purchased from the owners 
a year ago) and Grove Labs, (taken 
over by the corporation two years 
ago). 

The company keys its success and 
its growth to three factors: faith in 
advertising, product planning and 
people, says Mr. Whittaker. Its faith 
in advertising has been long evident. 
It was one of the nation's first three 
network radio sponsors in 1925, buy- 
ing the Ipana Troubadours and then 
becoming identified with such classics 
as Fred Allen and his Town Hall 
Tonight, Eddie Cantor, Duffy's Tav- 
ern and Mr. District Attorney. ^ 



■ SPOT-BUV 
FACTS NOT ON THE 
RATE CARD ABOUT 
KPIX, SAN FRANCISCO 



FEDERATED NAB 

{Continued from page 44) 

dividual managing groups. 

Similar conflicts of interest will al- 
ways exist within the NAB until 
there are clear-cut organizations 
dedicated to the welfare of each of 
the several branches of the business. 

As to the financing of a Federated 




MOST NEWSCASTS DF 

ALL SAN FRANCiXO 
TV STATION'S 




And that's not all! ■ Only over all rating gain 
scored by a San Francisco TV station in 1959 
■ Most total advertisers of all San Francisco TV 
stations ■ Most national advertisers of all San 
Francisco TV stations ■ Most local live shows of 
San Francisco TV stations ■ That's why, IN 
AN FRANCISCO, NO SPOT l/niV C 
CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE IV I I A © 
WITHOUT THE WBC STATION, SAN FRANCISCO 
Represented by Television Advertising Representatives, Inc. 
£<S@ WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



\ \l>. details of dues and member- 
ship fees would have to be worked 
out in close consultations between 
member groups. 

As a principle, however, the spoiv- 
sor plan proposes that each broad- 
cast association allocate a fixed per- 
centage of its income (perhaps 20$ I 
to financing the Federation office, 
president and staff, and that the bal- 
ance be devoted to its own tv, am, or 
fm work. 

The clear-cut division of activities 
between the Federation and individ- 
ual associations would, main broad- 
casters believe, sharpen up the whole 
range of NAB work. 



Send us your views 

Do you agree with SPON- 
SOR'S proposal for a Feder- 
ated NAB? Please write us 
your reactions to this plan, 
as ivell as any other sugges- 
tions you may have for the 
reorganization of the NAB. 




For years, the NAB departments 
which have attracted most favorable 
comments from member stations have 
been labor and governmental rela- 
tions. 

Other NAB activities have been 
frequentlv under fire, and in fairness 
to the NAB staff, it must be admitted 
that the diffusion of responsibilities 
and objectives, inherent in the cur- 
rent association structure, have made 
effective operations difficult if not im- 
possible. 

The creation of separate, but fed- 
erated associations I called possibly 
NATB, NARB. and NAFBt would 
focus and channel activities pertain- 
ing to tv. am. and fm and should im- 
prove them. 

On the other hand the removal of 
day-to-day operating problems from 
the province of the Federation's presi- 
dent would free him to represent the 
industry, as it should be represented, 
on high-echelon levels. 

As to the composition of tl 
all Federation Board, the 
plan proposes that nine be 

chosen from the three :ast as- 

sociations, with repr< tion allo- 

cated roughh to dollar 

[Please turn to page 70 i 

55 



RADIO BASICS /APRIL 

Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



1960 


1959 


50.1 ~E 
radio 

..... | 


radio 
homes 


1 

52.0 

U.S. homes 


I 

51.4 
U.S. homes 


am*ii™ 


0. SPONSOR: 1 Mir. 



Radio set index 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

To fa I 



1960 


1959 


106.007,095 
40.387.449 
10.000.000* 


98.300.000 
37.900.000 

10.000.000* 



156.394.544 146.200.000 







Radio station 


index 








End of March 


1960 








Stations CPs not 


New station 


bids in hearing* 


Am 
Fm 


1 


3.465 1 81 
706 | 161 

End of March 


609 

1959 


1 231 
1 34 


Am 

Fm 


1 


3.344 1 123 
594 | 141 


1 4% 
1 49 


1 130 
1 24 






hfe reports. commercial Malta 


'February, each 


year. 







Radio set sales 


index 




Trpe 


:>: 
n 


Feb. 19S0 


Feb. 1959 


2 rronths 
1960 


2 months 
1959 


Home 

Auto 


611.579 
596.872 


474.888 
420.052 


1.414.867 
1.229.333 


1.175.378 
852.603 


Total 

figures are 


1J>08.351 

ironic Industries 
torr product ion. 

d another ii-id" 


894.940 2.644.200 

a •- Banc ;;.::• ire -rs:.-i:ii 
These figures are of U.S. production 

■ -._ * - - -i.<~ if - • 


2.027.981 
retail tales, ant* 
Radial :-. 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 

How out-of-home listening differs by stations 







1 M.o.ur.d ! M.osur.d 
ll'llVI. i Our-"©, Horn. In- Horn. j Out-O.-Hom. 




Sin A p" ^ : o 8| i^Ota 5tn A [7*6 "j]o.l 




B | 3 0.9 | «^c B [3 09] 




C ^ | 8| «~ C I2 8 6] 




D 

E 


2 3 : 7| t* im< D 


2 3 1 0j 




2 3 J A NtaiM. E 


2 3 J 0.7| 




Pulse figures 
lei els. Chart 
portioned ace 
Data are bas 


above show that out-of-home levels don't bear any necessary relationship to in-home 
at left indicates how stations would fare if the general level of out-of-home teas ap- 
ording to the in-home level. Chart at right shows the actual out-of-home listening level. 
'd on December 1959 New York Metro Pulse. 1-1:15 p.m.. Monday through Friday 








SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 






TOGETHERNESS ... Big WOW Radio Variety 



The GENTLEMEN who sell radio advertised 
products to (or buy them for) retail outlets are 
V.I.P. in BIG Radio WOW's daily operation. Big 
Radio WOW knows the 

Chain-store buyers . . . Manufacturer's Agents 
.... "Rack" Jobbers .... District Managers . . 

Brokers Company Salesmen 

Wholesalers Distributors .... 

Can ''make or break" any advertising campaign. 

So, BIG RADIO WOW keeps these GENTLE- 
MEN on BIG RADIO WOW's side. WOW keeps 



REGIONAL RADIO 

A MEREDITH STATION 



them FULLY INFORMED on every campaign 
detail. Each of them knows the entire BIG RADIO 
WOW story. 

To cement this 'togetherness" BIG RADIO 
WOW meets with groups of these GENTLEMEN 
almost every week. They listen eagerly to 
campaign details. 

They sell your product better because BIG 
RADIO WOW keeps their interest at a high peak. 
BIG Radio WOW knows that selling these 
GENTLEAIEN hypos company loyalty and in- 
creases vour sales. 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 




KIM HUNTER AND DANE CLARK IN THE CLOSING DOOR OH "THE PLAY OF THE WEEK"-AN NTA RELEASE 




It's "SCOTCH" BRAND Video Tape "Live" Action ft 



or 



THE PLAY OF THE WEEK 



l~l Television is proving its potential again this 
season to viewers across the nation. Each week 
" The Play of the Week", a highly-acclaimed 
dramatic series, presents a theater classic with a 
cast of top Broadway talents. Integral to the show 
is "Scotch" brand Video Tape, used by the 
show's producers, National Telefilm Associates, 
Inc., i" capture the "live" perfection of the origi- 
nal performance. Tapes are then used for rebroad- 
cast by television stations from coast to coast. 
I | And so it goes throughout the television industry. 




Memorable moments as well as "hard-sell" co 

mercials are being captured on tape in increa?i 

numbers. The wonder of tape pares product i 

costs substantially, creates "fluff-free perfor 

ances. permits flexibility in rehearsals and sh« i 

I ing. Is it any wonder that tape has revolutioniz 

the television industry? fj "Scotch" br\ 

Video Tape, like audible range and instrumenj 

tion tapes, was pioneered by 3M research— t 

kind of research that keeps 3M magnetic prodi < 

in proved quality for professional i»s 



M" 



i M ,N,M6 * ND M*» 



S( OTCH"ud the Plan) Design are Registered Trademarks of 3M Co., St. Paul 6. Mil 

58 



[it to roMottow«S^HB^Hr 

. Export: 99 Park Ave.. New York. Canada: London, Ontario, g I960 3." I 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1 9B 



Whafs happening in V. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



* WASHINGTON WEEK 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



For salty examples of how Congress fails to support its homilies, take the ac- 
tion of the House Appropriations Independent Offices subcommittee on funds for 
the FTC and FCC. 

After all the haranguing for the press about ad policing in tv and radio, this contingent 
of congressmen slashed the FTC's requested appropriation by $185,000. 

The money asked by the FCC was clipped by $385,000, thus cutting out half the 
new people the FCC wants. 

The subcommittee, however, did allow $2 million — $2.5 million had been asked — for the 
construction of uhf facilities in New York to find out whether they can work there. 

Congress plays it both ways. There is always a receptive press when somebody attacks 
the work of a regulatory agency. But if the agency seems to be getting too energetic, 
there is little public notice of the fact that Congress is tightening the pursestrings. 

Although the FTC has been kept from "crusading" in this manner in the past, there is 
some doubt that the trick will work this time. 

Present FTC chairman Earl W. Kintner, backed by the other commissioners, doesn't in- 
tend to pull in his ad-probing horns for anti-monopoly, anti-merger, or anything else. 



While he appears to wobble in his speeches from a self-regulation-is-grand attitude to a 
government-big-stick position, he has charted a clear course. Radio/tv commercials will 
be scanned as never before, but the bigger share of commission attention will be devoted 
to printed ads. There is no doubt that Kintner thinks the print media have been play- 
ing up the broadcasting scandals for their own benefit. 

Given Kintner's attitude, Congress can dissuade him from paying too much attention to 
advertising only through affirmative direction, rather than the backdoor withholding of funds, 
and Congress will not be that forthright. 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee and 
of its Legislative Oversight subcommittee, also weighed pulling a sneaker. 

With no time left in the current Congressional session to push the controversial proposals 
to tighten up payola, plugola, rigged quizzers, to provide fines and temporary suspensions of 
station licenses for rules violations, to hold hearings in the areas to be served on all license 
applications, Harris mulled a bypass method. 

He planned to tack at least some of these proposals to a bill already passed by the Senate 
so that it would go directly to conference and need not be the subject of hearings in the other 
chamber. However, firm NAB and CBS opposition to most of the Harris recommen- 
dations makes it unlikely that this course can be successful. The Senate Commerce 
Committee would probably not want to rubberstamp without hearings anything which has 
violent opposition. 

Harris was quite unhappy with NAB and CBS opposition, told NAB it would do better 
to help secure needed changes in the groundrules rather than standing firmly on the status quo. 
His irritation may have been caused by a feeling that opposition would block him for this year. 

Meanwhile, Harris and the FCC Commissioners did appear to agree that record com- 
pany gifts of single records to broadcasters, with no assurance they would be used, 
is not payola but is a bona fide business procedure. 

So it appears that, even if Congress doesn't act, the FCC will correct its 16 March payola 
directive, at least in this respect. 



• 23 april 1960 



59 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



23 APRIL I960 

Cwyrlght I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



One of the last places in broadcasting where such a thing as a time franck 
still exists is in regional syndication where established buyers have obtained cc 
trol of local half-hours in many markets. 

Regional and national spot advertisers who control local time through long standing 8" 
dication franchises include these: Falstaff, Borax, Ballantine, Standard Oil (Calif 
Carnation, Kellogg, Standard Oil (Indiana), Kroger, and DX Sunray. 



ITC has made a very unusual re-run deal with NBC TV for Fury. 

NBC TV gets 52 episodes of the series for two years in weekend telecast, but ITC 
tains syndication rights for the show on weekday nights under the title Brave Stallion. 

In syndication, Brave Stallion is already in 114 markets. 

Incidentally, some other sales tallies of recent re-runs in syndication are: CBS FiL 
Phil Silvers, 126 markets, and Trackdown, 62 markets, and Ziv's Highway Patrol, 
markets. 



In two important top personnel changes this week Robert Seidelman was elt 
ed v.p. in charge of syndication at Screen Gems and Ira Gottlieb became the pn 
dent of Flamingo. 

Seidelman has been Screen Gems syndication director since last fall; his new post is 
one formerly occupied by Jerry Hyams, Screen Gems v.p. and general manager. 

Gottlieb's elevation to the presidency of Flamingo followed the resignation of Herflj 
Rush, who has left to take on production assignments. 



ITC's Sweet Success, now sold in 40 markets, has a high percentage of bai 
and financial institutions among its local advertisers. 

Here are six: Detroit Bank and Trust (WWJ-TV), Anchor Securities (KXLY-TV, S)| 
kane), Santa Barbara Trust Deed & Mortgage (KEY-T), San Diego Trust & Mortf 
(XETV), and Denver Trust Deed & Mortgage (KLZ-TV, Denver). 



The ratings strength of some syndicated shows continue to grow as 
stays on the air for subsequent seasons in its markets. 

Screen Gems' Rescue 8, for example, has scored higher ARB ratings this year, 
second season, than it did during the same months in 1959. 

Here are six markets where the ratings increase was pronounced : 

CITY MARCH 1960 ARB MARCH 1959 . 

Philadelphia 

Milwaukee 

Portland 

Chicago 

Seattle-Tacoma 

Indianapolis 



the sflv 
the sh|'i 

ARB I 



60 



24.0 




22.6 


37.1 




25.6 


24.2 




18.0 


13.2 




10.0 


26.9 




17.7 


20.9 




13.1 




SPONSOR 


• 23 APRIL 



: 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Canadian and Australian broadcasters will capitalize on the fact that they'll tele- 
cast CBS Films' Robert Herridge Theater before the show is seen in the U. S. 

A Canadian or Australian premiere of a U. S. show is unusual and becomes a broadcast- 
er's point of prestige. 



COMMERCIALS 



An analysis of the first 600 commercials received as entries in the American Tv 
Commercials Festival and Forum gives a cross-section of the type of products and 
entrants that are participating. 

By product, the count is: cars, 66; consumer service, 60; beer, 58; gas & oil, 34; ciga- 
rettes, 34; institutionals, 24; cosmetics, 22; meat, 22; apparel, 20; hair preparations, 18; pre- 
pared food, 16; paper goods, 16, and coffees, 14. 

Here's who's entering: agencies, 54; producers, 36, and advertisers, 6. 

These are other details: 40 entries were in color, 160 were regional and 68 local, and 
24 were Canadian ; also, 194 entries included requested information on advertising purposes. 



Robert Lawrence Productions will install two RCA tv tape recorders and three 
Marconi cameras in its Toronto studios. 

However, Lawrence won't install any tape equipment in its U. S. studios, since it will be 
able to use Ampex equipment at the stations of its affiliate, RKO: WOR-TV, New York; 
KHJ-TV, Los Angeles; CKLW-TV, Detroit; WNAC-TV, Boston, and WHBQ-TV, Memphis. 



Burgomeister Beer recently discovered that video tape could solve its problem 
of creating, producing and trafficking a set of spots in a period of only six days. 

Not until 12 February did it purchase a part of the Winter Olympics to be telecast on 
18 February. A set of four commercials was produced through BBDO, San Francisco, 
on 14 February at CBS Television City in Hollywood. 

Tape copies — and film transfers for stations requiring them — were dropped in the mail 
on 16 February, two days before the air date. 



NTA Telestudio's new Television Audience Research (TAR) service will intro- 
duce a new measurement system, the EQ, or effectiveness quotient, for relative rat- 
ing of brand commercials. 

For the first time, via TAR, advertisers will be able to test commercials in homes under 
normal viewing conditions. 

TAR will measure the rates of "walkaway," interest, memorability, credibility, and respon- 
siveness (likelihood of buying) — this last factor getting very heavy weight in the analysis of 
scores. 

Here are some features of the new commercials testing method: 

• Random sampling of names from telephone directories. 

• Special questions can be posed to answer unusual or particular advertising problems. 

• Selective sampling can be done if the advertiser is specially interested in particular types 
of audiences. 

Cost to test a one-minute spot will be approximately $1,200, including time and 
program material provided on WNTA-TV, New York. 

23 april 1960 61 




PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade I 
trends and tips for at 



SPONSOR HEARS 



23 APRIL I960 Firestone is apparently over its peeve against the networks for what happc 

copyriiht ibm to its institutional pride a few seasons back. 

sponsor The tire maker this week was shopping among the tv networks for a nighttime shoi 



Colgate's about ready to unveil its first two proprietary products for 
Burners. 

One, a stomach remedy, will be acceptable to tv, but the other hasn't a chance ii 
medium. In fact, Bates, after a feeler here and there, has dropped it as a tv item. 



You can count on P&G never to buy into a network show on the basis o^ 
first rating, regardless of how impressive that rating may be. 

Its tendency is to be suspicious about that initial rating and to wait for another rj 
or two before exercising its "judgment." 

William Paley is reported to have assigned to himself the finding of a solul 
for that 10-11 a.m. stretch on CBS TV which hasn't been faring so well. 

One possibility: using the hour for an elaborate educational-information series. 



A leading spot agency this week took a key midwest station to task for c 
pelling it to take — at the same price — a low-rated spot on a local show in orde 
get three Jack Paar spots over four weeks. 

The agency's argument: since the rating of the local participation was a tenth the i 
of the Paar spots the client was getting an inequitable cost-per-thousand on Paarl 
it would be preferable for the station to raise the Paar rate. 



Don't be surprised when you hear that one of the soap colossal s is negotia 
for an old-line cosmetic house. 

What could stymie the deal: uncertainty about unfavorable FTC reaction. 



General Foods is said to have appropriated $12 million for the initial pus! 
its Yuban instant coffee. 

After the New York tv blitz and sampling it's headed for similar treatment in PI 
delphia, Atlanta and St. Louis. 

(For New York Yuban bust-out see 16 April SPONSOR-SCOPE.) 



P&G and General Motors are the towering giants in their respective fields 
the twain won't meet during the coming season. 

GM was offered an alternate sponsorship in the Law and Mr. Jones and the answer 
everything we sponsor in tv is on an exclusive basis. 

The GM spokesman apparently forgot that Chevrolet and United Motors are bu] 
minutes on ABC TV. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL I 



by, KXOA, The number 1 
ion in Sacramento, Cali- 

!a's Capital, booms out with 
imes more power than ever 
e! Now the dynamic KXOA 
ophone brings the right 
ination of programming and 

I.nalities to more people in 
prosperous Sacramento 
y than any other station. 
d first in both Hooper (Dec. 
eb. '60) and Pulse (Sept- 
'59), KXOA reaches the 
n's 20th ranking market 
Jil Sales per Household, 
U) with 5,000 watts... five 
i s the power it took to be 
> )er one. And enough power 
HI more goods and serv- 
e for you and your clients. 

• NAL REPRESENTATIVES: DAREN 
■GAVREN COMPANY, SOUTHERN 
' S: CLARKE BROWN COMPANY. 



VSftftfcM* • • • • • • • A" 

f JL» • • • # • •••••• • •< 






KXOA 

FIRST IN SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA'S CAPITAL 






NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



SPEED DEMONS — Not just emergency 
crew (above), but KOLN-TVs newsmen, who 
rushed to the scene in Army 'copters, trucks, 
motorboats and cars, thereby covering within 
a 100-mile radius, recent Lincoln, Neb., floods 



X-RAY DAY in Harlem, N. Y., launched by 
WLIB with N. Y. Tuberculosis & Health So- 
ciety, Dept. of Health, drew scores to buses, 
including station staffers (l-r) Billy Taylor, 
Hal Jackson, Norma Greenstein, Betty Frank 



ADVERTISERS 



P. Lorillard (L&N) seems to 1 
favoring NBC TV more tin, 
ABC TV in allocating its netwo 
largess for the fall. 

So far Lorillard has committed 
self on NBC for alternate weeks of t.' 
Tab Hunter Show and The Western 
(Sunday, 8:30 and Tuesday 9:30. 
spectively), and is considering 
third show. Westclox will spons : 
the Hunter show on alternate weell 

Rexall l BBDO I has lined itself 
for the fall with an alternate week 
National Velvet, which will prere 
Hunter. 

Bay uk cigars I Wermen& Schnr 
sponsor two-thirds of a bowlii 
series with Milton Berle as m.c. 
NBC this fall. The time: Mondi 
10:30-11 p.m. 

The appointment of Fritz Oj 
linger as ad manager of Him 
Foods and Industries may ha- 
favorable implications for tv. 

Ohlinger was formerly with Bi) 
nett. NL&B. and Fitzgerald, all 




SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 



ich have a strong kinship with tv. 
)n the other hand, the medium 
[n't got much else but lipservice so 

out of Hunt, which, incidentally, 
i controls the McCall Corp. and 
io Match. Wesson Oil is also in 

Hunt empire. 

e Sweets Co. of America is 
ering the ice cream field via 
' national distribution of its 
lv Tootsie Roll Ice Cream Bar. 

'lans call for a heavy advertising 
j,edule with emphasis placed on 
vst-to-coast tv. Local campaigns will 
tfure promotions at the point-of- 

jt is expected that the Tootsie Roll 
U Cream Bar will be on sale in 
j-.ny areas about 15 May. 

i mpaigns : 

Von's and Shopping Bag 

lijrkets, food chain in Southern Cali- 
ijhia, has a new promotion keyed to 
Ikte a strong corporate image. It's 
'eries of "non-price" commercials 
phasizing the company's extra care 
i attention given to its various de- 



partments and services. The campaign 
calls for increased radio spots on 
KMPC, KPOL, and KBIG, incorpor- 
ating a jingle built around this theme. 
Agency: Honig-Cooper & Harrington, 
Los Angeles. 

• Nalleys, Inc., Tacoma, Wash, 
kicks-off new tv schedules this month, 
to run through June, for its chip dips 
and specialty dressings. The campaign 
covers the market areas of Northern 
California, Utah, Idaho, Montana, 
Oregon and Washington. Agency: Pa- 
cific National Advertising. Seattle. 

Special promotion: Texaco (C& 

W) this week launches a consumer 
contest. The idea: motorists are be- 
ing invited, via Texaco's Huntley- 
Brinkley Report (NBC TV) as well 
as spot tv announcements, to write 
their own tv commercials for Fire 
Chief and Sky Chief Su-preme Gaso- 
lines. More than 1,200 prizes will be 
awarded. 

Winners of the Ohio Stations' 
first annual award program com- 
petition : 



Sun Finance & Loan Co. ( Wyse Ad- 
vertising) ; International Old Dutch 
(Marcus Advertising) ; Nickles Bak- 
ing Co. (Griswold-Eshleman) ; Stand- 
ard Oil— Ohio (McCann-Marschalk) ; 
Eckert Packing Co. (Central Adver- 
tising) ; Ohio Bell Telephone Co. 
(McCann-Marschalk) ; and The Ohio 
Farm Bureau (Byer & Bowman Ad- 
vertising). 

Judges: John E. McMillin, ex- 
ecutive editor of sponsor; Robert 
Edens, v.p., Warwick & Legler; and 
Clifford Field, v.p., Ogilvy, Benson 
& Mather. 



Thisa 'n' data: Schlitz Old Mil- 
waukee Bear (Gordon Best) is lin- 
ing up a few tv markets . . . Abbott 
Lab's Sucaryl (Tatham-Laird) is now 
testing in a couple of markets . . . Gen- 
eral Foods Instant Yuban is sup- 
porting its tv introductory campaign 
with what it terms "the most exten- 
sive sampling campaign ever under- 
taken to launch a new coffee" in 
Philadelphia, Atlanta, and St. Louis 
. . . The Campbell Soup Co. has a 
new marketing effort: a premium 



CRYPTIC TRIPTYCH? Maybe, but from locale (ABC TV affiliates 
meeting, (Chic), and people (l-r, George Gribbin, pres., Y&R; Henry 
Kaiser, Oliver Treyz, pres., ABC TV), gab could be about radio/tv 




WHETTING WESTERN APPETITES, femcee Julie Benell swaps Texas- 
style recipes, on WFAA-TV, Dallas, with caterer Walter Jetton against 
specially created art backdrop of famous and infamous Westerners 



T'S WARM OUTSIDE ... on this side of the street, that is, 
' (Phila.) models brave the still-nippy weather to help pro- 
| station's Color Radio campaign to downtown passersby shoppers 

23 april 1960 




offer for silver soup labels in ex- 
change for $] and a label from one of 
its five newest soups. The offer will 
be promoted via Campbell's tv com- 
mer< Lais throughout May. 

Strictly personnel: Theodore 
Rosenak, promoted to executive v.p. 
of Pabsl Brewing Co. . . . John Tay- 
lor. In manager of marketing admini- 
stration, broadcast and tv equipment 
division. RCA . . . James Whalen, 
t<> retail sales manager of the Jacob 
Ruppert Brewery. 



AGENCIES 



Compton president Bart Cum- 
mings urged the advertising in- 
dustry to "take off our saekcloth 
and take the offensive" in a talk 
last week before Chicago's Agate 
Club. 

Cummings' stand: "Let's stop look- 
ing at our business with a microscope 
and. instead, use field glasses in scan- 
ning the American horizon." 

Advertising men. he noted, should 
stop applauding critics of advertis- 
ing and start to call attention to the 



Ray Ellingsen 



HOTOGRAPHY 



can give 

photographic needs 

the kind of 

attention 

you like 

. . . backed by 

experience 

and artistry! 

Simply call 
DEIaware 7-7249 

or wrile to 

12 E. Grand Ay 9. 

Chicago 



fact that it occupies an intregal part 
of this American economy, and that 
it makes mass production possible be- 
cause it gets people to agree on a 
product, thus bringing down prices 
for the consumer. 

Agency appointments: Columbia 
Phonographs, CBS Electronics, a di- 
vision of CBS, billing $500,000, from 
McCann-Erickson, to Donahue & 
Coe . . . Citation, a new line of men's 
toiletries to be introduced this Fall 
by Mennen. to Warwick & Legler 
. . . The Oil Heat Council of greater 
Chicago, to D'Arcy . . . The Greater 
Miami Rambler Dealers Association, 
to Geyer, Morey, Madden & Bal- 
lard . . . Helene Curtis Industries' 
beauty salon division, to Altman- 
Stoller, New York . . . Brooks Foods, 
Inc., Collinsville, 111., to S. E. Zu- 
brow Co., Philadelphia . . . WLS, 
Chicago, to Reach, MeClinton & 
Co. 

New quarters : The Hollvwood office 
of N. W. Aver & Son. to the Taft 
Building. Hollvwood & Vine. Edmund 
Rogers, Jr.. v.p., is in charge. 

New officers of Campbell-Mithun, 

Minneapolis: Rav Mithun, to chair- 
man of the board of directors: Albert 
R. Whitman, elected president; and 
Norman Best, to executive v.p. 

They were elected v.p.'s: Lang- 
don Wesley, at Geyer, Morey, Mad- 
den & Ballard . . . Kerry Sheeran 
and C. James Fleming, Jr., at Ted 
Bates . . . Giancarlo Rossini, at 
Gardner . . . John Anderson, 



In New York City 

has MORE 
Negro programming 

than ALL other 
stations combined 



Henry Muller, and John Soul 
ard, jr., at B&B . . . Henry 1 
stead, at D-F-S, Chicago . . . Nei 
M it/man. at Ogilvy, Benson \ Mat 
er . . . Clifford McCall, Jr., at I 
bert Frank-Guenther Law ... Bo 
Reichenbaeh, at Bernard B. Schni 
zer, San Francisco . . . Philip Dor 
at Brown & Rowland. New York . . 
Carolyn Churchman, at Ruben S 
vertising, Indianapolis . . . Herschd 
Goodman, at Stern, Walters & Sii 
mons, Chicago. 

Other admen on the move : Fn 
Morr, elected executive v.p. of ( 
don Best Co., Chicago . . . Farul 
Jenkins, Neal Gilliatt, and Geoq 
Park, promoted to senior v.p.'s , 
McCann-Erickson Advertising i U. 
A.) ... Richard Stevens, to seni 
v.p. in charge of administration 
Fletcher Richards. Calkins & Hold 
. . . Lawrence Williams, to direct 
of radio and tv at Zimmer. Kell< 
Calvert. Detroit . . . Ransom 1 
nell, to director of radio and tv H 
Potts-Woodbury, Kansas City. 




CBS emerged as the biggest > 
ner in the George Foster Pe 
body Radio & Tv Awards pr 
sented by the RTES in New Yo 
this week. 

Here are the award categories, a 
the winners: 

Tv News: Khrushchev A\ 
ABC. 

Tv Entertainment I non musi< al 
The Play of The Week, WNTA-j 
Newark, N. J., and David SusskL 
for The Moon and Sixpence. .\B 
and Great Music from Chicago, V> G 
TV. Chicago. 

Tv Education: The Population E 
plosion, CBS, and Decisions, WGB1 
TV, Boston. 

Tv Contribution to Internatiou 
Understanding: The Ed Sulliv 
Show, CBS, and Small World. (1 

Local Tv Public Service: WHS] 
TV, New Orleans. 

Tv Special Awards: Dr. Yram 
Stanton. CBS. and The Lost Cla<s j 
'59, CBS. 

Radio news: The World TonigM 
CBS. 

Radio Public Service: Famih £ij 
ing, '59, NBC. 

Local Radio Public Service : WCfl 
Minneapolis. 



23 APRIL 19ft 






E PLURIBUS UNUM SQUARED 

Suppose each of the thirteen original colonies sent an equal 
number of men to fight the Redcoats. Suppose they fought 
in solid phalanxes of perfect squares (that is, the men from 
each colony formed a square of n men on a side, so that the 
total number of men present was 13« 2 ). Suppose George 
Washington, the great unifier, decided to add himself to 
the total and rearrange the works, himself included, into 
one big solid, perfect square. 

1. What's the smallest number of men each colony 
would have had to send to make the unification possible? 
(No fractions permitted. G.W. required whole men.) 

2. What has this to do with Washington, D. C. time- 
buying? 

(We'll send you the answer to the first question upon re- 
quest. Or, if you send us the correct solution, we'll send you 
a copy of Dudeney's "Amusements in Mathematics," pub- 
lished by Dover Publications, Inc., N. Y.) 

(We never could figure out the answer to the second 



question.) 



wmal-tv 

Channel 7 Washington, O. C. 
An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 



A1 ; iated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D. C; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 



SliVSOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



67 



The NAB this week mailed two 

new jin-l. - to the more than 
2,100 radio members for use on 
the air beginning May — National 
Radio Month. 

The jingles, created by Faillace 
Productions. Inc.. promote radio sta- 
tions and the medium. 

NAB's manager of government 
relations. Vineent Wasilewski, 

told the House Communications and 
Power Subcommittee that the Asso- 
ciation is opposed to giving the 
FCC power to suspend station 
lieenses. 

Regarding "payola," Wasilewski 
said this about NAB position: the 
problem might be best remedied 
through enactment of commercial 
bribery legislation rather than 
through amendment to Section 317. 

Mark The Calendar: 

4 May : SRA Advertising Awards 

luncheon, Waldorf-Astoria, New York, 
and Ambassador East Hotel, Chicago. 
5-6 May: Montana Broadcasters 
Association's annual meeting, Fin- 
len Hotel, Butte. 
6 May: Radio & Tv Guild con- 



ferences and banquet, San Francisco 
State College. 

5-8 May: AWRT national conven- 
tion, Pick-Carter Hotel, Cleveland. 
10 May: Wisconsin Fm Station 
Clinic, University of Wisconsin, 
Madison. 

12-15 May: AFA Fourth District 
convention, Beach Club Hotel, Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fla. 

13-15 May: South Dakota Broad- 
casters Association meeting, Shera- 
ton-Johnson Hotel, Rapid City. 
14-16 May: AFA Second District 
convention. Skvline Inn, Mt. Pocono. 
Pa. 

18-20 May: Electronic Industries 
Association convention, Pick Con- 
gress Hotel, Chicago. 
18-21 May: Pennsylvania Asso- 
ciation of Broadcasters, Galen 
Hall, Reading. 

21-22 May: Illinois News Broad- 
casters Association spring meeting, 
University of Illinois, Urbana. 
26-31 May: National Federation 
of Advertising Agencies manage- 
ment conference, Northernaire Hotel, 
Three Lakes, Wis. 
27-28 May: University of Ken- 
tucky Alumni Association seminar. 




(embracing industrial, progrc 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1320,100 Drug Sales 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales 

Food Sales $ 300,486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 75.9% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to November 1959 ARB we average 75.9% share of audience from 
Sign On to Sign Off 7 days a week. 

CBS • A B C 

i James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 

r coverage 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 



Subject: Communications, 19f 
Speakers: John E. McMillin, exen 
tive editor SPONSOR, Don Whitened! 
John Day, Jr., v.p., CBS News; G 
bert Kingsbury, v.p. for p.r. at Cn 
ley Broadcasting; Burton Milwar 
William Small: William Arthur; a 
Bill Ladd. Lexington. Ky. 

They were elected: 

Officers of the 4-A's ChicJ 
Council : chairmen, Alex Franz, 
the firm bearing his name: vice chat| 
man. Robert Brinkerhoff. Y&R; a 
secretary-treasurer. William Edward 
D'Arcy. 

Officers of the Association I 
Maximum Service Telecasted! 
president. Jack Harris; 1st m 
Charles Crutchfield; 2nd v.p.. Doiri 
Davis; and secretary-treasurer, H. 
old Essex. 



The improved position of a nu 
ber of syndicators in terms ! 
business volume became clear 
quarterly reports which surve* 
the first three months of I960) 
ABC Films, for example. report 
these increases in volume: 

• Domestic sales, up 176$ o' 

1959. including Canadian sales. 

• Foreign sales, up 238 r "r o 

1960. counting all other areas. 

Sales: High Adventure sold in ( 
many. Japan and Australia throi 
N. R. B. Associates . . . Econon 
Division of Ziv-UA reports I 
Science Fiction Theater and Mr. 
trict Attorney are now in 152 and 
markets, respectivelv . . . Ofn< 
Films' Almanac sold to WGN' 
Chicago: WOW-TV. Omaha: KT1 
TV. El Paso: KOB-TV, Albuquei 
and WAFB-TV. Baton Rouge . 
Banner Films' Speedway Inte 
tional to WGN-TV. Chicago: KX 
Sacramento: KSHO-TV, Las V 
Skvwav Advertisers. Denver: ^ 
TV. Indianapolis; KBAK-TV. Ball 
field; WNEW-TV. New York: WXj 
TV, Milwaukee; WTVH. P. 
WTTG. Washington; WAV 
Portsmouth: KELP-TV, El Pas. 
WHNY-TV. Springfield. 

Trade note: S. O. S. Cinema Si 

ply announces a new LectronoUh 
lay timer. 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL l! 



d$£4n* 




King Henry V made things happen at Agincourt ...and 




WPEN 

RADIO 
MAKES 
THINGS 
HAPPEN 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 

IN awards four college scholarships 
year to students throughout the Phila- 
ia area, selected in cooperation with 
N, by the Mayor and Superintendents 
b Public and Parochial School Sys- 
Education is our responsibility — a 
Iso good business. In Public 
es .. And In Exciting Listens ^N 

ts Things Happen In Phi <:!phia. 

WF>r Al 

presented nationally b. . i-L-PERNA 

iw York • San Francisco • Los Angeles 
licago • Boston • Detroit • Atlanta 

CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATION 




content per ^^ 

100 homes _{*..' 

latest Pulse I 




k nd. in the market 
latest Pulse 

WJB0 50 K7 S 

^ in BATON ROUGE 

represented by 
HOLLINGBERRY 



Industrial Crescent 




^^ A Vast 

Urban Complex 



WORK, EARN 
and SPEND. 

and it's dominated by 

ujfmy-tv 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Represented by New York • Chicago 

Harrington, Righter • San Francisco • Atlanta 

& Parsons, Inc. Boston » Detroit 



Commercials: Music Makers to oc- 
cupj expanded quarters at 6/8 West 
57th Street, New York, on 1 July. The 
new facilities will include an ad- 
vanced sound studio. The building 
will be renamed as '"The Music Mak- 
ers Building." . . . Cleo Hovel has 
joined Leo Burnett in Chicago as 
v.p. and assistant to the head of the 
tv commercial department . . . Ste- 
phen Muffatti to commercials di- 
rector of Terrytoons and Eli Bauer 
named Terrytoons story and layout 
chief . . . Rex Benson appointed 
account executive and Jaek T. Vinis 
to sales and production staff of 
United Film and Recording Studios, 
Chicago . . . Lionel F. Grower 
named v.p. in charge of the Hollv- 
wood division of Fred Niles Produc- 
tions . . . John T. Westerlund and 
Arnold Wilkes become executive 
producers of Milner-Fenwick of Balti- 
more and Washington. 



NETWORKS 



Those General Muls Rev. Bob 
Richards five-minute transcrip- 
tions which Knox-Reeves has 
been talking to station about has 
found a home at CBS Radio. 

They "11 be aired at the rate of two 
a week for 13 weeks, starting 2 May. 

Another CBS Radio sale the past 
week: 7-Up iJWT Chicago). 15 five- 
minute shows with the Kingston Trio 
for 13 weeks, beginning mid-June. 

Mutual Broadcasting System has 
been sold again — this time to 
Minnesota Mining & Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

Robert F. Hurleigh will continue as 
president of the radio network. 

Terms of the purchase were not 
disclosed. 

Network tv sales and renewals: 
Chevrolet l Campbell-Ewald ) has re- 
newed for the Dinah Shore Chevy 
Show on NBC TV next season. The 
series will continue its current Sun- 
day. 9-10 p.m. period . . . The Cali- 
fornia Packing Corp. I McCann- 
Erickson). for thirds of Laramie and 
Riverboat on NBC TV, to start in 
May and run through the Summer 
. . . Positan Corp. I KHCC&A i . for 
participations on Dick Clark's Ameri- 
can Bandstand, ABC TV . . . The 
Bell System I Aver I for alternate 
weeks with the Bell Telephone Hour 
on NBC TV next season on alternate 



Fridays from 9-10 p.m. . . . The LI 
gines-Wittnauer Watch Co. sj 

soring three full hour World Wide\ 
programs, this month and next.F 
NBC TV. 

Network personnel notes: Knit. 
R. Pauley, eastern sales manaj 
has been appointed v.p. in char;. 
the ABC Radio network i See Ne\ 
maker of the Week, page 6 1 
Arthur Fox, to the CBS TV Net*| 
affiliate relations department. 

Harold B. Day, ABC TV v.p. 
charge of daytime, veteran in both 
media and one of the most resped 
and liked salesman on Madison Al 
nue, died of a heart attack in 
office last week at the age of 52. 



RADIO STATIONS 



A survey to evaluate and det^ 
mine the impact of radio on I 
independent food and drug 
tailers of Greater New \o 
sponsored by WPAT, Patersd 
during the summer of '59 < ai 
up with these findings: 

• 77 /f of all druggists and ' 
of all grocers have radios 
stores. 

• 82% of all druggists and 6^ 
of all grocers have car radio 

• 99' c of all druggists and 9^ 
of all grocers have radios 
homes. 

• 43$ of all druggists and 33 
of all grocers own and use portal 
radios. 

• Three out of four druggi 
and grocers use in-store rat 
for their own listening pleas 
and are exposed to radio ad 
tising. 

• 85 % of all druggists and i 
of all grocers rate music as their £ 
preference in radio programing 
in-store, in-home, in-car and leis 
listening. 



th 



ih 



Another key station switches t< 
good music policy: Storer's ^ J 
Cleveland, after several years of I 
turing a news and music persona 
format, changes its programing 
May. Station will continue to c 
the NBC news on the hour and ot 
regular NBC network features. 

Ideas at work: 

• Win a 'dream house' : KT1 



• 23 APRIL 1? 



Mm 



THE 17IS ANNUAL 
EWS PICTURES OF THE YEAR COMPETITION 

IN RECOGNITION OF 
ING 'CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIELD OF PHOTOJOURNALISM 
ACCLAIMS 

KFMB-TV, SAN DIEGO 
VEWSFILM STATION OF THE YEAR 
19 5 9 

THE NATIONAL PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 

ENCYCLOPAEDIA 'BRITANNIC*' 



KFMBjpTV 
SAN DIEGO 



( EdwardlPetry *Yco., Inc.) 



A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 



CHANNEL 8 



1 



^ 



FROM 

1949 

RIGHT TO 

THIS MOMENT, 

KFMB-TV 

NEWS IS 

STILL FIRST 

IN RATINGS 

AND 

IMPORTANCE 





THE PLACE TO BE IS 

KGLO-TV 

• FIRST IN COVERAGE 1 " 

• TOPS IN PROGRAMMING AND 
RATINGS 1 " 

CBS (Of course) 

• LOWEST COST PER 
THOUSAND' 

•NCS #3 "Pulse FORW 

KCLO-TV 

MASON CITY, IOWA " 

See Branham Co. National Reps. 




While serving a single 
station market, WTHI-TV 
fulfills its public service re- 
sponsibilities in a way that 
has gained for it the appre- 
ciation and support of its 
entire viewing area ... a cir- 
cumstance that must be re- 
flected in audience response 
to advertising carried. 

Five full y 2 hours of local 
public service program- 
ming each week. 



CHANNEL 10 CBS • ABC 

TERRE HAUTE 



Austin, next week wraps-up its two- 
months long "Dream House" contest. 
The idea: Listeners, via a heavy 
schedule of on-the-air promotions, are 
asked to write a 10-word slogan pro- 
moting Civil Defense and to identify 
a "mystery scene" from photographs 
displayed at the site of the dream 
house. Winner receives this fully- 
equipped home. 

• Promoting good landscape: 
Last week culminated a civic project 
initiated and supported by KCBS, 
San Francisco, dubbed "Plant A Tree 
Week." During this week some 6.000 
trees were planted in 28 different 
cities throughout the Bav Area. 
Awarded for the best landscaping was 
Sunnyvale. 

• Spring snowmen : Heavy snow- 
fall in Cincinnati during late March 
prompted W'CKY to come up with 
this quickie promotion: station of- 
fered awards for photographs of 
snow T men bearing the WCKY call let- 
ters. 

Thisa 'n' data: Quality Radio 
Group member stations will hold a 
June programing, promotion and 
public relations clinic . . . WLIB. 
New York, has aired more than 200 
special radio newscasts and features 
on aspects of the Civil Rights bill 
since 24 February . . . KDKA, Pitts- 
burgh, last week staged, in coopera- 
tion with the Easter Seal Society, a 
"Big K Easter Egg Scramble" for 
children from six to 12 vears of age. 

Station staffers: Mark Evans, 

named v. p. of public affairs for Met- 
ropolitan Broadcasting Corp. . . . Al 
Boyd, to national sales manager, and 
Armand Belli, sales manager. WLS. 
Chicago . . . Inez Aimee, to research 
and sales promotion director for 
\\ INS. New York . . . Randell Clay. 
to sales manager for WOAI, San An- 
tonio . . . Five new v.p.'s elected at 
Storer: Terry Lee, WAGA-TV, At- 
lanta: Reginald Martin, WSPD. 
Toledo: Ben Wickham, WJW-TV. 
Cleveland: Bernard Neary, WGBS. 
Miami: and Maurice McMurray. 
national sales director headquartered 
in New York. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



FTC chairman Earl Kintner will 
be keynote speaker at the SRA 
1960 Advertising Awards lunch- 



eon a week from Wednesdav 

May). 

The honors: the "Silver Nail"' til 
buyer of the year award, the "Gi 
Ke\" award, and. for the first til 
the "Chicago" timebuyer of the 
award. 

The presentations will be made 
New York at the Waldorf- Astorii a 
simultaneouslv in Chicago at the X 
bassador East Hotel. 

NBC Spot Sales this week i — li 
the results of its Timebuy 
Opinion Panel on "State 
lie Service Programing." 

The highlights: 

• Seventy-two percent of th? pa 
would recommend the purchase <jj 
public service show if thev were a 
plied more qualitative inforn 
tion. 

• Sixty-five percent feel that 
station having a strong public s 
ice image provides greater bJ 
effectiveness for advertisers. 

• Ninety-five percent agreed ■ 
public service is effective in mo 
ing a corporate image. 

• The top three types of puj 
service programing that panelists 
lieve have the greatest audience 
peal during evening time are ne 
significance, documentary, i 
local problems. 

Seventeen sales representatW 

from national radio and tv firms aj 
local stations participated in 1 
D'Arcy "Media Relations Se* 
nar" in St. Louis last week. 

The program was the 11th in a c 
tinuing series of meetings betwi 
agency personnel and media peo 
instituted two years ago to introd 
D'Arcy to the reps on a perso 
basis. 

Among the participators: A. 
Knippenberg and Tom Taylor. PG 
Fred Edwards, Weed & Co.; I 
Simpson, Adam Young: Fred 
man. Paul H. Raymer; Tom Hetl 
ington, Katz: Arthur Kelley. rl 
and Eugene Grav, Boiling Co. 

Rep appointments: KWKY, 
Moines, to Broadcast Time Sa 
. . . KXII-TV. Ardmore, Okla.-Sl 
man-Denison. Tex., to Venard, R 
toul & McConnell . . . WABY. 
banv; WRIP. Chattanooga; « 
WDMV, Pocomoke City, Md.. tc I 
Walton Associates . . . WrJ 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 




Help forge the only link with freedom 

that 76 million satellite captives have— 

support Radio Free Europe 



Leaders of the broadcasting industry — men 
like Goldenson, McGannon, Sarnoff and 
Stanton — are today urging you to help tell the 
truth to the audience that needs it most. Use 
your programs, your voice to back up your 
Radio Free Europe colleagues. Seldom has 
American broadcasting had such an opportu- 
nity to help sustain/ree broadcasting through- 
out the world. Your RFE kit contains all the 
radio and television materials you need to do 
a complete job. 

What Radio Free Europe is 

RFE is a privately supported network of 28 
transmitter and relay stations broadcasting to 



76 million captive peoples in Poland, Hungary, 
Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Romania. It is 
on the air up to 18 hours a day reaching this 
vital, truth-hungry audience. 

Why RFE is important 

Without broadcasts like those of RFE, the cap- 
tive peoples of satellite countries would never 
know the truth about the outside world. It 
gives moral sustenance to those nations which 
have traditionally loved freedom. During the 
Special Campaign period, April 24 — May 8, 
please give Radio Free Europe your all-out 
personal support. 



Broadcasters for Radio Free Europe 



*SOR • 23 APRIL 1960 



YOU 
KCAN'T 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 

KCEN-TV 




5 & 10! 



our plans for top rated 
spots in class B, C and D 
time deliver viewers at 
lowest cost per thousand. 

IIS i 

CHANNEL ^ gy 



Keene, N. H., and WKNY, Kingston, 
N. Y., to Walker-Rawalt Co. as 

their New England rep. 

New offices: Hal Walton Associ- 
ates, New York, opened a Midwest 
sales office at 333 North Michigan 
Avenue, Chicago. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 
Richard Levy, to tv account execu- 
tive in the New York office of Ed- 
ward Petry & Co. . . . Gideon Gil- 
liam, to the Atlanta radio sales staff, 
and John Sherwin, to the New York 
tv sales staff of the Katz Agency . . . 
John Rohrbach, Jr., to account ex- 
ecutive in the NBC TV Spot Sales, 
Central Division . . . Roger Cho- 
quet, to sales and sales promotion at 
Foster & Creed, New England region- 
al rep. 



TV STATIONS 



The tobacco industry in 1959 
had record gross time billings on 
national and regional spot and 
network tv of $106,659,190, 
compared with $93,443,822 
soent in 1958 reports TvB-BAR- 
LNA. 

Cigaret advertising spot and net- 
work tv gross time billings totalled 
$96,356,529, compared with $89,248,- 
461 in 1958. Cigars and pipe tobac- 
co gross time billings on spot and 
network tv in '59 were $9,635,647 as 
against $3,413,776 in 1958. 

Here are the gross time billings of 
the top 10 cigaret brands on tv 
during 1959, according to TvB: 

BRAND SPOT NETWORK 

1. Kent $2,859,230 $7,331,735 

2. Viceroy 3,125,610 5,236,084 

3. Winston 1,096,860 6,195,042 

4. Salem 2,266,130 4,633,990 

5. L&M 1,474,890 5,093,975 

6. Camel 809,000 5,275,128 

7. Pall Mall 1,020,600 4,098,601 

8. Parliament 2,285,540 2,705,102 

9. Chesterfield 392,380 3,968,516 
10. Tareyton 1,676,670 2,091.869 

More industry expenditures on 
tv during 1959, as reported by 
TvB: 

• The nation's brewers used tv at 
a record pace as their number one 
advertising medium last year. Na- 
tional spot tv advertising gross time 
billings were $42,945,000, against 
$ 10.299.000 in '58. Network gross 



time billings for beer and ale adv(j 
tising in '59 were $6,021,026 
pared with $5,873,656 in 1958. II 
10 leading brewery tv spenders in "51 
in order: Anheuser-Busch, Falsur 
Schlitz, Carling, Pabst, Hamm, Rl 
pert, National, Piel Bros., and I!, 
lantine. 

• The toy industry also turne< 
tv at a record pace. Network , 
spot tv gross time billings last v 
were $6,206,764 — an increase 
77% over 1958's $3,497,873. The 
leading toy and game spenders in t 
Mattel, Remco, Louis Marx, Co|| 
forms, Ideal, Emenee Indi 
American Character Doll. Hassenl] 
Bros., Selchow & Righter, and 
old Habn. 

TIO chairman Louis Hausma 

at the NAB convention, introduce 
a monthly bulletin listing of 
standing contributions in infa 
mation, education and the arts 
presented over Chicago's ffl 
commercial tv stations. 

The stations cooperating in the b 
letin's publication: WBKB. WBI 
TV, WNBQ. and WGN-TV. 

A similar service is being 
taken by Los Angeles' seven tv 
tions. 

On the personnel front: Edw 
Pfeiffer, to sales manager of WG| I 
TV, Buffalo . . . Clay Forker, to B 
tional sales manager of WFGA-TJ | 
Jacksonville . . . Gideon Klein, 
sales manager of KWWL-TV, Waj 
loo, Iowa . . . George Andrick, 
local sales manager of WSAZ-1 
Huntington, W. Va. . . . Lew G( 
penter, to the advertising depa 
ment of WLUK-TV, Green Bay . 
Don Pierce, to account executive 
WSPA-TV, Spartanburg . . . Jam 
Gustafson, to local sales manag 
and George Oliviere, to account e 
ecutive at WTTG-TV, Washingto 
D. C. . . . Eugene McCurdy, to < 
rector of local sales for WBAL-T 
Baltimore . . . Hugh Wallace, 
national sales account executive i 
WNAC-TV, Boston . . . Carl Bur 
land, to general manager of TIO . 
Mary Herrick, to sales promoti* 
director of WTOP-TV, Washingto 
D. C. . . . Ted Rosenberg, to dire 
tor of sales for The Leonard F. Fe 
man Co. . . . Earl Hickerson, 
operations director of KOCO-TV. 
lahoma City. 



23 APRIL 1961 




/ ertisers who know the value of a big "viewers per 
|i|ie" figure can make book on this — nowhere in the 
Cplinas will you find family fare to equal that of 
Crlotte's WSOC-TV. The pick of NBC and ABC, plus 
hHated syndicates and top film libraries, is rapidly 
d aging the viewing habits of America's 25th largest 
t»!iarket. Buy WSOC-TV, the big area station. 



WStC-TV 



CHARLOTTE 9 -NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



WSOC and WSOC-TV are associated with WSB and WSB-TV, Atlanta; WHIO and WHIO-TV, Dayton 

H 

»|\SOR • 23 APRIL 1960 

1 1 



$ 100 

WEEKLY 
BUDGET? 



Q 



On WJAR, you'll get 147,777 
home impressions on a 6 to 9 
a.m. schedule, 158,730 on a 
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. schedule, or 
1 64,1 90 on a 4 to 7 p.m. sched- 
ule, with a higher proportion 
of adult buyers, and the lowest 
cost per thousand impressions 
on any Providence station.* 



$ 200 

WEEKLY 
BUDGET? 



Q 



On WJAR, you'll get 394,072 
home impressions on a 6 a.m. 
to 9 a.m. schedule, 423,280 on 
a 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. schedule, or 
437,840 on a 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. 
schedule. WANT RESULTS? BUY 
ADULTS at the lowest cost per 
thousand in the market.* 



"QUALITY IS 
WELCOME EVERYWHERE" 




Sister station of WJAR - TV 

Represented by 

[EdwardYpetry aYco., Inc.] 

The Original Station Representative 



FEDERATED NAB 

i Co it tiit ue d from page 55) 

volume of the associations themselves. 

Some questions have been raised 
as to where i if anywhere) such or- 
ganizations as TvB, TIO, RAB. 
AMST. and others fit into the Fed- 
eration plan. 

Nothing in the sponsor proposal 
envisions any change in the current 
structure, and relationships, of these 
groups. The establishment of sepa- 
rate associations, however, would 
provide a spearhead for all activities 
concerning a particular type of 
broadcasting, and should work for 
greater co-ordination of this work. 

11 years ago. sponsor said, "The 
NAB has outlived its usefulness as a 
giant grab bag. Broadcasting needs 
an overall spokesman. It also needs 
aggressive groups that will fight for 
television, for AM radio, for FM ra- 
dio, and for every other form of 
electronic entertainment the future 
may uncover. Only a Federated NAB 
can do this job." 

sponsor urges industry considera- 
tion of these principles today. ^ 



HIGBEE'S 

[Continued from page 49) 

performance will turn out to be. 

The music and comment is worked 
into a standard format developed by 
Harris, comprising 10 minutes of 
music, followed immediately by a 
minute and a half commercial. The 
pitch stresses the store and station 
phone numbers, where orders mav 
be placed. The tone is intense, with 
a "buy now" theme. The pitch 
gives way to the comment, which in 
turn leads into the music and so the 
cycle runs for three hours. 

Client reaction was summed up by 
a Higbees music department spokes- 
man, saying, "We're delighted! In 
addition to those who call in and 
order the evening of the show, we 
always receive an added 10% more 
business in the next few days. And 
amazingly enough, there are very 
few cancellations of any of these 
orders." 

At the moment, the spectacular 
schedule has been set back to one-a- 
week because of the baseball season 
and problems in clearing time. How- 
ever, they'll be back up at two in 
September, as night radio continues 
to hit the jackpot for Higbee's. ^ 



ick 



w 



SPONSOR ASKS 

I Continued from page 53) 

toy retailing for less than a dollar. 

The toy. "Slap-Stik" ( a revoli 
hoop-like gadget attached to a sticl 
was secured by the WKTV promotiflj 
department from the Keen-Eye Con, 
pany of Butler. Wis. This marked 
toy's debut in this area. Youngsl 
in the Playworld kiddie show 
ing audience were given a brief (li 
than 60 seconds i demonstration 
the mobile toy. Thev were then 
vited to enter their name in a drai 
ing during which a dozen youngst 
would each win a coveted toy. 

The gimmick here, of course 
that to compete in the drawing, 
dren had to deposit their names in' 
receptacle in the sponsor store. Ni[ 
urally, the sponsor anticipated (w 
tongue in cheek I a certain amount 
increased traffic as a result. He 
totally unprepared, however, for tl 
surge of traffic. Youngsters of 
ages experienced a mass attraction Hi 
the little toy ! 

They came, all sizes, all shape 
and from miles around. everywh< 
in the Mohawk Valley! They ca 
to drop their childishly scrawk 
names into the "Slap-Stik" drawn 
box — and with their reluctant paren 
in tow. Parents who had been ac< 
tomed to shopping elsewhere, foi 
themselves, all of a sudden, exami 
ing. and purchasing, the Playwol 
wares. 

Hundreds of new customers w« 
acquired by Playworld during 
"Slap - Stik" draw ing promoti 
staged over a four-week highly coi 
petitive shopping season. Perso 
who admittedly had never set f< 
inside Playworld were forcefu 
guided into the store by their you 
ones. 

The end result was a sizable sa 
increase of toys available at comp 
able prices in many retail top she 
in the area. The Playworld man a) 
ment, whose elevated eyebrows ha 
not vet returned to their normal po 
tion, is convinced that tv advertisi 
is, after all, the most potent. 

To us. here at WKTV. it poinl 
out that all it takes to direct an i 
usual amount of traffic into a st* 
devoid of unique items, is looki 
about for a little gadget small in 
but large in attraction. Then 
potential is only limited by 
imagination to set sales soaring 
win new friends for tv. 



SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 91 



fatterpot 



■ HI 1W1 ■#WI You rake in much 
more audience when you put your sales message on 
KELO-tv SIOUX FALLS and its booster hookups. 



*>,, 







~i> 





m ited from Nov. ARB 6 
1' n.m. 7 days a week. Sur- 
Wliow that KELO-LAND 
|0' the same general rate 
Priority all hours. 




KELO-LAND tv gives you . • • 

48.6% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Omaha station 

49.2% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Des Moines station 

46.8% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Duluth station 

84.3% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Sioux City station 

96.0% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Fargo station 

And KELO-LAND'S husky audience outdelivers TWO of the four Minneapolis-St. Paul 
stations, by 204.5% and 10.5% respectively. YOUR BET, MR. ADVERTISER! 



KEL0LANP 




KELO-7V 

SIOUX FALLS; and booste 



General Offices: Sioux Falls, S.D. 

JOE FLOYD, President • Evans Nord, General Manager 



Larry Bentson, Vice-Prri. 




OKLAHOMA CITY 

BEN WEST, GEN. MGR. 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKER] 






^ Carl Lindemann, Jr., has been named v.j 

JpP^I^ of program sales. NBC TV. Previously 

of daytime programs, he joined the netwoj 
in April, 1948, rose to associate product 
of The Kate Smith Hour in 1953. and 
year later, was named senior unit manage 
of the Home show. He has also held 
post of business manager of the NBC 
program department. A native of Ne 
Jersey, Lindemann and his family currently live in Old Greenv\ 
Conn. He is a graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technol 



Id 




Larry Saunders, account executive at 
WTAR, Norfolk, has been presented with 
the 1960 Distinguished Salesman Award by 
the Norfolk-Portsmouth Sales Executive 
Club. Saunders began his radio career at 
age 15 as announcer at various Tidewater 
stations. He joined WTAR in the same ca- 
pacity in 1955, became news editor in 1957, 
and joined the sales staff in '59. Saunders 
was graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1957, a 
received the Va. Associated Press Award for special events in 19 

Felix Jackson has been appointed v.p. 
NBC TV programs. West Coast. Bef< 
joining the network last month, he was 
Y&R and CBS TV where he produ< 
Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Four Star Ph 
house and Studio One. At Y&R, he sup 
vised all dramatic tv programs sponsni 
by the agency's clients. As a writer, Jai 
son was associated with Robert Mont^o 
ery Presents, Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, and other programs. Born a 
educated in Europe, he now lives with his family in Sherman 0a 

Clay E. Forker has been appointed nation- 
al sales manager of WFGA-TV, Jackson- 
ville, Fla. Before joining Channel 12, he 
was v.p. and office manager of Paul H. Ray- 
mer Co., Chicago representatives. Previ- 
ously, Forker was account executive for the 
Dupont Divisions at BBDO and account 
executive for Chevrolet at Campbell-Ewald. 
Also promoted: William Walker, to assist- 
ant national sales manager. He joined WFGA-TV three years a 
and has served as promotion manager and regional sales maaaj 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL 1! 





A BRIEF 



HISTOIRE DAIR FRANCE 

(that is also a history of French aviation) 



^'HISTOIRE ANCIENNE LHISTOIRE MODERNE 



FIRST MEN TO FLY. 
Joseph and Etienne 
Montgolfier successfully 
take to the skies, June 5, 
1783. Man's ancient 
dream of air-borne travel 
suddenly becomes a prac- 
tical reality. 




'HISTOIRE "PIONEER 



FIRST ENGINE- 
POWERED DIRIGI- 
BLE. Remarkable 
speed of 6 Vfe MPH was 
clocked by Henri Gil- 
ford on a Paris-Trappe 
flight, September 24, 
1852. An early demon- 
stration of the French 
genius for technical 
achievement that is a 
tradition with Air 
France today. 





FIRST INTERNA- 
TIONAL PASSENGER 
FLIGHT. Air France's 
flight from Paris to 
London, February 8, 
1919. Eleven passen- 
gers made the trip. 
[Flew 187 miles in 2 x 'i 
jhours. Today, Air 
[France passengers fly 
il 500 miles in the same 
2Vz hours. 



FIRST INTERNA- 
TIONAL FLIGHT. 
French aviation gained 
new stature when Louis 
Bleriot flew 25 miles 
across the English Chan- 
nel, July 25, 1909. This 
memorable journey fo- 
cused world attention 
on the immense possi- 
bilities of commercial 
flight. 





LES PLUS GRANDES ROUTES. Today, Air France 
the world's largest airline. Routes cover more than 
202,000 unduplicated miles. ..connect 210 cities in 
76 countries. Air France is the largest French air- 
line, too. Though it cooperates closely with all other 
French airlines, none are part of Air France. As the 
official French national airline, Air France main- 
tains its unique identity... the oldest, the largest, 
the most experienced of all. 



LES PLUS GRANDS JETS. 
All Air France jets are superb! 
The 707 Intercontinental are 
the largest, fastest, longest- 
range jets in the world. Air 
France Caravelle Jets have an 
outstanding performance rec- 
ord. Air France uses both to 
provide the world's only jet- 
to-jet service between the 
U.S.A., Europe, Africa and the 
Middle East. 





LE PLUS GRAND SERVICE. Air France service 
is incredibly lavish, incomparably French. On ever 
flight, passengers enjoy superb French cuisine, 
quisite French service at no extra cost. Experk 
Air France pilots are experts at providing 
restful flights. They have flown more than 5000.000 
pure jet passenger miles. 



S NSOR 



• 23 april 1960 



■sponsor 

■IsPEAKS 



Needed: a better NAB market place 

Broadcasters come to an NAB Convention to (1) attend 
meetings, (2) visit with friends and exchange points of view, 
(3) check up on new developments and products with an eye 
to doing some buying, and (4) have some fun. 

The 1960 Convention wasn't much fun. Nor was the 
agenda anything to shout about. But what caused special 
distress and frustration was the fact that anyone trying to 
visit the scores of commercial firms quartered in the Conrad 
Hilton was in for a hard time. The broadcasters didn't like 
it. The services were unhappy. 

Aside from the heavy equipment, like RCA, Ampex, Gates, 
Collins, and GE, the marketplace was missing. And, in our 
opinion, an easy-to-find and easy-to-look-through market 
place is an essential at an NAB Convention. 

Several years ago the Convention market place was discon- 
tinued and for a good reason. It had gotten out of hand. It 
was honky-tonk. The NAB was forced to take action. 

After two years, sponsor concludes the cure is worse than 
the disease. We believe that the marketplace should be re- 
-tored, that it can be restored in a sensible, orderly fashion. 

Here is the sponsor plan. 

We recommend that, effective with the 1961 convention, 
the many services now scattered throughout the convention 
hotel be invited to rent space in a specified and easily accessi- 
ble area. Ground rules, including visiting hours and exhibit- 
ing standards, should be carefully spelled out and adhered 
to. Exhibitors should be grouped on the floor according to 
service categories. Everyone would cooperate. 

A useful marketplace will add immeasurably to the value 
of the Annual Convention. It must be restored. We urge that 
the NAB reconsider this urgent matter so that the 1961 Con- 
vention will provide a better exchange of information on 
ideas, services, and products. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Continuing improve- 
ment in radio J tv commercials. (Incidentally, 
have you registered for sponsor's 1st Ameri- 
can Tv Commercials Festival — 18-20 May?) 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Capsuled: Columnist Kupcinet in t! 
Chicago Sun-Times reported this s 
ming up by Ben Klitzner of the NA 
Convention — "From hookups to hi 
cups." 

Brrrr: RCAs John P. Ta\lor pass 
on this overheard snatch of convq 
sation between two visitors at 
RCA automation exhibit in Chicag 
during the NAB Convention— 
1st Visitor: {Looking at the aut 
motion equipment) Just think 
what that stuff will cost. 
2nd Visitor: Just think of what it 



Quote: 77 Sunset Strip star, 41 -yd 
old Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.. in Tv GuU 
— "A tv series is a fine idea for \ 
actor who is 25 or younger. He si 
has plenty of time left to live 
down." 

Information, please: An adman w 
spent some years in the Pacific v 
the Marines tells us that in Cantone 
"Ma Ti Ni" means "Kick of a hor» 

Ahoy, Hathaway: CBS TV's 1 
Skelton on At Random over WBB 
Chicago — "I'm marketing eye patcl 
for people who love Lucy hut i 
stand Desi." 

Partisan: A sponsor staffer calle< 
N.Y.C. fm radio station to ask 
some information. She said she v 
from sponsor. Replied the swi 
board gal at the fm outlet: "But tl 
would be like helping the enera 

Right, Mrs. Post? Hardwick. d.j 
KVI, Seattle, gives this etiquette I 
— "It is improper to walk out oi 
party of any kind ... Be a gt 
sport and wait until you are carr 
out." 

Definition: TV/radio coverage 
upcoming national political convB 
tions — Soft-soap operas. — Fra. 
Hughes. 



Recall: On New York Story pn 
over WCBS Radio, N. Y., a gdj 
from the U.S.S.R.'s Georgian F 
Dancers kept insisting, '".\o spik 
liss," until came the eommercia 
Dannon Yogurt. Then she toIdB 
great detail — and in pretty good EM 
lish — how yogurt was invented in ft 
homeland. Not another fix? 

SPONSOR • 23 APRIL U? 



ORDER YOUR OWN 
PERSONAL COPY OF 
SPONSOR 

SENT TO YOUR 
HOME 




ISf 






ijl" you 're getting your copy by way of the rout- 
ing slip you're probably getting it late. If you 
jfean't find time at the office to read SPONSOR 
[properly then do what many of our other read- 
ers do, order your own personal copy mailed 
o your home. 

Don't wait for a pass along copy . . . pages 
'lipped out . . . dog-eared . . . weeks late. Keep 
'posted, and really on top of the significant news, 
rends, and problems of the week, by regularly 
'eading the one book tailor-made for radio/tv 
Hiving. 

\ocp up-to-the-minute on tv/radio develop- 
ments by entering your own subscription, and 
laving SPONSOR sent to your home where 
;ou can read it at your leisure. 

MIL THIS HANDY CARD TODAY k 

jvc '11 take it from there, and bill you later. V 





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Our Readers' Service Department is ready and 
eager to assist you. This is one of the many 
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REPRINTS? BACK COPIES? '; ' I 

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35 YEARS 



RADIO WITH A REASON 



HI 



50,000 WATTS HARTFORD CONNECTICUT 

SERVING SOUTHERN 
NEW ENGLAND 




4 ft I 






WEEKLY MAGAZINE RAI 



Show-buying 
made easy 

| to pick a net that's 1st or 2nd- never 3rd- every night*) | fc»*e 3i 





1st or 2nd 


3rd 


Monday 


ABC 


NetZ 


Tuesday 


ABC 


NetZ 


Wednesday 


ABC 


NetY 


Thursday 


AiC 


NetY 


Friday 


ABC 


NetY 


Saturday 


ABC 


NetZ 


Sunday 


ABC 


NetZ 


ce: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, week ending April 17th, I960, all nights, 8-10:30 P.M. 



Is final Nielsen (before daylight saving) nails down ABC's supremacy 
l a double bang!! Not only did ABC average out 1st or 2nd every 
It of the week . . . ABC also did itself proud in the half-hour prime- 
k division! (Like taking 28 out of the possible 35, as against Net Y's 
;.nd Net Z's 17.) In fact, Net Z had more 3rd's than lst's or 2nd's. 

ABC TELEVISION & 



WHY FM 
IS PICKING 
UP SPEED 

Buyers, researcher? 
who turned deaf ear* 
to the medium are now 
beginning to buy it 



New FCC focus 
on violence 
in television 

Page 35 

The fabulous 
tv story of 
Pick-a-Pop 

Page 40 

Truth behind 
thepost-'48 
movie packages 

Page 42 




STP-TV J is the 



*§^& ;W-r- 




tat ion watcW moi^e 



Lfhan any other by 




eopleintfcisvittlmwtef! 



Net Weekly Circulation, 
ARB Total Area Report, 
January-February. 1960 



K)©® 






MINNEAPOLIS- ST. PAUL 

100,000 WATTS 'NBC 

A COLD SEAL STATION 




E Spokane, Washington 

N Seattle, Washington 

A Yakima, Washington 

Portland, Oregon 

A Eugene, Oregon 

T Sacramento, California 

San Francisco, Calif. 

1 Fresno, California 

A Bakersfield, California 

C Los Angeles, California 

S San Diego, California 

P Salt Lake City, Utah 



WBAP 
KPRC 
WOAI 
WHDH 
W J W 
WTAE 
WTOP 
WCCO 
WMAR 
WBEN 
WDAU 
WHYN 



Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 
Washington, D. C. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Buffalo, New York 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Springfield, Mass. 



W J X T Jacksonville, Florida 


WNHC New Haven, Connecticut 


WTVW Evansville, Indiana 


W C 1 A Champaign, Illinois 


W S M Nashville. Tennessee 


W R G P Chattanooga, Tennessee 


WMAZ Macon, Georgia 


WTAR Norfolk, Virginia 


K L R J Las Vegas, Nevada 


W F M J Youngstown, Ohio 


W R E C Memphis, Tennessee 


K L Phoenix, Arizona 


W 1 S N Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


KAKE Wichita, Kansas 


WOW Omaha, Nebraska 


KOTV Tulsa, Oklahoma 


K M B C Kansas City, Missouri 


KTSM El Paso, Texas 


WTVN Columbus, Ohio 


WXYZ Detroit, Michigan 


K B Albuquerque, N. Mexico 


W H 1 Dayton, Ohio 


K F S A Fort Smith, Arkansas 


WLOF Orlando, Florida 


WUSN Charleston, S.Carolina 


WISH Indianapolis, Indiana 


WAFB Baton Rouge, Louisiana 


WXEX Richmond, Virginia 


K R N T Des Moines, Iowa 


K T V Ottumwa, Iowa 


WSPD Toledo, Ohio 


W D S U New Orleans, Louisiana 


W G N Chicago, Illinois 



LMANAC 

fastest 

I0LD 
MINUTES 

in television ! 





ever before has a show 

sold so fast . . . straight 

across the call letters of the 

luntry! In less than 10 weeks 

almanac has been snapped up 

by more than 50 stations . . . with 

more orders coming in every day, 

^H The reason for this spectacular 

success? Powerful inherent human 

interest in contemporary events that 

insures audiences. And for stations . . . 

unique flexibility in programming to offer 

sponsors, almanac makes it possible to 

program 6 different times, around 

the clock ... for the price of a 

single half hour! Take advantage 

of this new concept in television 

programming that combines an 

exciting commercial 

with Dl 



w. Inc. 

,K36, N.Y. 
PLaza 7-0100 



j Richard B. Morros 

in association with 

Hearst Metrotone News Inc. 




A SALE OF TWO CITIES 

WSPA-TV sells the Spartanburg-Creen- 
wlle SUPERMARKET! From its central 
tower location on Paris Mt. near Creen- 
ville, WSPA-TV blankets the rich indus- 
trial areas in and around these twin cities. 
Over a quarter ot a million TV homes in 
this area are directly influenced by 
WSPA-TV ... it is an important part 
ot their daily lives. 

This section of the thickly populated 
Southern Piedmont is nationally recognized 
as the Big Market of today, and the Giant 
Market of tomorrow . . . WSPA-TV pro- 
gramming is tailored to serve and sell 
the Progressive Piedmont. 



WSPA-TV 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



® 



CBS in the ^SJffJ Piedmont 

Channel 7 

The only CBS-VHF Station Serving 

the Spartanburg-Greenville 

SUPERMARKET 

National Representatives: 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 



t Vol. 14. \o. 18 • 30 APRIL I960 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS UftE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Why fm is picking up speed 

31 Agency buyers, media researchers who turned deaf ears to fm two yea 
ago now begin to listen and buy. Here are the facts behind the chang 

There's new focus on tv violence 

35 E\en though the number of action shows on the network- i- le«seni:i( 
there is still much pro and con debate about violence in programin 

Louisville looks different to N.Y. media gals 

38 Agency researchers, under auspices of Broadcast Time Sales 

the market, found an ounce of touring is worth a lb. of -tatist 

Pick-a-Pop prospers on a spot tv diet 

40 Introduced last summer, this children's confection was pushed in s 
tv with 100% ad budget: this season expenditure in medium is up 600} 

The truth behind the post-'48 features 

42 The television repayment issue is over, but there is a new film sta 
still which has been created by a soft market and an anti-trust - 

Spot radio spreads Eagle's wings 

44 H°vv British airline won public acceptance, travel agency support I 
new Miami-Nassau run with six-station, 1.000-spot launching campaip 

SPONSOR'S 20 agency winners 

45 sponsor's Wheel of Fortune at the NAB convt 
winners for variety of prizes — from radios to < 



FEATURES 

56 Film-Scope 

26 49th & Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 New -maker of the Week 
60 Picture Wrap-Up 
52 Radio Results 
68 Seller's Viewpoint 
12 Sponsor Backstage 



AS Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

70 Sponsor Speaks 

28 Sp t Buys 

70 Ten-Second Spots 

16 Timebuyers at Work 

66 TV and Radio Newsmakn 

55 Washington Week 



EOS 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation •«« 
Advertising Officei: 40 E. 49th St. (49 Cr Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MUrm 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago OHice: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUpenor 7-9863 BirmingMS 
Office: Town House, Birmingham Phone: FAirfax 4-6529 Los Angeles Office: 6087 SuMrt 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore J' ' 
Md. Subscriptions: U S. $8 a year. Canada tt other Western Hemisphere 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed i 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17. N " 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage p 

©1960 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



■ Countries 5? > 



I 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 1' 




plenty of 



for selling! 



WBEN-TV covers 17 counties in New York and 
Pennsylvania, and beams a quality picture into the 
Toronto-Hamilton area of Canada. That's 20,000 square 
miles — 4,000,000 people. Plenty of space to sell in — 
plenty of people to sell. 

WBEN-TV has added more "space" in another 
dimension with its spacious modern studios. 
Advanced electronic equipment and perfect lighting 
are added reasons for using the station that already 
leads in programming and in audience. Let us give 
you facts on how your TV dollars count for more o™ 
Channel Four. 



WBEN-TV 

The Buffalo Evening News Station 



CH 

CBS in Buffalo 




ilSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



WPT/^ 



TOM ATKINS REPORTING 



ujpta 



FORT WAYNE. INDIANA 



. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



At Benton & Botcles, this week, there is a brand new poi 
thut puts programing squarely into the media battalwn- 
and a medui man uill head it. It paces a trend that is ii 
evitable icith media gaining stature while agency- show cot 
trol wanes. Question: W here uill it hit next, and when 

The newsmaker: Lee Rich, vice president in charge 
media at B&B and a member of its board of directors, now becoi 
vice president in charge of media and programing as the agencv < 
ates a new post that merges the two activities under a single baniie 

Explains B&B president Robert E. Lusk. "More and more, tv d 
mands centralization of authority to negotiate, to decide and to cM 
mit the agency for both programs and time periods with packaj 
producers and network principals. With this requirement verv mu< 
in mind, we have appointed Lee 
Rich to this newlv-created post." 
i Oliver Barbour continues as vice 
president in charge of tv and radio 
programing: Grant Tinker re- 
mains vice president and director 
of programing.) 

The move is another significant 
step in a trend which sponsor 
spotted more than a vear-and-a- 
half ago. '"Jockeying for authority 
is an old tribal custom on Madison 
Avenue." SPONSOR-SCOPE carried in 
the 2 August 1958 issue, ""but 
there's one domain on the receiving end of a lot of it nowadays: t 
tv radio department. Other areas of the agency are trying to ann 
the tv radio department as a satrapy of their own already extensi 
holdings. . . . The reaching for additional authority comes from eith 
one of two sectors, depending on the particular agency: media 
creative . . ." 

Few admen show much surprise at the turn things are taking 
today's agencv. media has been rising like cream in a milk (a 
heav\ tv investments, competitive pressures, more complex ma I 
pictures make it of first importance. On the other hand, show 
trol bj agencies has all but slipped away. Last week's SPONSOR-S 
showed it to have dropped from 5% control of net tv shows in 11 
to a goose-egg percentage this season. 

Rich, who started his ad career at Lord & Thomas, came to Bl 
in 1952 as an associate media director, was elected vice presidei t 
1955. appointed media director in 1957. Between LiT and B&B. cai 
a four-year hitch in the Navy, the 4A*s. media directorship at AN 
Frank-Guenther Law. and the same at Weintraub Agency. Wit! 1 
wife and daughter. Rich lives in Chappaqua. N. Y. % 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL ~.<M 




! Rich 



IMPRESSIONS 







IMPRESSIONS: An exclusive news concept has attracted 
a large and devoted audience for WJW-TV in Cleveland. 
CITY CAMERA and CITY REPORT (highest rated -A.R.B. & 
Nielsen) provide fast-paced picture stories of late local and 
area news twice each week night. Cleveland's biggest camera 
team and a persistent, inquisitive news staff virtually blanket 
Northern Ohio. • Yes, viewers are impressed with that extra 
sparkle on Channel 8. You are in good company and .... 



V557 



YOU KNOW WHERE YOU'RE GOING WITH 



£|WTW 

CBS CLEVELAND 



A STORER STATION • REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



30 april 1960 



^l.-*. 




\ x 



Look 
what's 



In the afternoon, 
for example . . . 

The big trend to NBC gets bigger. 

Look at the swing in viewing 

habits since NBC Television 

reprogrammed its afternoon 

lineup on February 8. 

The facts, according to Nielsen:* 

Fact... Total afternoon lineup: 

NBC Television up 36% in share, 

up 38% in rating. 

Network #2 down 8% in share, 

down 6% in rating. 

Network #3 down 17% in share, 

down 15% in rating. 

Fact... Since February, all 

six NBC afternoon time periods are 

up in share; up in ratings; 

up in homes per minute. 

Specific share increases include: 

Queen for a Day up 10%; Loretta Young 

up 67% over previous program; 

Young Dr. Malone up 36%; From 

These Roots up 23%; Comedy Playhouse 

up 43% and Adventure Time 

up 47% over previous programming. 

Fact . . . Total NBC afternoon 

lineup now averages: 33.9 share; 

8.4 rating; 3,579,000 homes per minute. 

In two months, NBC has gained 

more than a million additional homes 

per afternoon minute. 

Fact... The new total daytime picture: 

NBC Net. # 2 Net. #3 

Average Share 38.1 36.4 21.5 

Average Rating 8.8 8.8 5.6 

Half-Hour Wins 6 6 

Fact . . . Brown & Williamson, Colgate- 
Palmolive, Coty, General Mills, Mennen 
and Purex have all made recent i ^ajor 
buys in NBC's new daytime lineup. 

THE NBC 

TELEVISION 

NETWORK 



■ 

i 

m 
m 



*f§ 



m 

m 

m 

m 



There are more things in heaven and 
earth, Horatio, than are dreampt of in your 
philosophies. Also, there are more things to 
a radio station than its rate card, its audience 
surveys, its frequency and power. In all these 
respects, WAPE is a standout, but it is more. 
There is, in particular, WAPE's programming 
philosophy embodied in what we call the 
Blue Chip Broadcast Policy. 

The Blue Chip Concept is simply a con- 
scious and deliberate effort to present to the 
public, through every detail of WAPE's 
broadcast day every day, the best and most 
pleasing image that it is possible for a radio 
station to convey. 

You hear the concept at work when 
WAPE announcers are praised (as they often 
are) for sounding friendly, courteous and 
sincere. It is at work when, as happened re- 
cently, all listeners' requests for songs were 
accompanied by donations to the March of 
Dimes. 

The Blue Chip Concept dictates that the 
highest standards of good taste and sophisti- 
cation prevail in music at WAPE, that great 
and continuous attention be given to trans- 
mitting the very highest fidelity signal per- 
missible in the standard broadcast spectrum. 
It dictates also a keen sense of journalistic 
responsibility in handling news fast, tho- 
roughly and accurately. 

If you think the Blue Chip Concept fits 
well with the presentation of your clients' 
products to the public, WAPE belongs on 
your schedule. 



W A PF 25000 Watts at 690 KC 
" **■*■ U JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

Represented nationally by Radio-TV Representatives, Inc. 




I 

Editor and Publisher 
Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 
VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 
News Editor 
Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editor* 

Jane Pinlterton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor* 
Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Seff 
Llovd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 
Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurh 

Production Editor 
Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 
Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 
Helene Etelson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 
Eastern Office 

Bernard Piatt 
Willard Dougherty 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Western Manager 
George Dietrich 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg, Manaqer 
Bill Oefelein 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura Oken, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Guttman; Wills 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Flora Tomade li. 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 19l 




A toast . . . 
to another twenty-five years on 

WING in DAYTON 



May marks the TWENTY-FIFTH ANNI- 
VERSARY of Coca-Cola's sponsorship of the 
popular "Man On The Street" program heard 
daily over WING, emceed by veteran radio man 
Jack Wymer, above left. Howard Durst, ad 
manager, looks over Jack Reeder's shoulder as 



the president of the Dayton Coca-Cola Bottling 
Company renews the contract. George Lenning, 
WING account man, smiles approval. 

robert e. eastman & co., me. 



national representative 



stations WCOL. Columbus; WIZE, Springfield, Ohio; WEZE. Boston; and WKLO. Louisville are also AIR TRAILS stations 
>NSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 ] ] 



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Sponsor 
backstage 



Not so gloomy on the grass roots side 

Every so often I like to look away from the 
titanic struggles of the three television webs for 
programing and business supremacy, gaze right 
past the broader problems of the video and ra- 
dio business at large, and get right down to the 
very grass roots of the broadcasting business. A 
periodic check of those roots in some of the 
smallest iowns and the larger ones, almost un- 
failingly reveals some exceptionally interesting activitx which is like 
ly to be overlooked in the general excitement. 

Take the little town of Iron River. Mich., for example. Iron Riv 
is "Anatomy of Murder'" country. It is a lumbering and mining coi 
munity. right in the center of the rich Menominee Iron Range ai 
the Ottowa National forest. In Iron River there is a radio stark 
call-lettered WIKB. WIKB is run bv a very enterprising gentlema 
named Edwin Phelps. Jr. And whether you choose to believe this cj 
not, Iron River has a sort of svmphonv orchestra, purelv local 
personnel, which came into being as a result of a fine piece of collal^ 
ration between a local high school teacher, an optometrist and 5 
tion WIKB. 

Amateurs provide pro approach 

It happened like this: Some time ago Phelps began a series I 
classical and light concert programs from 8 to 10 p.m. each evenir 
on the station. These caught on to such a degree that the static 
manager decided it might be a good idea to broadcast a similar tvj 
music live. But how? Via the nearby Stambaugh High School Bar 
of course. So Phelps began to work with band instructor Cla 
Hounsell to present the annual spring concert of the band. 

In the weeks of rehearsals and negotiations between the static 
manager and band instructor that followed. Mr. Hounsell indicatf 
to Mr. Phelps that it had always been his ambition to organize ai 
conduct a svmphonv orchestra. At this point a local optometrist wl 
enjoyed playing violin got into the picture. He was Dr. \. \. \\ 
Strom, and presently WIKB manager Phelps was telling the g>( 
doctor and the band instructor that the station would be happ) 
foot the costs of organizing a community symphony orchestra. 

Between them, the men put together a list of musicians and mil 
lovers in the area and got these folks together. A short time bit 
rehearsals began on the second Sundav of every month at the Stai 
baugh Elementary School. Twenty-three music makers participati 
originally, and soon the group grew to 33. Enthusiasm soon reach 
such a peak that rehearsals were set up on an every week rather thi 
an everj other week basis. A tvpical example of this enthusiasm 1 
the fact that one Jerome Mascotti. a youngster studying at Xorthe 
l Please turn to page 14) 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 19 



or the first time in the 16-year history of the American Public Relations Association's Silver Anvili 
kwards, a broadcaster has been honored for accomplishments in the "Civic Enterprises" category, 
he Award was made to the WFBG Stations for their "Jobs for Joes" campaign which raised a 
lillion-dollar fund for further industrial expansion of Blair County. This successful campaign is but 
ne of many community services spearheaded by the WFBG Stations. Just one of many reasons 
hy residents of the Altoona-Johnstown area accept the WFBG Stations as good neighbors and so 
jadily welcome them into their homes. 




WFBG- AM -TV 

ALTOONA- JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

ABC-CBS • DAREN F. McGAVREN CO. • BLAIR TV 

Dperated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. /46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton, N. Y. / WLYH-TV, Lebanon-Lancaster, Pa. 
iVFBG-AM • TV, Altoona-Johnsfown, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, Hartford-New Haven, Conn. / KFRE-AM • TV • KRFM, Fresno, Cal. 
Triangle National Sales Office, 4-8 5 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 
Regional Offices: 3440 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5 / 6404 Sharon Rd., Baltimore 12 




One of New York's 
most desirable locations 

MADISON AVENUE 
AT 52nd STREET 




HOTEL 

Just steps from anywhere... 
now with 500 individually deco- 
rated rooms and suites — and 
completely air conditioned. 




17 E. 52 St. 

Your rendezvous for dining 
deliberately and well . . . 
open every day of the week 
for luncheon, cocktails, 
dinner, supper. 




I 



Sponsor backstage {Continued from page 12) 



Michigan College in Marquette, almost a hundred miles away, am 
lacking his own transportation, managed to hitchhike his way 
and forth to the rehearsals each week. 

In due time, on 14 February (St. Valentine's Day, need I add 
the first performance of the North Woods Symphony Orchestra wai 
given at the Iron River School Windsor Auditorium, with 650 payinj 
customers in attendance. More than a thousand hours of reheai 
time had gone into the readying of the community symphony orche: 
tra's first showing, which presented the "Overture to II Guarach< 
hy Antonio Gomez, the Schubert "Unfinished Symphony," selectioi 
from Tchaikowsky's "Sleeping Beauty," a special medley of Italian, 
Scandinavian, and Slovakian folk tunes arranged by Clare Hounsell 
himself, "Sibelious's "Finlandia," Carl Boehm's "Perpetual,' 
selections from "My Fair Lady." 

It goes without this additional plug that the performance was gooi 
enough to win picture and story coverage on rival radio and tv 
tions as far distant as Green Bay, Wisconsin, and a front page spreai 
in the Sunday edition of the Milwaukee Journal. Obviously, too, thi 
kind of activity redounds to the benefit of little WIKB's advertisers 

Lest we forget . . . 

In St. Louis, KMOX, just a couple of weeks later, embarked on 
community program in a non-musical area. From 3:05 to 5 p.ra 
the station dumped most of its music shows (and as an old musii 
man myself, I must insert that I think this a mistake) and presentei 
an excellent local public service show of the highest caliber, whir 
has won the station good ratings and excellent publicitv. The show 
is called At Your Service, and features local officials, businessmen 
and other prominent citizens. The first show presented the mayo 
Raymond Tucker, who after an interview with host Jack Buck, in 
vited telephone inquiries from the listeners. The KMOX board w 
rushed with calls, and listeners asked such pertinent community ques 
tions as these: 

How about free parking for downtown shoppers? 

Since the workshop is to be razed because it is over 100 years old 
why isn't the Chronic Hospital being razed? 

What are the plans for increasing the salaries of city employe* 
in 1960? 

The mayor handled these questions and others adroitly and witl 
candor, and got the show off to a fine start. 

As I said before, it is a pleasure — with all the sound and fury codl 
stantly exploding on payola and rock 'n roll, and quiz shows and pro 
graming responsibility in television, and other magnitudinous ai 
glamor-loaded propositions — to settle back and take a long look a 
radio and the grass roots, doing its good, solid, local communit] 
public service job. Too often, too many of us, including me, forge 
how much of this goes on. ^ 



Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

Do you always agree with what Joe Csida says in Sponsor Back- 
stage? Joe and the editors of SPONSOR will be happy to receive 
and print your comments. Address them to Joe Csida, c/o 
SPOISSOR, 40 East 49th Street, Neiv York 17, New York. 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 19 1 



WHO 

IS 

REALLY 

"NUMBER ONE" 

IN 

SAN FRANCISCO? 




8 position in June 1959, KEWB has seen a definite rating 
u F v U1 ve every month. 
Now, in the San Francisco/Oakland area . . . Hooper for February- 
March 1960 shows KEWB as clear-cut NUMBER ONE. Pulse shows 
KEWB with a 15.0 share and the most listeners per average 
quarter-hour. 

Make your radio buy based on current figures. Buy right in the Big 
Bay Area. BUY KEWB . . . first in San Francisco/Oakland. 






Milton H. Klein, General Ma 
EXbrook 7-2891 / TEmpleba 
National Reps: The Katz Ag 



- & 



NSOR • 30 APRIL i960 



CROWELL-COLLIER BROADCAST DIVISION 



YOU'LL NEED 

A BIG 

PUMP IN 




FILLING STATION sales in the 
WPTF market exceed those of the 
nation's 6th Metropolitan Market: 

WPTF Market $233,368,000 
6th Met. Market $ 1 96,008,000 

AUTOMOTIVE sales in the WPTF 
market are greater than the nation's 
8th Metropolitan Market: 

WPTF Market $516,471,000 
8th Met. Market $506,382,000 

AD COVERAGE WPTF is the only 
single medium that reaches all of 
this "on the go" market where 50% 
of the homes listen regularly to 
WPTF. 




50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC Alhllale lor Ro/eighDurhom 

ond Eastern North Carolina 

R H. Mason, General Manager 

Gus Youngsteadt, Sales Manoger 

PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 




( 



Timebuyers 
at work 



Hope Martinez, BBDO. New York, points out that as the days grow 

longer and daylight savings time is adopted in many areas across the 
country, it becomes increasingly more important for the buyer to 
watch for the coincidental changes in market conditions. "The sum- 
mer complex of tv viewing and program scheduling gives rise to ; 
new set of buying factors. Work- 
ing hours change, and so do peak 
viewing hours. There appears to 
be a general transition during 
warmer weather towards late eve- 
ning viewing, though the extent 
depends on geographical location. 
Some markets swell, others suffer 
a corresponding loss in population. 
Program schedules, of course, bear 
diligent watching with reruns and 
"test" shows replacing standard 
fall fare. Accordingly, the adver- 
tiser had best schedule his spots to fit in with the new season's for 
mat." Hope emphasizes that this checking of station line-ups 
pertinent to both seasonal and vear-round buyers. Spots that ap 
pear to be a terrific buy in spring, may have less pulling power tha 
selected announcements based on current mid-summer conditions. 

Dan Rubin, Mohr & Eicoff. New York, thinks that some radio sti 
tions are their own worst enemies. "There are close to 3.500 radi 
stations broadcasting these days. Now. that's enough to provide an 
buver with a shopping headache. Naturallv. the base lessens as \ 
become more selective and knowledgeable, but to a degree, the pre! 
lem always exists. Suppose I wei 
out shopping for a new tie and 
was offered a selection of 3.50 
patterns, stvles. slims and 
The salesmen would probably fin 
something to praise in ever\ 
of them, find qualities that won 
make them all 'best buys." Fj 
ther. assume there were no pri( 
tags on these items, but a i 
like complex of figures from whi< 
you had to estimate the corr 
price. I tell vou. under those < 
cumstances. I wouldn't buy a tie. I wouldn't have the time. Che 
extended or not. the parallel holds true in part for spot radio." Dl 
feels that stations must take the initiative and make spot radio eafi 
to buy. "If a strict uniformity of rate cards is impossible, it's 
least worth aiming for. Simplification of rates, discount structu e 
package plans will make radio easier and more inviting to lu 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 1'* 




~&^k> mm 




04 full color animated cartoons based on 
he 104 most popular children's records 



il'ow your young audience can see, as 
Jell as hear, their very favorite stories 
id characters. For each 6 minute ani- 
ated cartoon uses as its sound track 
lie actual recording on which it is 
used. And each recording has been 

\\tles include such favorite classics as: TREASURE 
LAND, P1N0CCHI0, PETER AND THE WOLF, 
fNDERELLA, SLEEPING BEAUTY, HANSEL 
VD GRETEL, TOM SAWYER, DAVID AND 
DLIATH, SINBAD THE SAILOR, SNOW WHITE, 
JMPELSTILTSKIN. THE UGLY DUCKLING. 



proved a best-seller by actual across- 
the-counter sales figures. Mel-O-Toons 
gives you top animation. Top entertain- 
ment. It's the perfect combination for 
record ratings in the successful tradi- 
tion of POPEYE and WARNER BROS. 
CARTOONS. Write, wire or phone... 



U.Q.Q. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, INC. 



New York, 247 Park Ave , Murray Hill 7-7800 
Chicago, 75 E. Wacker Drive. DEarborn 2-2030 
Dallas. 1511 Bryan Street. Riverside 7-8553 
Los Angeles, 400 S. Beverly Dr., CRestview 6-5886 




WPIX-11 carries more minute advertising from 
the top 25 national spot advertisers than any 
other New York television station.* ■ Leading 
advertisers select wpix-11 for the "network 
look" of its programming, its Nielsen 
proved quality audience and the guar 
an teed good company of other national 
advertisers. Your product message 
will never appear with "mail order" or 




over-long commercials -because wpix-11 does ncj 
accept this kind of advertising ■ Only wpix-1| 
of all seven New York TV stations, offers you sjji 
many opportunities to place minute commeJ 
rials in such a productive selling atmoai 
phere during the prime nighttime hour® 



■nmercials fonif ht 



WIPE 



new 
york 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



IPONtOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Colgate's E. H. Little has switched course again: he's going back this fall, af- 
ter a season's change, to his old concept of having a nighttime show by his loneself . 

Hence Bates is faced with the task — at this late stage of the buying bedlam— of finding 
not only two prime half-hour slots but two shows that will pass muster with the 
networks. And all this regardless of the general trend among the giant sponsors. 

The Colgate walkout, so far, involves Perry Mason, Rawhide, Untouchables and Laramie. 
Even continuance with Ed Sullivan is open to question. The one half-hour that Colgate at the 
moment can call its own: Wednesday, 9-9:30 CBS TV. 

Little's turn-away from the participation arrangement may extend even to day- 
time. Until only recently he's had his own shows in that sphere. 



National spot tv buying the past week showed indications of a seasonal ease-off. 

The buys out of New York included General Mills' O-Cello (DFS) , Reader's Digest ( JWT) 
and French's Instant Potatoes (JWT). 

Activity in Chicago included: Climalene (D'Arcy) ; P&G's Lava (Burnett) ; Skinner's 
Raisin Bran (Bozell & Jacobs) . 

In Chicago radio: Continental Airlines (JWT, Chicago) ; Standard Oil burner service 
(D'Arcy) ; Schlitz (JWT) ; Curtis Candy's new Miracle Ade (Frank). 

You can always count on a P&G agency to break the norm: Benton & Bowles would 
like to embark on a two-minute commercial in spot tv come the fall for a new P&G 
product. 

The query that went out to stations from B&B the past week: If the two-minute idea is 
okay, which would they charge — double the minute rate or the five-minute rate? 

A cross-check by SPONSOR-SCOPE of reps disclosed that the consensus favored double 
the minute rate, because the five-minute rate entitles the advertiser to but a minute 
and a half of commercial. 

Another P&G agency, DFS, had toyed around with a 90-second spot for Dreft, but after 
a similar inquiry the idea was dropped. 

The two-minute spots, naturally, would have to be scheduled in movies. 

P.S. : B&B expects some stations to reject the two-minute plug on the ground 
they're already criticized for over-commercialization. 

NBC Radio's concept of selling News Around the Clock in sizable packages seems 
to be catching on with spot advertisers. 

Standard Oil of Indiana has the idea going on both WGN, Chicago, and WHB, Kan- 
sas City. Involved in the latter case are 98 spots a week. D'Arcy Chicago is the agency. 

If you're wondering about the sales prospects for the summer, here's what major 
reps are telling their stations and here's what the networks are hoping. 

The reps: If your station is running 10-15% ahead so far this year — and that applies 
to both tv and radio — the ratio should continue for the summer. 

The tv network: the added 30% discount for the summer should have the effect 
of (1) keeping current users on the air and (2) attracting seasonal accounts. 

Added commentary on national spot radio : Reps say stations are so loaded with cigarette, 
gasoline, auto and coffee business that — for the first time in years — they're turning down 
schedules from these categories. 



30 april 1960 



19 



L- 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Merck's chemical division, which spends about $350,000 on farm radio, is faced 
with the old dilemma of high power vs. local reach. 

The account is weighing this recommendation: to concentrate its budget on a few 
midwest 50kw's and upper-powered outlets instead of spreading the money over many 
rural-community stations. 

Why the Merck people are reluctant to switch: the field salesmen catering to the farm 
trade have their favorite local outlets and the personal identification with the stations 
is too strong for them to give up. 

According to Nielsen's 24-market count, the Academy Awards telecast this year 
drew several million more homes than it did the year before. 

The comparison of averages: 

YEAR RATING SHARE 

1960 48.1 84.5 

1959 47.9 81.3 



Colgate (see preceding page) wasn't the only one of the soap giants to act up 
against the tv networks this week. 

Partially because it didn't like the treatment it's been getting from CBS TV and NBC TV 
in laying out the fall nighttime schedule, Lever Bros, cancelled what amounts to about 
$500,000 in third-quarter daytime billings on the two networks. 

Veteran Madison Avenue observers see the actions of Lever and last-tycoon Little as the ! 
preliminary gestures in a simmering rebellion against the policies and attitudes of the 
networks which may lead to severe Washington repercussions after the elections. 



Now the Wander Co., makers of such beverage standbys as Ovaltine and Toddy, is di- 
versifying: a confection, called Sports Bar. 

Tatham-Laird is test marketing it in tv. 

Recently it was reported that Mars was thinking of going into the beverage field. 



With the 1959-60 season drawing to a close, here's a comparison of how well 
leading agencies did in picking their tv network fare — be it exclusive series, alternate 
sponsorship or participation in spot carriers. 

The following comparison is based on programs that have survived the past season as against | 
those that are being dropped: 



AGENCY 


HELD OVER 


DROPPED 


BATTING AVERAGE 


Bates 


4 


5 


.444 


Benton & Bowles 


4 


3 


.571 


BBDO 


1 


1 


.500 


Burnett 


4 


2 


.666 


DFS 


2 


2 


.500 


Esty 


1 


2 


.333 


JWT 


2 


4 


.333 


McCann-Erickson 


4 


2 


.666 


Lennen & Newell 


3 


4 


.428 


SSCB 


1 


3 


.250 


Y&R 


4 


4 


.500 



You can't blame the agency for looking that far ahead these days, what with the! 
two-week cancellation and the 30-day-confirmation-before-starting-date. 

The Cruttendon agency, Chicago, this week wrote reps about September availabilities. I 

sponsor • 30 APRIL 1960 1 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The tv networks have an answer, other than the assertion of program responsibility, 
to the mounting outcry from agencymen that they're being arrogantly squeezed 
into buying network-controlled shows or else. 

According to the networks, they'd be better off financially if they didn't have to program 
their own schedules, but they have no choice for these reasons: 

1) Advertisers are neither willing to experiment with new types of program- 
ing nor are they coming through with quality fare. 

2) If the networks didn't control the programing, they'd be in a spot come 
renewal time, since the advertiser would be in a position to move a successful show to a 
competitive network. 

Make that a total of nine shows and 5l/> hours a week P&G will be sponsor- 
ing on the tv networks at night this fall. 

Latest addition to the roster : alternate sponsorship with Quaker of the Tom Ewell skow 
(CBS), which means (1) three-network positioning for the Cincinnati giant; (2) a 
record budget for the network side of the medium. 

What with new products on the way, you can be sure there'll also be a lot of new money 
for tv spot. 

ABC TV expects to gross about $6 million from the 17 American Football 
League games, the rights to which it's just acquired. 

Package price per game (time, rights, production) : $360,000. 

CBS TV's anticipated gross from its National Football League games: $7.5 million for 
the season. 



Another car — Plymouth — has settled on its 1960-61 network choice: an alter- 
nate hour of the Garry Moore show. 

It's for 39 weeks plus a summer filler. Estimated time and talent nut comes to $5.5 million. 



NBC TV daytime pulled another one away from CBS TV: Dumas Milner 

(Perma-starch and Pine Sol) was the account and the swag, three quarter-hours a week. 

Another NBC TV daytime sale this week: two quarter-hours weekly through the 
summer to Jergens. This $170,000 came out of spot. 



Olin Mathieson has passed up renewal of Small World and committed itself for 13 
CBS Reports net season at an outlay of about S3 million. 

The tv network this week also broke the sponsorship ice of the summer Olympics, haul- 
ing in Lorillard for a fourth at $740,000— the price covering everything. 



ARB's latest (March) breakdown of viewers per set for all network programing between 
10 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays shows (1) that women account for but half the audience 
and (2) the women in the middle and higher age groups — as was true in radio — 
are the dominant lookers. 

First, the breakdown by sex and ages of the sexes: 

TOTAL PER SET WOMEN MEN 

1.62 .83 .23 

Now the breakdown of the women by age groups: 
TOTAL PER SET 18-29 30-39 

.83 .18 .21 



13 to 17 


12 


YEARS & UNDER 


.14 




.42 


40-49 




50 & OVER 


.16 




.28 



• 30 april 1960 



21 







SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Behind BBDO's query of tv stations this week as to how they stood on sumi 
plans or discounts is this thought : if enough stations in important markets ad. 
ed the idea, more of the agency's clients would be inclined to summer buying. 

Along with sending out the inquiry BBDO invited the reps and trade press to the exl 
of a study comparing summer ratings, CPMs and billings with the rest of the year. 
(For recent summer rates developments see 5 March sponsor article, page 32.) 

That old wheeze about nothing succeeds like success can be applied to the p] 
ent scramble among tv stations to latch on to Kellogg's spot tv trio, Hucklefo 
Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Woody Woodpecker for next season. 

The threesome has proved so popular in the last several ratings that stations which 
season made no effort to get this kid business are now in there submitting els 
rate presentations to Burnett. 

No small motivation in the quest: the strip would make a powerful lead into their i 
work lineups. 

In view of animated cartoon experts the ratings of two cartoon series on ABC 
— Bugs Bunny and the Flintstones — will be particularly worth watching next seai 

ABC apparently believes the success of the Disney line can be repeated, and, if this t 
out to be correct, the trade, say these specialists, can expect the other networks to 
on this half -hour type bandwagon. 

What especially puzzles the experts: whether there are enough trained people in I 
animation techniques and devising story lines to go around. 

A scanning of ABC TV's latest tabulation of network tv usage by parent coi 
nies during 1949-59 reveals these two interesting sidelights: 

1) Only 28 companies have been consistently in the medium during thd, 
years and with one exception, Speidel, these were also the leaders in network radio. 

2) Only one account, also Speidel, can be compared to spot tv's wonder child, Le 
in that the medium can take large credit for the company's phenomenal success. 

An interesting thing to note: who picks the crime-mystery shows — writ 
doesn't have to compete with a bland type of program. 

Here's a breakdown for every 100 homes of the selector factors for eight such type s 
based on the April Trendex: 



PROGRAM 


MEN SELECTORS 


WOMEN SELECTORS 


UNDER 18 SELEC 


Bourbon Street 


53 






49 






18 


Hawaiian Eye 


49 






48 






28 


Johnny Staccato 


56 






50 






11 


Mr. Lucky 


44 






46 






30 


Peter Gunn 


56 






44 






15 


77 Sunset Strip 


51 






56 






24 ! 


Tightrope 


54 






46 






26 


Untouchables 


67 






54 






19 1 


The "bland" opposition: Lucky vs 


La 


wrence Welk 


; Gunn 


VS. 


Danny 


Thomas; 1 


cato vs. The Real McCoys ; 


Bourbon Street 


vs. 


Father Knows Best. 









TvB's current pitch to the nation's top breweries: try daytime tv beanie* 
the housewife to counteract the private labels in the chain stores. 

Surveys show that 70% of supermarket beer sales are of an impulsive nature, whick ; 
an edge to the chain's private labels — uniformly priced beneath advertised brands. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, pag| 
Spot Buys, page 28; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; i 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 66; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL I 




Not all the rockets in Florida are launched at Cape Canaveral. Many a product 
— new or otherwise — blasted off on WFLA-TV has rocketed into a high sales orbit 
in no time flat! 

And it's not surprising when you consider that Florida's population is growing 
by 3,000 new residents each week from the other 49 states. 

Add to that, Florida's 8 million annual visitors and you quickly see the profit 
opportunity — and the sales test opportunity — in this great cross-section of America. 

Want more details on the Land of Profitunity? Write us, or call your BLAIR- 
TV man today. 

Figures from Sales Management 1959 Survey of Buying Power. 



ATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES, BLAIR-TV 




OR • 30 APRIL 1960 



LL 



M 




SS * ft 

about vibz-n, 

BOSTON 



MOST 

0/ a# Boston TV statio: 






A<„. 



R 

H 

I 

AWARDS 



l\id look at these other facts about WBZ-TV! ■ Most local air personalities — more 
I an any other Boston TV station. ■ Most national advertisers of any Boston TV station 
• 193 compared to 148 for the second-place station. ■ Most newscasts of any Boston TV 
fcntion. ■ Public service programming — 234 hours and 12,667 spot announcements 
xintributed last year to 203 charitable projects. ■ Largest TV share of audience.* 
W That's why in Boston, no TV spot campaign is complete without the WBC station — 

WBZ-TV 

BOSTON 

Represented by- 
Television Advertising 
Representatives. Inc. 



^©WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. I 




KSDO 



Your top salesman in San Diego's 
total market is KSDO*. a Hooper- 
rated strong second on all time seg- 
ments ... and ask the Daren F. 
McGavren man for our latest pulse 
. . . it's BIG. KSDO is strongest by far 
in audience-holding programming that 
gets sponsors results both morning 
and night. Careful selection of fine 
music begins with Limelight, an early 
morning and mid-afternoon feature. 
Late evening listening to mellow 
music on Gaslight Revue, with Even- 
ing Concert, from 8-10 pm, present- 
ing the world's great music by out- 
standing artists. Four 10-minute News 
In Depth segments are spaced thru 
the day and evening. Advertising is 
limited timewise- screened tastewise. 

KBUZ Phoenix AM and FM 
KSDO San Diego AM 

best fine radio buy 

in the booming-buying southwest 

THE GORDON BROADCASTING CO. 

-Sold notionally by Daren F. McGavren & Co. 




49th and 
Madison 



Correction noted! 

For the seven days combined, Mon- 
day-Sunday, from the January-Febru- 
ary St. Louis Metropolitan Area 
Study, which, incidentally, is the lat- 
est study released, WIL is the leading 
station from 6 a.m. -12 midnight. 

George Sternberg 
service director 
The Pulse 
N. Y. C. 

• WIL challenged the advertising statement 
as published in SPONSOR of another station 

aimed to lead in St. Louis ratings. WIL's 
hip in The Pulse rating is confirmed 
above. 

Same questions, other places 

I would like your suggestion re- 
garding copies of filmed spot com- 
mercial ads which were once put on 
the air in the U. S. 

Practically, I have no idea how to 
collect copies such as I.D. cards, sta- 
tionbreak spot commercials and 
other short term spots for television 
advertisement. Despite their value to 
be used again, they usually are dis- 
posed by the agencies, I imagine. It 
will be a great help for us to improve 
the air advertising if we can collect 
them for some research use, although 
most of them are useless for direct 
use in Japan. 

For the first, I would like the ad- 
dresses of top 50 air agencies listed 
in SPONSOR magazine of December 
26, 1959, so that I can write them 
asking them to offer the copies they 
keep in their hand. And for the sec- 
ond: If there is any way to collect 
them at one time (place), please let 
me know the way to do so. 
Makoto Komatsu 
manager, Dai-Ichi Kokoku Sha 

Advertising Agency 
Tokyo 

• SPONSOR b aUav- happy to furnish its 
readers »ith information, either in this column, 
or as in the rase of Mr. Komatsu. under sepa- 



Self-imposed torture 

I've read with incredulity and awe 
Coy Palmer's sad saga (sponsor, 16 
April I of the life of a co-owner and 
general manager of a radio station in 



that grand and glorious second- 
gest state. I don't doubt his vera* 
only his sanity. What does the i 
co-owner do while Coy knocks | 
self out? 

CP obviously subscribes to 
myth of the indispensable man. 
good executive knows how to dele] 
authority. If a co-owner must 
himself such a monstrous schedul 
earn a mere living, he'd better 
out and go to work for a hu: 
being. On the other hand, if 
quintupling in brass while 
awa\ a great deal more than a I 
because he doesn't want to pay 
help, he's paying too much for 
money. Let him hire an adequate 
to take the load off his back and 
be able to spend more time selli 
and maybe at higher rates. 
Dave Xowinson 
promotion manager 
American Broadcasting 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Bravo! 

By Godfrey, your "Comme 
Commentary" column of 12 
is terrific! 

Somebody, but somebody, on 
run off a zillion reprints and i 
them down the craws of the diar 
idiots who take curious delight 
their pusillanimous polemics in 
cizing television. 

Something ought to be doi 
the tv industry to combat this 
way traffic nuisance of cantanb 
criticism. 

It's getting so bad that 
siders like Susskind, Serlinu 
others are tempted to snap a 
hands that feed them. The 
grape fever is becoming epiden 

As the greatest of all med 
mass communication, television 
creatively and intelligently a )] 
measure of its own effectiveness 
only in courageous self-defend 
also in a positive, competitive 
torial manner. 

Peter A 
May woo f , 

SPONSOR • 30 APRI ; 




Our Wisconsin farm families are distinguishable today only by their 
added incomes! This is truly the bountiful Land of Milk and M 
Thousands of big dairy farms . . . scores of clean small citie 
400,000 TV families enjoying CBS-ch. 2 television. 
We'll do a hay-maker of a job for you! 




J~ BAY 
f°" NUM. 

UK 



MANITOWOC 



SHEBOYGAN 




: f>]0R • 30 APRIL 1960 




Top COVEB&GE 

BONDS COVERAGE 



^VRLPch aBne i32 

BRATTLEBbRo.VT. 
GREffNFfELPsMASS., KEENE.N.R 

# G.PHOLUNGBERV HAS DETAILS 



\ational and regional i 
i work now or recently comply 



SPOT BUYS 






H 



n I 



k 



RADIO BUYS 

Noxzema, Baltimore, Md.. buying for their sun-tan lotion. 

Noon, in 50 market*. Summer campaign, to begin early June 
slated to last for three months, using all minutes concentrated 01 
around weekends. Frequency range will he between 20 and 25 
per week. Buyer: Boh Anderson. Agency : SSCB, New York. 
Standard Brands, New York, buy ing for its Siesta Coffee, will 
off its spring campaign early in May in about 25 markets. Siesta 
use tnainl) minutes and 2u"s with heavy frequency. Buyer: G 
Sawyer. \genc\ ; Ted Bates. New York. 

General Foods Corp., White Plains. N. Y.. entering 4 Florida 
kets for Postum earh in May for 52 weeks. The buy is for late ai 
noon and evening minutes on personality shows. Frequent 
average about five spots per week. Buver: \nn Jacknowitz. Ag 
Young & Ruhicam. New York. 

TV BUYS 

Ideal Toy, New York, will he starting the largest campaign i 
historv in September in the top 50 markets. The campaign I 
for 1 I weeks. Ideal will be buying on kiddie shows, aims for a s 
ration schedule. Buyer: Bett\ Nasse. Agency: Cre\. New V' 
Toni Division, Gillette Company, Chicago, buying for all p 
nets with its three Chicago agencies splitting the market lists bert 
them. The campaign will begin 8 May and continue for 18 > 
through 10 September, with dav and night minutes in 60 marl 
Vgencies: Tatham-Laird: North, and Clinton E. Frank. Buy 
Don Douglas iT-Li. John Harper (Nl, and Ruth Babick (CI 
Carter's, New York, for its dipilatory. Nair. is hu\ing in 
major markets with an early Ma\ campaign starting date. The 
is mainb nighttime minutes. Bmer: Dick Weller. \genc\ : 
Bates. New i oik. 
Kelvinator Division, American Motors, Detroit, will begin a 
phase of its continuing campaign for its washers 2 May in i 
than 60 markets. Kelvinator will be using all daytime minutes 
Ws. Buyer: Bett) Powell, \geno : GMMB, New York. 
Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, buying in major markets acf 
nation mainh nighttime minutes for Tide. Campaign slated to 1 
in base markets earh Ma\ : other markets staggered thereafter 
ei : Bernie Shlossman. \.gency: Benton & Bowles. New "l ork 

RADIO-TV BUYS 

Wiedemann Beer, Newport. K\.. kicking-off a heavy campM 

leading markets in the Ohio Yallex in mid-Ma\ for 1 5 
mann will be using traffic and weekend minutes on radio and a 
bination of minutes. 20'> and I.D.'s on prime t\ time, wit: I 
fringe evening buying. Inner: Dick Olsen. Ageno : DCSS. Nev h 



SPONSOR • 30 *TRI 



fatterpot 



I %■■ IWi ■vwl Yon rafce in mucfc 
, T more audience when you put your sales message on 
KELO-tv SIOUX FALLS and its booster hookuos. 




ed from Nov. ARB 6 
ri.m. 7 days a week. Sur- 

ow that KELO-LAND 
' the same general rate 

■iority all hours. 




KELO-LAND tv gives you . • . 

48.6% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Omaha station 

49.2% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Des Moines station 

46.8% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Duluth station 

84.3% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Sioux City station 

96.0% MORE VIEWERS than the highest rated Fargo station 

And KELO-LAND'S husky audience outdelivers TWO of the four Minneapolis-St. Paul 
stations, by 204.5% and 10.5% respectively. YOUR BET, MR. ADVERTISER! 

kelQlane* 



KPLO-rV 



General Offices: Sioux Falls, S.D. 

JOE FLOYD, President • Evans Nord, General Manager • Larry Bentson, Vice-FrcS. 

Represented Nationally by H-R In Minneavolis: Waune Evans d~ Associates 



SEAT GREAT GREAT GR 

bulous fabulous fabulous jab 
IRJE tvfflQIRJEi] DiAOR,: 

HEST HIGHEST HIGHEST HIGHES 

J9& tops tops tops tops] 



ERRIFIC TERRU 

IGANTIC GI 

ader leader 




{Just a matter of Relativity) 

• WBTV-CHARLOTTE IS FIRST TV MARKET IN ENTIRE SOUTHEAST WITH 595,200 TV 
WBTV DELIVERS 43% MORE TELEVISION HOMES THAN CHARLOTTE STATION "B '* 

*Television Magazine— January 1960 

**NCS # J 



LET'S COMPARE MARKEi 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 

WBTV 

CHANNEL 3 ® CHARLOTTE 



WBTV-CHARLOTTE 

ATLANTA 

MEMPHIS 

LOUISVILLE 

MIAMI 

BIRMINGHAM 

NEW ORLEANS 

NASHVILLE 

NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH 

RICHMOND 



695 2| 

571 5 
483 2 
459 C 
434.9 
425 1> 
381 S 3 
344 43 
339 7? 
271 C? 



^ SPONSOR 




I'FIRST': Grace Lines is back in radio after 20 years — this time its fm. Eight fm stations in eight 

:ets are the line-up; buy was direct (clients often lead agencies into fm). Men behind the buy (I to r): 

He Lines officials Frederic P. Sands, dir. of p.r. and advertising; David D. Townsend, assistant pas- 

r traffic manager; Godfrey Macdonald, v. p. passenger traffic; and Roy Holmes, Walker-Ewald Co. 



lia buyers who turned a deaf ear to fm two years ago are beginning to 
it. Reasons: a million fm sets sold last year, fm auto radio, more data 

s week saw another breakthrough for fm as advertise its jet service. At the same time, United is 

al major advertisers moved cautiously into the considering other markets. 

ally filling pool. On the East Coast, Esso Another recent first for fm is Grace Lines' present 

S), after two months of researching the medium, 13-week schedule running on eight fm stations in 

i a test fm schedule for its Golden Crest premi- eight markets. Of special significance, this buy I it 

|;asoline in the Boston market. On the West was direct) marks Grace's first time in any radio in 

United Air Lines (Ayer) comes into fm for 20 years. 

1 rst time with a 13-week buy in Los Angeles to Like spring blossoms, fm is busting out all over. 



OR • 30 april 1960 



31 



But there are two sides to the fm 
ledger, and not all entries are in the 
hlack. Indeed the whole fin story is 
one of dogged persistence slowly and 
painfull) winning against consider- 
able odds. On the bright side of the 
ledger: enthusiastic broadcasters 
aided b\ technical developments and 
the promise of more developments to 



come. On the darker side: advertis- 
ing agency timebuyers still cry out 
for more documentation of the medi- 
um in order to justih their recom- 
mendations for its use to clients. 

Oddly enough, it is the clients 
themselves who — without all this 
documentation — are leading their 
aaencies into manv of the fm nation- 



al buys which are now being n 
The truth is that the docunn 
tion for fm is not as bad as 
admen say, not as good as it c 
be. It has relied on the qualit 
the audience rather than the 
tit\. and this kind of research 
put the average agencv bu\e 
analyst on something of a spot. 



!i ' 



SURVEYS A 

MARKET 


CROSS U.S. TURNED UP 

MOST 
AVERACE DAILY POPULAR AUDIENCE 
LISTENINC TIME HOURS ACE 


THESE 

AUDIENCE 
INCOME 


FACTS ON FM 

AUDIENCE 
AUDIENCE EDUCA- 
OCCUPATION TION 


NEW YORK 


3 hours 


8-10 p.m. 


37,5 years 
average 


49.2% between 
$7,500 and 
14,999 


5479? 

professional 
or executive 


46.8° 
college 
graduate 


SAN DIEGO 


31.7% listened 
3-6 hours 




96° adult 


75.8% between 
$4,000 and 
13,000 


33.5 % 
professional 
or executive 




SAN FRAN. 


6.6 hours 


6-9 p.m. 


34 years 
average 


$8,800 average 




60,1 

college 
graduate 


PHILA. 


5 hours 






$9,000 average 


63.7% 
professional 
or executive 


68.2° c 

college 
graduatej 


MINN.- 
ST. PAUL 


3.5 hours 




59° in the 
21-40 range 


$7,800 average 


63.59? 

professional 
or executive 


60% 

college 
graduate 


DETROIT 


5.3 hours 


5-11 p.m. 


43 years 
average 


46.8% between 
$7,501 and 
15.000 


379? 

professional 
or executive 




HOUSTON 


2.1 hours 
(median) 


6-9 p.m. 


37.3% in the 
35-49 range 


47% between 
5,000 and 

14.999 


31.8% 
professional 
or executive 


21.7 : 
colleg- 
gradufti 


U.S. 

xoriicKs. • puke 1959 BO. 
THMN M. kSSOt 1 \TlOH OF 


v\n.\ WLOJ I 

I'M 1!KO\Im W| | k- 


6-9 p.m. 

I Summei 1959. 


37° in the 
35-40 range 


49.6% between 
$5,000 and 
10,000 

nil .luly 1919. t Co 




a by XA 1 


















I ENCY SPONSOR: Unique in tm is I he Z.akin <~o., IN.T. ad agency, which sponsors I 
I ltoge program on WABC-FM, N.Y., uses commercials institutionally tor advertising pro- 
f ion. Al Zalcin, (fourth from I), agency head, meets with (I to r) Joan Hart, continuity; Jirr 
EJu, producer; Rog Coleman, fm chief; Mike Fabian, coordinator; Ted Eisenberg, assoc. pdcr 



st media bought on mass circula- 
many admen are reluctant to 
ise a buy that doesn't show up 
.the numbers. "It's a funny thing," 
.imebuyer told sponsor, "but al- 
ijugh we ourselves listen to fm and 
know a lot of our friends listen 
:m, we're still scared to move with- 
numbers."' 
\ctually, there are a lot of num- 
|s coming into the fm picture: 
„» Today, there are an estimated 
p million fm receivers being used 
the U.S. 

V Set sales in 1959 were over one 
llion. (At the NAB Convention 
Chicago. Henry Fogel, president 
f Granco Products, predicted an- 
r il sales of 4 million sets by 1963.) 
f The number of operating fm sta- 
tins in the country rose from 591 
JJ958 to 696 by the end of 1959. 
l • Fm set penetration continues 
y stantial (see chart I . 
■ I'" About 43.5% of all homes in 
H. have fm sets. 
. • Of these homes, 51.3% listen 

37'; of fm listeners are 35 to 
& years old, about 25% are 19 to 

<11 More than 21% of fm listeners 
h e an annual income ranging from 

IjiOO to $10,000. 

In a number of markets, fm sta- 
lls are turning up in Hoopers, fre- 

•^'ntly beating out some am stations. 
1 New York City fm station has 

i appearing in Hartford Hoop- 
er i "Fm may not be hitting No. 1 

1 s," says Otis Rawalt, of Walker- 
Rj'alt Co. which represents Quality 
« ic Stations in 31 markets, "but it 
BVhowing signs of reaching posi- 



tions that will force admen to con- 
sider it when making buys." 

The fact is that admen are con- 
sidering it, not in battalions, but 
rather single spy. In connection 
with this growing awareness of fm, 
here are some significant points about 
how they regard it: 

• Once they've bought fm, adver- 
tisers generally seem to stick with it, 
expand into new markets. Examples 
of the moment: BO AC just renewed 
its fm campaigns in Boston, Detroit, 
San Francisco, and Chicago. Arnold 
Bakeries renewed in five markets, 
Tuborg Beer just renewed on two fm 
stations in Texas, has begun in New 
York, will be starting in Detroit in 
May, and will soon expand its fm 
into other areas. 

The Tuborg case is interesting. 
This brewery moved into fm in Octo- 
ber 1958 with buys in San Francisco 
and Los Angeles, by the following 
spring showed beer sales up an aver- 
•age of 55% between those two mar- 
kets. In July 1959, Tuborg added 
Houston to its fm campaign. By 
September, it had doubled its sales 
there over the same month in 1958. 

• A number of influential agency- 
men are becoming fin's best spokes- 
men. One of these, Dave Kimble, 
senior account executive at Grey, 
says. "Fm presents two distinct op- 
portunities for advertisers: (1) For 
the seller of the 'Cadillac' type of 
product, the luxury, 'class' product. 
1 2) For the seller of any new or 
renewed product in any field in order 
to get to the 'highly mobile' trend- 
setters who are so influential on the 
tastes of the rest of the populace." 

• An interesting sidelight on the 



growing regard for fm among the 
advertising agency fraternity is the 
news that on New York's new fm 
outlet, WABC-FM, a Manhattan ad- 
vertising agency, The Zakin Co., is 
a regular sponsor, using its commer- 
cials as a sort of "public service" on 
behalf of the whole ad industry. 
• Popular pattern of fm buying 



FM PENETRATION 
PICTURE BRIGHT 
IN THESE AREAS 


ALBANY, N. Y. 


33.1 


BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 


32.4 


BALTIMORE 


27.9 


BOSTON 


50.1 


BUFFALO 


34.8 


CHICAGO 


42.4 


CINCINNATI 


26.9 


CLEVELAND 


36.1 


COLUMBUS 


37.4 


DALLAS-FORT WORTH 


20.7 


HOUSTON 


30.6 


KANSAS CITY, MO. 


29.5 


LOS ANGELES 


48.9 


MIAMI 


31.7 


MILWAUKEE 


21.1 


NEW ORLEANS 


24.1 


NEW YORK 


56.7 


NORFOLK-TIDEWATER 


29.4 


PHILADELPHIA 


36.3 


PITTSBURGH 


30.1 


PORTLAND, ORE. 


46.1 


PROVIDENCE 


35.1 


RICHMOND 


28.1 


ROCHESTER, N. Y. 


41.9 


SACRAMENTO 


26.1 


SAN BERNARDINO-RIVERSIDE 


25.7 


SAN DIEGO 


39.4 


SAN FRANCISCO 


47.3 


SYRACUSE 


24.1 


TRENTON, N. J. 


32.9 


WASHINGTON 


40.3 


WESTCHESTER CO., N. Y. 


61.4 







NSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



FM ADVERTISERS 
LIST SMACKS OF 
NAME-DROPPING 



SINCLAIR REFINING 



CINZANO VERMOUTH 



TUBORG BEER 



AIR FRANCE 

CAPITAL AIRLINES 
JAPAN AIR LINES 



UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD 
LANVIN PARFUMS 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 
HERTZ RENT A CAR 



CARLING BREWING CO. 



READERS DIGEST 
A & P FOOD STORES 
HAMILTON WATCHES 



BALDWIN PIANO CO. 



BUDWEISER BEER 

ALUMINUM CO. OF AMERICA 



ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA 

RYBUTOL 

REXA LL DRUG CO. 

McCALL'S PUBLICATIONS 
FORD MOTOR CO. 
CHRYSLER MOTORS 



BURGERMEISTER BREWING 

BOAC 

UNITED AIRLINES 

ROOTES MOTORS 

ROSE'S LIME JUICE 
RY-KRISP 

SCHWEPPE'S TONIC 
DANISH BLUE CHEESE 
DINERS' CLUB 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 
GOODYEAR STORES 
PEPSI-COLA 
STEINWAY PIANO 
GRACE LINES 



^oday is a half-hour sponsorship a 
Week plus a schedule of announce- 
ments. The fact that the advertisers, 
who are coming into fm as sponsors, 
are relying on the station-built pro- 
graming, suggests, as one adman put 
it, "that fm is bringing entertainment 
back to radio." 

One of the indications that fm is 
attracting sizeable and significant 
audiences in the markets where it's 
operating is the interest evinced by 
listeners in the fm programing maga- 
zines that are beginning to appear. 

Cue Magazine, with an ABC circu- 
lation of 165,000 concentrated in 19 
counties of Metropolitan New York, 
added, in February 1959, an eight- 
page fm section. Each week, it lists 
fm programs for the New York area, 
was by Cue's own admission the re- 
sult of pressure from Cue readers. 

Cue has had a survey made by 
Bennett-Chaikin, Inc., attributes to its 
fm section over 20,000 new subscrib- 
ers. Newsstand sales have gone up 
10% since the section was adopted. 

On the West Coast, in Beverly 
Hills, fm station KCBH recently be- 
gan an fm program guide which 
quickly reached 5,000 circulation. 

Another indication of the vigor 
that fm is showing is the way radio 
set manufacturers are jumping on 
the bandwagon. Zenith now has 14 
new models of receivers, some am-fm, 
some only fm. German and Japanese 
imports of portable and car fm sets 
have been standard bearers for the 
medium. 

Price, once a problem in fm sales, 
is now being cut down. Granco, 
which has become a serious competi- 
tor in the fm radio field (figured to 
be second to Zenith I is doing well 
saleswise with an fm-only set that 
retails at $29.95, is also bringing out 
an fm tuner at $19.95. 

Garages and service stations in fm 
markets are reporting considerable 
business in the job of installing fm 
sets in automobiles. 

Motorola has jumped into the for- 
eign car trend to pitch its line of fm 
car radios. (In Akron, for example, it 
is now using fm to promote sales. I 
There are some in the advertising in- 
dustry who feel that fm may eventual- 
ly develop its own "prime traffic 
times" during daytime just as am 



has done. In fact, portable radio ai 
car radio are going to be large U 
tors in any strides that fm mal 
from here on in. Reason: fm is int« 
ference-free. 

Behind the attention that fm h 
grarlualK been getting during t 
past two years are the dedicated 
forts that have come from within 
own broadcasting ranks. 

The National Association of Broa 
casters has lent a lot of impetus 
the drive; its monthly issue of Fl 
Phasis, now in its second year 
publishing, has kindled a good d^ 
of enthusiasm. Some of this entlj 
siasm was reflected in the whoppi 
attendance at the "FM Day" sessi 
at the recent NAB Convention 
Chicago. 

The National FM Association 
been doing a sizeable missionary j 
Then there is the Southern Califorr 
FM Association, an organizati 
without dues, loosely hung togetl 
but tightly knit in their single-mir 
ed dedication to promoting the me 
urn. ( All fm groups, although 
members are in competition, fui 
tion with a sort of all-for-one-ai 
one-for-all spirit that almost takes 
the form of a movement or cau 
If, for example, the National Asso 
ation of FM Broadcasters and 
Radio Advertising Bureau ever 
cide to promote the medium togeth 
the results might be electrify in< 
The So. Calif, group, for exai 
has promoted such items as an S 
converter for changing am car rad 
to fm; sold out factory production 
a 90-day period. 

Other crusaders for fm are stati 
groups that have lined up like i 
works and which specialize in 
kind of music that, according to si 
veys, attracts about 50% of its au 
ence. Some of these are: Coi 
Network, Good Music Broadcaste 
Qualitx Music Stations, Fine Mu 
Hi-Fi. They all report increas 
business this year. 

All of these are attempting, 
their budgets, to bring more do( 
mentation to the fm story, as i 
man) individual fm stations vhi 
are sponsoring audience surveys 
their markets. The Pulse has do 
a number of market sur\c\s (| 
I Please turn to page 69) 






30 APRIL 19 






FCC EYES 'EXCESSIVE VIOLENCE' ON TV 

Excessive violence is one of four main issues confronting the broadcast industry, Federal 
Communications Commission chairman Frederick Ford told the National Assn. of Broad- 
casters' convention in Chicago earlier this month. Excessive violence points up the need 
"for greater license responsibility to insure stations are operated in the public interest" 
he asserted, documenting his statements with samplings of complaints from such groups as 
the National Council of Parents, Teachers, formidable because of 12 million members 




HERE'S NEW FOCUS ON TV VIOLENCE 



jie issue of crime and violence on 
expected to be hotter than ever 
season. 

addition to the continuing com- 
ts about "excessive tv violence" 

certain selected sectors of the 
c, the FCC is expected to scru- 
for the first time, network as 

as local station schedules — a 
lostication clearly indicated from 



Tv's self-appraisal as well as external criticism 
prompting less violence, fewer action programs 

But the furor goes on about the nature, dimension 
violence and its possible effect on youngsters 



Chairman Frederick Ford's comments 
above. 

The FCC's job is no simple one. 
Aside from the touchy aspect of cen- 
sorship there are these questions: 

Is violence, per se on the wane? 
Should it be? And, for that matter 
what is it? Only Webster seem 
to have clear-cut definitions, 
because few concerned 



^ 




with the problem ever seem to come 
to grips with what is a very slipery, 
hard-to-define issue. 

The complicated nature of the 
problem emerged from discussions 
between sponsor editors and a vari- 
ety of persons involved with violence 
on tv. To a man, those interviewed 
agreed that the issue needed further 
study. Their reasons varied. Some 
tited the difficulties in defining vio- 
lence; others noted that the emotion- 
al responses to violence were not nec- 
essarily uniform; still others voiced 
concern about its possibly adverse ef- 
fect on viewers — particularlv chil- 
dren. 

So much for the highlights of the 
qualitative side. To pin down the 
much simpler quantitative facts, 
sponsor surveyed network program 
schedules for the past four seasons as 
well as the upcoming one. The study 
indicated a trend away from those 
program types in which violence can 
normally be expected. 



From a low of 27 such programs in 
the '56-'57 network tv season, the 
number of so-called "action" shows 
rose to a peak of 53 in '58-'59 and to 
54 in '59-'60. But there's an evident 
decline, with only 49 tentatively 
scheduled for showing next fall — the 
bulk on ABC TV, with 20. followed 
by NBC TV with 16 and CBS TV 
with 13. 

These programs, however, reflect 
only the number of possible show cli- 
mates for violence. Violence occurs 
in many forms in all types of pro- 
graming (with one children's expert 
citing Lassie as the ultimate in ten- 
sion-creating, anxiety-building plots 
in a children's feature). 

Violence, per se, has long been 
banned by all elements within the 
broadcast and advertising industries. 
The Tv Code of the National Assn. of 
Broadcasters, subscribed to by 60% 
of the nation's tv stations, admon- 
ishes them as follows: 



" I Ik use of horror for its own sake w 
eliminated; the use of visual or aural < 
Hindi would shock or alarm the viewer, an 
detailed presentation of brutality or pli 
agony by sight or by sound are not pel 
hie. ... I he station should exercise part 
restraint in and care in crime or mysterv 
sodes involving children or minors and 
ing material which is excessively > 
would create morbid suspense, or other uw 
able rea< lions in children." 



The rules are simpler than 
definitions, however. As a senior 
president of a Top 10 ad agency c 
mented, "The effect of violence 
composite of many factors. Ev< 
one's against it. But we need to Id 
what violence really means. Some 
gressive, violent actions are laug 
at and never taken seriously. Oth 
which may be much more subtle,, 
fearfully frightening." 

Everyone agreed that violence! 
its own sake should be and is ! 
hibited. But there is inadvertent 
lence — and there is also the factol 
quantity. 

Many lay groups of interested j 
professionals place great stress on 
number of murders, robberies.. 



VIDEO ACTION SHOWS WILL DECLINE NEXT SEASON 

This five-year program trend, based on an analysis of sponsor's March tv Comparagraph for the 
past four seasons and on its estimate of program fare for the 1960-'61 season, indicates a decline 
in action shows after a significant peak in both the '58-'59 and '59-'60 seasons. These shows 
lend themselves most to overt rather than to subtle violence: western, adventure, and mystery 



Number of action Total no. Number of action 
shows, by network action shows shows, by type** 

ABC CBS NBC 



Number of action shows, by type and network** 
ABC CBS NBC 



'60-'61* 20 13 i 6 49 



'59-'60 


23 


13 


18 


54 


'58-'59 


18 


15 


20 


53 


'57-'58 


16 


10 


11 


37 



'56-'57 



27 



22 12 15 



28 


10 


16 


26 


8 


19 


14 


12 


11 



13 


4 


6 


5 


3 


5 


10 


3 


5 


11 


2 


5 


7 


2 


6 


8 


4 


8 


8 


7 


1 


2 


3 


5 


4 


2 


5 



••W— Western: A— adventure : M 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL '. 



ihts and gun blasts originating 
jeklv on tv screens. Charles Sin- 
air, tv author and motion picture 
iter who has written private eye 
id action-mystery plots, says this: 
"Most of the shouting about tv vio- 
lce is about the sum total during, 
v. a week of prime time shows. The 
luble here. I think, is that writers 
d producers think of theirs as the 
ih show that will be on the air that 
ght. A murder in a tv script may 
fine, for that particular show. But 
; j there are four or five murders, 
iggings or muggings between sev- 
{.al prime time programs, the tv 
i itic can all too easilv point to the 
• mulative effect. What's needed, per- 
ps. is more over-all editorial con- 
1)1 of script and program content to 
J ovide more rotation of violent storv 

This suggested "over-all editorial 
ntrol." of course, places the prob- 
' n directly in the hands of the 
"Itwork lor station I continuitv ac- 
I ptance people. These people, too. 
I id to evaluate — perhaps rightlv so 
, a script on its own merit, rather 
I an as one of perhaps six elements 
I a single night's program schedule. 
I Many persons, however, confuse 
onflict" with "violence." Stockton 
» dlfrich. director of continuity ac- 
l ptance for NBC, attempts to define 
Tese basic terms. "Conflict or ag- 
ession is a fact of life, exists in the 
al world on all fronts and all too 
ten spills over into overt clashes be- 
i een contending parties. Conflict is 
I t of necessity violent, but as the de- 
1 ee of it increases it sometimes he- 
mes so." 
; An agency president, commenting 
this and other phases of the sub- 
1 t. made the statement that "the 
idest howls go up about violence 
ten it appears in an insipid pro- 
am . . . and a whale of a lot of 
I '?m are downright inept and stupid ! 
-| je classics are loaded with violence, 
j d no one objects, because the ac- 
n is an integral, moving part of 
'I Ivelopment." 

(He continued: "There's a lot of 

, oping about violence in action, but 

'atrical pros know that some of the 

' '>st violent emotions and reactions 

B evoked by such non-active forces 

* sounds, peripheral sights, settings. 

I Please turn to page 50) 





EVERYONE TALKS ABOUT VIOLENCE ON TV . . . 

PSYCHOLOGIST Ernest Dichter, Inst, 
of Motivational Research, New York, 
comments: "Westerns are an American 
"Odyssey" superficially gunplay and 
noise. (People like them because) life 
is inordinately complex; they feel a sense of frustration 
and hopelessness. . . . Horror films horrify and fascinate 
because they show forces outside of control." 

ACTIVIST Clara S. Logan, president of 
N4FBRAT. Los Angeles, says: "Broad- 
casters have refused to listen to protests 
about excessive violence when there's a 
large audience of children, and the spon- 
sors evidently refuse to be concerned. . . . There's plenty 
of evidence that these programs have harmful influences. 
Shame on you, broadcasters!" Her group is the most vocal. 

ADMAN, Rollo Hunter, tv/radio v.p., 
EW R&R agency, New York, says: "Vio- 
lence we have, but it could be worse. So 
jar this season, we haven't come up with 
cannibalism "Suddenly Last Summer," 
emasculation "Sueet Bird of Youth," incest "Oedipus Rex." 
But I understand Susskind is considering a script on simony 
(illegal traffic in sacred objects)." See adjacent story. 

1PKQ91H EDITOR, Mrs. Era Grant. National 

|^^ JB Parent-Teacher magazine, which pub- 

{■4^. *M lishes monthly "Family Guide for Better 

*% ^^ Viewing," says: "Parents don't wantchil- 

^H^A^HII dren to view programs that take them on 

voyage of violence. With few exceptions, this voyage they 

take at turn of a dial. Success seems to depend on hoiv 

many dead men pile up in 25 minutes." 




OXSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 




FIRST STOP during tour of Louisville was at WKYW 
FC&B, and Lee O'Brien, BBDO, met gen. mgr. Jay Th( 



^%gency media researchers don't 
often have the chance to get out from 
under station statistics and visit a 
market first hand. But when they do, 
it's an eye-opening experience. 

Last week, two New York media 
research executives had their eyes 
opened. Marian Jackson, supervisor 
of media research at Foote, Cone & 
Belding, and Lee O'Brien, supervisor 
of (overage and station analysis at 
BBDO toured Louisville. 

These researchers, who don't usu- 
ally get into the areas that marketing 
men do, were able via this trip to get 
a unique taste and feel for the mar- 
keting problems of their clients. These 
are some of the grass roots facts they 
discovered: 

• Louisville is a thriving metrop- 



olis, with all the "huff and puff and 
go" of a northern city. The economy 
is good; the construction and devel- 
opment of new homes and shopping 
areas very active. 

• Louisville is a strong radio city, 
with local retailers using the medium 
as a prime advertising source, since 
it's just a two-tv -station market. 

• Louisville is a contest-happy 
city. 

The trip was part of a Broadcast 
Time Sabs program of sending time- 
buyers or research directors of the 
Top 20 ad agencies to the various im- 
portant radio markets across the 
country. 

Host to Miss Jackson and Miss 
O'Brien was Jay Thomson, general 
manager of WKYW, who arranged a 



full day's schedule of interviews i 
visits. Accompanying them also 
Don Softness, promotion consult) 
to BTS. 

The group met at the studios 
WKYW to begin the day's activi 
which included a tour of the stali 
a brief trip around Louisville and 
virons, and visits with an import 
local agency, a large appliance d 
er, a drug store, a supermarket, 
a food distributor. They also sper 
great deal of time monitoring 
sounds of various stations. 

"I was surprised," noted M. 
Jackson, "upon hearing that one 
the leading stations there has a 
40-type format. Unless you have 
tuallv heard the station, visited 
facilities, and met the people 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL lj 



HOOKS DIFFERENT TO N.Y. MEDIA GALS 

i (discover that an ounce of market touring is worth a pound of station statistics 




iLOEMER FOODS opens door of its ware- 
house to Lee, Don Softness, BTS p.r. consultant 



erned with it, you don't really know 
t. Literature can be deceiving. 

"I also found that a low rated sta- 
ion, like WKYW," Miss Jackson con- 
inued, "can have good local ac- 
ceptance. It follows then that there 
oust be such result-getting acceptance 
imong low-rated stations in all sec- 
ions of the country which, while 
•ossibly not suitable for a low cost, 
ligh turnover item, would be an ex- 
remely good buy for many other 
linds of products." 

At the retail outlets, the research- 
es asked numerous probing ques- 



APPLIANCE DEALER Pete Faucette looks 
t"he-d to further growth and development of 
Louisville as Marian and Lee share his outlook 



TAYLOR'S REXALL drug store manager J. Sin- 
shows Marian FC&B client Johnsoi Wax displa 



30 april 1960 




tions of the managers, concentrating 
on peak shopping hours and days, 
and the various factors which influ- 
ence the movement of merchandise, 
especially, of course, clients' products. 

Thej were also concerned with the 
extent to which distributors influ- 
enced media selections, with the shelf 
displays, and the space given to the 
various clients' products as compared 
with competitors, and with the ac- 
ceptance of the different brands. 

"While there I discovered that 
Louisville is one of the most contest- 
happy cities in the country," observed 
Miss O'Brien. "Nowhere else did I 
ever see one complete wall in a super- 
market decorated with entry blanks 
for every nationally sponsored con- 
test." On the other hand, the BBDO 
researcher noted that the market was 
relatively poor for couponing. "Con- 
sumers just preferred sales, 'twofers' 
and contests." 

Misses O'Brien and Jackson also 
had the opportunity to estimate the 
extent of car radio usage. "When 
seeing a market first hand, one can 
judge in a rough way whether autos 
are predominantly used by shoppers 
and -workers, or whether public trans- 
portation is more convenient," Miss 
Jackson said. 

At the local agency, Siegel Col- 
grove & Associates, the New York re- 
searchers got a glimpse of media se- 
lection techniques from president 
Harold Siegel. 

"There is absolutely no correlation 
between high ratings and sales re- 
sults," Siegel stated flatly. When mak- 
ing regional buys, he telephones lo- 
cal agencymen in each of the mar- 
kets he will use to get their impres 
sion of the local stations and their 
effectiveness for various advertisers. 
In his opinion, this method is far 
superior to relying on ratings. 

Carl L. Schuele. president and gen- 
eral manager of Broadcast Time 
Sales, summed up the purpose of 
these trips with this explanation: "I 
want buyers and researchers to see 
for themselves the dominant and vital 
force which radio exerts in the lives 
of the people all across the country — 
a perspective you can't get from your 
desk in New York. We also want to 
point out that spot radio is actually 
an extension of the client's local sales 
staff." ^ 



The fabulous spot tv 
story of Pick-a-Pop 

^ Indianapolis company introduced new-style popsicle 
in 1959, buying only high-rated afternoon cartoon shows 

^ Now Fran will is heading into 105 (maybe 147) mai 
jor tv markets, aiming to reach youngsters coast-to-coast 



I Indianapolis 

n less than a year. Franwill, Inc., a 
small manufacturer of confections, 
has put a new popsicle called Pick-a- 
Pop in the big time. The firm will 
push it via spot tv in from 105 to 147 
markets this summer. 

In both the initial campaign last 
summer, and in the expanded pro- 
gram for the current season, only one 
medium has been used: spot tv. How- 
ever, the difference between last sum- 
mer, when 29 tv markets were 
reached, and this summer, is a six- 
fold increase in budget. 

Franwill, Inc., has had no com- 



parable previous experience distrib 
uting such a product nationally. B« 
fore its innovation of Pick-a-Pop las 
May, the company sold nut and pop 
corn confections principally. 

The agency set-up provides anothe 
surprise: both Walter Bagot am 
Randall Albright — who together cor 
stitute Randall & Bagot — are unde 
25. and have been in operation as a 
agency just for a year. Before tha 
the) were with an Indianapolis age 
c) which had serviced Franw ill. Bag< 
was radio/tv director of the agenc] 

Despite the youth of the agenc 



BROCHURE for food b 



3d by Walte 



wnwixi. ion iuou uroneri is icannea uy "auer 

ipals of Randall & Bagot. Both the agency and 



Bagot (I) and Randall Albright, youthf 
Pick-a-Pop are marking their first birthde 




40 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL '. 



SAGA OF NEW PRODUCT'S ONE-YEAR GROWTH 

MAY 1959: Framvill, Inc., of Indianapolis introduces a new freeze-at-home popsicle, Pick-a-Pop. 
Advertising is placed in the hands of a fledgling agency, headed by broadcast-minded Walter Bagot 



SUIVIIVIER 1959: Sale of nearly five million eight-pack packages is secured. Distribution 
reaches partially across country. Budget is entirely in spot tv, for children's shows in 29 major tv markets 



DECEMBER 1959: Pick-a-Pop is shown at food brokers' convention in Chicago. Food men 
like fact that refrigeration is not required, and the mark-up is good. Additional sales areas are confirmed 



SPRING I960: Four other food manufacturers announce they will make similar item. Net ex- 
posure is set by one competitor: alternate week sponsorship of 15-min. segment of CBS' Captain Kangaroo 



APRIL I960: Franuritt again puts entire budget in spot tv, buying children's shoivs in 105 areas. 
Hinging on distribution build-up, 42 more markets are eyed. Loyalty of young viewers is key aspect 



incipals, the campaign bears the 
{amp of purposeful planning — and 
jjsults of last summer clearly proved 
ut the strategy. 

Marketing has been helped by the 
ovelty of the product itself. Pick-a- 
op comes in liquid form, with sev- 
ral ounces of syrup sealed in a poly- 
hylene bubble. The housewife puts 
le entire Pick-a-Pop in the ice com- 
artment of the refrigerator at home. 
Jhen hard, the plastic can be slit at 
ne end. and the frozen bar eaten as 

slides out of the cover. 

Last summer, over 4,969,000 pack- 
ges were sold, each containing 8 
ops for 29*. W. A. Williamson, 
resident, and Clark Francis, secre- 
try-treasurer of Framvill, are relying 
)lely on food brokers for distribu- 
on. They are expecting that full na- 
onal distribution will be accom- 
lished this summer. 

Walter Bagot, president of the 
gency and the partner most closely 
ancerned with Pick-a-Pop, is using 
>cally originated afternoon kids' 
lows: cartoon strips conducted by 
opular performers. These children's 

:rsonalities do the Pick-a-Pop com- 
lercials live, with suggested scripts. 



30 april 1960 



"The well-known local personality 
who hosts the show commands in- 
credible respect and loyalty from the 
child viewers in his market. He is a 
remarkably effective salesman for 
us," says Bagot. "The performer 
tailors our script to suit his format 
and audience. For instance, where 
puppets are featured predominantly, 
they usually help deliver the commer- 
cial — much to the delight of the 
young audience." 

He finds the local children's show 
personalities ready to give strong 
promotional support with store ap- 
pearances, and stations cooperative in 
merchandising help. 

The path to distribution has been 
helped by a high profit factor on 
Pick-a-Pop, and fast turnover dur- 
ing the warm months. The most ap- 
pealing feature to food retailers, how- 
ever, is that no freezer-cabinet space 
is needed. Instead, the item can be 
packed and shelved as ordinary drv 
goods. According to Clark Francis, 
six facilities in different parts of the 
country are now in operation making 
Pick-a-Pop — two of which are con- 
tract packers, and four of which are 



plants owned by Framvill, Inc. 

Randall & Bagot have already 
placed orders for 105 major tv mar- 
kets. Invasion of the additional 42 
markets will be decided in the next 
few weeks, according to how success- 
fully distribution can be built up. 
Bagot says that food brokers have 
been highly responsive to Franwill's 
strip cartoon show plans. Average 
spot frequency is thrice weekly, and 
starting dates have been staggered to 
conform to weather patterns. South- 
ern schedules began as early as 6 
April, while in Canadian border 
states, the dates are held off in some 
cases to mid-June. 

One mark of success — but not an 
unalloyed pleasure — is the competi- 
tion that Pick-a-Pop will face this 
summer, inspired, says Bagot. by the 
strides Franwill made last summer. 
General Foods is testing an entry 
called Kool Pops in the Mid west 
and Norwood Coffee Co. of Chicago, 
with Pop-Ice, is one of several others 
readying similar products. Pop-Ice is 
using network tv, but Bagot ex- 
presses only mild concern. The Nor- 
wood schedule is for one 15-minute 
(Please turn to page 47) 



WHY UNION SETTLEMENT HASN'T MELTED THE POST-48 FREEZE 



1. 



BIG FEATURE FILM users stocked with 3 to 7 year supply have created a soft market 
affecting most theatricals. Feature film sales have been sluggish for past six months. 



2. 



SIX LEADING DISTRIBUTORS are facing uncertainty of an anti-trust prosecution for 
"block booking" practices. Issue is whether films will be sold separately or grouped. 



3. 



STILL NOT ON MARKET are older features like the Goldwyn package and some 
Columbia and Universal 6e/ore-1948's. Station men say that sellers have waited too long. 



ACCEPTANCE QUESTION still faces some postA8's on content and wide-screen re-edit- 
i ing to tv standards. Adult thematic material, CinemaScope process pose new problems. 



5. 



"WATCH AND WAIT' attitude is station strategy for future pricing battle on post-'48 
i feature films. Buyers are interested in newer features, but don't want higher prices. 

STATIONS' PRESENT LIBRARIES have successfully withstood late night ratings com- 
' petition of Jack Paar. Late movie ratings show greater predictability and stability. 



THE TRUTH BEHIND THE POST-48's 



^ Union issue over, but soft feature film market 
and anti-trust battle create a serious film standstill 

^ Well-stocked stations see ratings of 'Late Show' 
firm against up-and-down threat of live 'Jack Paar' 



■ or months eyes have been riveted 
on the union negotiations over talent 
repayments for tv use of feature films 
made since 1'-* 18. It has been assumed 
that a settlement would break the dam 
on a flood of new feature films. This 
fresh supply might then revolutionize 
timebuying, station film investment, 
and the distribution industry. But 
none of these predictions are work- 



ing out according to expectations. 

The repayment issue has finally 
heen settled with a compromise on 
1960. freeing the post-' IS's I films 
made between 1948 and 1959) for 
immediate distribution. 

But there's no flood of new product 
on the market. The distribution busi- 
ness is on the dreary side. Stations 
are takinir a cool attitude toward new 



features. And nothing radical ha 
happened in timebuyers' patterns. 

The question is this: What has hap 
pened to dampen or delay the effec 
of the liberation of the post-'48's? 

There's no single key to this tan 
gled situation, but several strong fac 
tors and motives are at work. Th 
feature film market, first of all, i 
said to be glutted. For six month 
there's been a buying slump. Sta 
tions are saying they have three t> 
six years' supply or more and an 
in no hurry to buy. 

Second, the big question mark 
an anti-trust prosecution hangs ov 
the distribution industry. Six leadii 
syndicators have been named as d 
fendants in a government suit < 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 19Ci 



liblock booking" practices whereby 
patures are sold in groups which mix 
jperior. average, and lesser product. 
A third factor is the unanswered 
j uestion of the acceptability of post- 
j'-8's to tv. Some are based on adult 
lliaterial, perhaps too much so to 
I ueet the Tv Code. Others were shot in 
flltra wide screen processes which, 
|| hile they can be re-edited to meet tv 
|i:reen standards, may or may not 
II rove satisfactory. Beginning with 
I 3th Century Fox's "The Robe" in 
1 353, Hollywood set out to create 
1 1ms that would be as unlike tv as 
issible, and Cinemascope and other 
' rocesses were specifically designed 
I >r this purpose. 

I Fourth, the edge has been taken off 
I te demand for post-'48's to some ex- 
I nt by the stockpile of before-1948's 
I ill kept off the market. These include 
lie Goldwyn package and some Co- 
l mbia and Universal pictures. Sta- 
ton men sav that distributors waited 
I >o long and now the market has 
■ iftened. 

Finally, important station buyers 
I kch as leading independents and sta- 
I on groups are taking a "watch and 
I ait" attitude. They're interested in 
*|e post-"48's. but they're concealing 
i ly enthusiasm which might lead to 
marked advance in prices on the 
iwer pictures. 

Therefore the post-'48's bomb is 

or the present, at least) a dud. 

Timebuyers can only maintain a 

alistic attitude and watch ratings 

•suits until some time in the future, 

and when the situation changes. 

There's also this additional factor 

j hich has averted an immediate cri- 

%& on the post-'48's: late evening 

atures haven't suffered drastically 

| om the "live" competition of Jack 

| Mr. Although Paar's headlines have 

|:,tracted considerable audiences at 

lies, seasonal studies of his ratings 

low that they have also dropped ap- 

| reciably at other times. Feature 

. 1ms in the late evening are the more 

redictable buy of the two. (See 

Ijacent chart.) 

From October. 1959. to March, 
?60, Paar enjoyed rating crests dur- 
£ his two weeks in Hollywood, the 
eek of the "W. C." indictment, and 
he week of his return, and his rat- 
,gs reached a low toward the end of 



LATE NIGHT HOLDS UP WELL IN SUMMER 

Sets-in-use 
1 1 p.m. -mid. M id. - 1 a.m. 


ALL YEAR AVERAGE 


27.7 




14.8 


SUMMER AVERAGE 


26.4 




13.9 


NON-SUMMER AVERAGE 

NTI, Mar. 1959-Feb. 1960; time is local except N. Y. 
Aug.; non-summer is Mar. -May 1959 and Sept. 1959-Feb 


28.1 

I960. 




15.1 

Summer is June- 



his absence from the show. The multi- 
city Arbitron for this period showed 
that Paar on NBC TV had a 25-week 
average of 9.4 while Late Show fea- 
tures on CBS stations averaged a 9.5. 
The CBS features were ahead during 
15 weeks, Paar was ahead 9 weeks, 
and there was a tie one week. 

The Jack Paar-Late Show com- 



petition for ratings is a continual one, 
and researchers have looked into sets- 
in-use figures to see whether it's prin- 
cipally a shift of audience or a new 
audience that accounts for Paar's rat- 
ings crests. Apparently Paar got more 
people to tune in during the first 
three of the four crest weeks cited 
(Please turn to page 46) 



RATINGS CONTEST: 


MOVIES VS PAAR 


16.0 
15.0 




4 


14.0 
13.0 


1 


1 


12.0 


A A 


? fl 


10.0 


A/A 


^ A Jl 


9.0 | 


w Ivxi 


A-v /I 11 


8.0 


x JY W 


IA \/LI 1 


7.0 


xy / ^ 


A V )N \i 


6.0 


/^W 


iaa i Jy 


5.0 


V 


*\inf 


4.0 




\r V 


3.0 




V 


2.0 
1.0 





V 

3 


OCT. 


NOV. DEC. |AN. 


FEB. MARCH APRIL 


1. 
2. 


Paar in Los Angeles 
"W. C." incident 


3. Paar's absence from show 

4. Return week 


Xote: Late Show ratings on CBS stations are more stable, more predictable 
than Paar on NBC TV. Source: Multi-city Arbitron. M-F, 11:30 p.m.-l a.m. 



i 
k 



SOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



Spot radio spreads Eagle's wings 



^ Airline opens Miami-Nassau run with 1,000-spot, six- 
station blitz; exceeds first month's sales goal by 23.4% 

^ Goes after tourists, travel agents with a.m., early 
evening, and nighttime buys, heading up for weekends 



^Lagle Airways' job had barely be- 
gun when CAB approval of its Miami- 
Nassau flight finally came through 1 
March. The British carrier, though 
known in Nassau, was a newcomer to 
the Miami market. Public acceptance 
and travel agency cooperation were 
needed to establish the new franchise. 
Furthermore, with the peak tourist 



season soon to run its course, there 
was virtually no time to waste. 

Eagle's agency. Keyes. Madden & 
Jones, had $30,000 to work with in 
the inauguration campaign. To spot 
radio went the lion's share because. 
as KMJ. New \ ork. v.p. -manager Jack 
Bailhe puts it, "With the right buys 
we could pinpoint the specific groups 



STRATEGISTS of massive radio drive launching Miami-Nassau run meet at KMJ, N. Y. office 
Conferring (I to r): Al Hudson, Eagle adv. mgr.; KMJ v.p. Jack Bailhe, a.e. Bud Gallano- 









k '■■MUi 
^3~_- — M n 




* ^ta |^ - xJ^'S 


^m 


, T m^^M^ 







we had to reach in heterogeneou 
Miami, and hit them frequently. 

'"And with its out-of-home au< 
ence and ability to reach listene 
during the limited time they are 
doors, spot radio competes succ 
fully with Miami's main attracti 
the sun." This is vividly illustrate 
in Eagles first month seat salei 
23.4'; above the projected figure 
spite competition with Pan America] 
Mackey and Bahamas airlines, 
established on the route. Also. Ea: 
reports a subsequent stead\ rise 
sales. 

Eagle did it with a six-stati' 
1.000-spot saturation which engulfed 
the Miami area late February throua 
April. Timebuys were hand! 
through KMJ's Miami office, headi 
by v.p. Dick Stern. Heaviest sj 
concentration went to weekends wh 
tourists are most plentiful, thoug 
there was a healthv array during t 
week. Favorite time slots were ea 
morning and early evening when t 
indoor radio audience is sizeable, an 
to a lesser extent late at night for trj 
same reason. There was alsr 
siderable reliance on portable radj 
carriage of the Eagle message durin 
beach time. 

The tourist-oriented station bu 
WKAT, considered especially str< 
on the beach: WGBS, a.m. new- a 
Canadian news i "A perfect examp 
of radio's ability to pinpoint aud 
ence." savs Bailhe. '"What better vi 
to reach the large number of Cai 
dian tourists in Miami?" 1 : \^ CK1 
news on the hour: WAFM i FM 
late evening classical music: ^ IN 
full-power station, early a.m.. la 
afternoon spots: WMBM. appeals l 
Negro audiences, with dividend of 
following in Nassau from wh»c 
mam Negroes go on excursions 
Miami. 

Eagle's e.t.'s. a mixture of 2Q 
30's. and 60's. were delivered for tl 
most part by Capt. Vyvyan Robins >l 
a pilot with the airline. His gen 
British-accented pitch was calcula 
to gain attention through conti 
with harder sell, more elaborate c< 
mercials on the air. His accent a 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 1 



I 



quaint reference to the "double one" in 
Eagle's telephone number I Franklin 
7-2011) has impressed listeners; 
many who call for reservations seem 
to get a kick out of feigning a Brit- 
ish accent and saying something like, 
"I sav. old chap, is this Franklin 
r f7-2-0-double 1?" 

Eagle considers its best prospects 
"for the Miami-Nassau run to be Mi- 
ami vacationers already familiar with 
•the local scene and on the lookout for 
a new side trip. The travel agent is 
often a key figure in this situation. 
He may be the one to recommend 
Nassau, and in doing so advises mode 
<of travel. He would hesitate to sug- 
gest an airline not known to his 
client. 

i From listening to his Eagle-satu- 
rated radio, the travel agent learned 
.that the public was hearing about the 
(new entry. KMJ supplemented this 
with direct mail informing agents of 
Eagle's heavy radio advertising as 
vivell as the timing of its four round- 
(trip daily flights. The personal touch 
hvas added with visits to travel agents 
siby company officials, including Eagle 
president Harold Graham. 

In addition to direct mail to travel 
agents, Eagle supplemented its spot 
iradio drive with tv spots, billboards 
•and print. The tv venture covered 1- 
27 March and consisted of 32 Paar 
and Garroivay cut-ins over WCKT- 
TV, Miami. The spots, which ran 
Wednesday through Friday, were a 
combination of film and slides with 
voice over. During March, Eagle 
placed two ads per week in two 
Miami newspapers. And the airline 
icontinues with outdoor advertising, 
ij which it has employed from the start. 

The opening spot radio blitz is 
| over, but Eagle is maintaining con- 
tinuity wtih a small-scale spot radio 
schedule in May. Expansion of serv- 
ice appears to be in the offing for 
Eagle now that the Cunard Steam- 
Ship Co. has purchased a controlling 
interest. There is talk of additional 
flights within the Western Hemi- 
sphere, plus eventual certification of 
a London-New York route. At KMJ 
it is felt that such expansion in 
Eagle's operations would be accom- 
panied by heavy spot radio promo- 
tion, based on the medium's highly 
successful handling of the Miami- 
Nassau assignment. ^ 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



SPONSOR AWARDS PRIZES 
TO 20 AGENCY EXECUTIVES 



Y&R MAN TOPS CONVENTION WINNERS 



1. WARREN RAHR, Young & Rubicam, New York, (am-fm radio) 

2. RORERT GEARY, Mathisson, Milwaukee (table radio) 

3. RRIEN SCHWEIKART, Camp-Ewald, Detroit (percolator) 

4. JOHN HARPER, North Adv., Chicago (electric tray) 

5. GEORGE STANTON, Burnett, Chicago (blender) 

6. A. S. TRUDE, JR., C. E. Frank, Chicago (electric tray) 

7. RONALD BOBIC, D-FS, New York (electric blanket) 

8. R. D. KIMBLE, Grey Adv., New York (electric sharpener) 

9. DON HELLER, N. W. Aver, Philadelphia (steam iron) 

10. JOHN COLE, NL&B, Chicago (steam iron) 

11. PAUL THERRAULT, Y&R, New York (percolator) 

12. MARIAN JACKSON, FC&B, New York (steam iron) 

13. HOPE MARTINEZ, BBDO, New York (steam iron) 

14. RUTH BABICK, C. F. Frank (knife sharpener) 

13. ETHEL WIEDER, Compton, New York (knife sharpener) 

16. STEVE SUREN, SSCB, New York (knife sharpener) 

17. JOHN KINSELL, McCann-E., Cleveland (knife sharpener) 

18. ROBERT CROOKER, Camp.-Ewald, Detroit (4 trays) 

19. GEORGE BOLAS, Tatham-Laird, Chicago f4 trays) 

20. CHARLES MC CANN, MacFarland, Aveyard, Chicago (trays) 



#%gency people in several cities this 
week will receive an unexpected prize 
as a result of their participation in 
sponsor's Wheel of Fortune game at 
the National Assn. of Broadcasters 
convention in Chicago earlier this 
month. 

Warren Bahr, associate media di- 
rector at Young & Rubicam, New- 
York, is the top winner among 20 
agencv people and will get a large, 
table-model am-fm radio combina- 
tion. A complete list of the winners 
. appears above. 

Here's how they won: sponsor's 
hospitality suite at the convention 
featured a Wheel of Fortune spun by 
every person visiting the headquar- 
ters. The number on which the wheel 
landed corresponded to the number 



assigned to agency people attending 
the convention who had registered 
for sponsor's contest. At the close of 
the convention, those agency people 
with the most votes (the highest num- 
ber of spins) received prizes one 
through 20. 

Some 80 agency executives from 
both large and small buying centers 
were registered with sponsor for the 
contest. 

Other prizes were given to suite 
visitors who spun the number they 
selected in advance of spinning the 
wheel. Among them: John Buzby, 
Headlev-Reed. Chicago; Ray Jones, 
AFTRA. Chicago: Bill Erin and 
Marian Monahan. NL&B. Chicago; 
Janet Byers, KYW, Cleveland; How- 
ard Eicher, WSAI. Cincinnati. ^ 

45 



POST-'48't 

i Continued from page 43 i 

above, and the sets-in-use figure shot 
up. But on the week he returned to 
the show the audience flow appeared 
to be at the expense of the feature 
film competing on CBS. 

However, both Late Shou fea- 
tures and Jack Paar are the benefici- 
aries of some new tendencies in late 
evening viewing which are reported 
in reoentlj released Nielsen studies. 
A surve) released last month, but ac- 
tually prepared in March 1950. shows 
thi> about all-week audiences of post- 
11 p.m. programing: 31.0', of its 
households have an income over 
$8,000, compared to 26.5' < under 
$5,000 and 28.9', in the $5,000 to 
$7,999 mid-range. So it's a relatively 
wealth\ audience that is attracted to 
post-11 p.m. tv viewing. 

Another Nielsen disclosure spells 
good news for summer late evening 
tv spenders. Nielsen Television Index 
shows a negligible drop in summer 
viewing after 11 p.m.. reporting on 
both the 11 p.m. to midnight and 
the midnight to 1 a.m. periods. The 
12 month sets-in-use figures average 
out to 27.7 and 14.8 for these peri- 
ods, studying March. 1050. to Febru- 
ary. 1060. The three-month summer 
period of June. July, and August. 
1050. averaged sets-in-use figures of 
26.4 and 13.0. respectively, drops 
of 1.4 and 0.0 below the annual 
figures. On the other hand, the 
nine-month average of fall, winter, 
and spring months were 28.1 and 
15.1. which are only 1.7 and 1.2 high- 
er than in summer. 

TvB issued another report which 
shows the pronounced increase in late 
evening spot spending. There has 
been an absolute increase in late eve- 
ning spot spending, and also a rela- 
tive increase in the amount of spot 
spending which goes into late eve- 
ning. Thus late evening's spot share 
rose from 0.0' , in 1957 to 10.0', in 
1958 and then again to 12.3', in 
1959. In each of these vears late eve- 
ning spot land total spot l rounded 
off to si 1 ($449) million, $56 ($512) 
million and $76 iS615i million. 

The continued economic health of 
late evening features is due in large 
measure to the wide cross-section of 
advertisers currently using its Late 
Show and Early Shan features in- 

16 



dicated that according to number of 
spots purchased they ranked by prod- 
uct as follows: 

1 i laundry goods and detergents 

2 l cosmetics 

3 ' headache remedies 

4 i electrical appliances 

6) personal apparel I mostly Inter- 
national Latex and its Maiden- 
form products I 

7 I frozen foods 

8.1 coffee 

9i beer 
10 i candy and gum. 

The 10 advertisers who used the 
most spots per week in feature films 
on CBS stations ranked in this order: 
Procter & Gamble. Bristol-Myers. Lev- 
er Brothers. International Latex. 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco. War- 
ner-Lambert. Revlon. Standard 
Brands. Vick Chemical, and Colgate- 
Palmolive. 

Returning to the ratings question, 
on Friday evenings the approaching 
weekend produces a larger late eve- 
ning audience and the competition 
between Jack Paar and prominent 
feature films on other stations I re- 



gardless of affiliation 1 becomes in- j 
tensified. An ARB listing of seasonal 
ratings shows that feature films have 
the advantage on this night. In 99 
markets where Paar and late feature 
compete. ARB reports indicate ratings 
of 9.0 or over were earned by feature 
films in 42 cities. Jack Paar in only 
10 cities. There were onlv 38 mar- 
kets where features scored 6.9 or less, 
compared to 68 for Paar. 

The same Fridav night study, ana- 
lyzed bv city size, showed Paar aver- 
aging between 6.2 and 5.7 in cities of 
different size, while his principal 
movie competitors scored between 9.7 
and 7.5. In all five groups, feature 
films scored higher average ratings. 
Thev were 3.5 points higher in cities 
over two million, bv 9.7 to 6.2: 1.9 
points higher in cities of 750.000 to 
two million. 7.6 to 5.7: 2.6 points 
higher in cities from 500 to 750 thou- 
sand. 8.3 to 5.7: 3.3 points higher in 
cities of 250 to 500 thousand, 9.0 to 5.7, 
and 1.6 points higher in cities under 
250 thousand. 7.5 to 5.0. The abso- 
lute range was from 16.5 to 1.5 for i 
features and 12.2 to 1.3 for Paar. 

Which way are feature film ratings 





MOST LOCALLY 
SHCV/S OF 

ALLSANFRANCiSCO 

TV STATiONS 



And that's not all! ■ Most newscasts of all San 
Francisco TV stations ■ Only over all rating gain 
scored by a San Francisco TV station in 1959 
■ Most total advertisers of all San Francisco TV 
stations ■ Most national advertisers of all 
San Francisco TV stations ■ That's why, IN 
SAN FRANCISCO, NO SPOT |/n|y C 
TV CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE l\ I I A .£> 
WITHOUTTHEWBC STATION, SAN FRANCISCO 
Represented by Television Advertising Represent. 
% b c WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



headed — up or down? A CBS o&o 
study in its five stations of compara- 
ble March 1959 and March 1960 av- 
erages does not give a simple an- 
swer. Nielsen ratings were checked 
in Chicago, Los Angeles. Philadelphia, 
and St. Louis, and Arbitron was used 
in New York, where a new Nielsen 
service made the comparison impos- 
sible. Late movies showed changes 
of more than half a point in only two 
cities: Chicago dropped from 14.6 
to 12.4 and Philadelphia from 11.0 
to 8.5. 

These losses were offset, in part, by 
gains in the Early Show. Los An- 
geles rose from 3.1 to 6.8 and Phila- 
delphia rose from 11.3 to 12.4. St. 
Louis went from 15.5 down to 12.0. 
But neither the gain of early features 
or the loss of late features is pro- 
nounced enough to suggest national 
tendencies. ^ 



PICK-A-POP 

{Continued from page 41) 

segment on alternate weeks of Cap- 
tain Kangaroo, early mornings on 
CBS. Bagot says this is not sufficient 
frequency to challenge the three-time- 
a-week exposure he is getting locally. 
A surprising footnote to the spot 
buying by Randall & Bagot is the 
diminuitive size of the agency. Four 
people constitute the total full-time 
staff (supplemented by free lances) 
and Bagot with one hard-working sec- 
retary does the timebuying. He uses 
the phone freely to Chicago, and gen- 
erally requests certain better-rated 
parts of the shows he buys. "We were 
thinking of hiring a timebuyer," says 
Bagot. "But I wondered if it was fair 
to bring in someone for a couple of 
months on a seasonal product, then 
tell him 'go/ We don't like to staff 
up in that fashion: I'd rather work a 
few evenings myself.'" 

Asked if he'd had any problems 
with stations in establishing credit, 
the agencyman replied: "None what- 
soever." His biggest task was filling 
out a Chicago station's credit forms. 
Randall & Bagot has no other na- 
tional account, though it also i 
| handling very little local sellers. A 
I regional meat packer, a real estate 
' tract developer, and a candy company 
are among its other clients. And 
I Franwill, after this summer, is plan- 
ning to launch another confection na- 
I tionally. called Cin-Mon-Whip. ^ 



47 



As pressures from clients increase, SPONSOR ASKS: 

How high should 

k 

discounts go in tv rate 



Two tv station sales managers 
and an agency media director 
discuss the major consideration 
in formulating discount policy 



Lee Currlin, associate media director, 
Benton & Bowles, Inc., New York 
"To make allowance for exaggera- 
tion" is one of the definitions that 
Webster uses to describe the word 
discount. This definition is not in- 
tended to describe that word in the 
sense that it is used for this discus- 




sion. Nevertheless, it struck me as 
being very appropriate in describing 
many discounts as they exist today in 
the spot tv industry. 

We cannot arbitrarily decide that 
discounts should never exceed 25% 
or 30% or any other specific figure. 
The discount itself is not important — 
the net cost after applying the dis- 
count is what counts. I do feel, how- 
ever, that if a discount is too high, 
the base rate is probably too high. 
Too man) discounts are formulated 
to take care of programing areas 
lagging in sales. Unfortunately, the 
last thing station management wants 
to do is lose prestige by reducing 
rates. The convenient solution is to 
increase discounts or introduce still 
another package plan rate. Since 
every station has its own unique sales 
problems, every station has its own 
unique rate card. This rate card prob- 
lem could be greatly simplified if all 
stations adopted a single uniform dis- 
count structure and then simply ad- 
justed base rates to take care of sales 
problem areas. 

The discount problem is not one 
confined to the buyer of spot tv as 
anyone who has recently shopped for 



a major appliance can testify. Dis- 
counts, instead of being used as a 
legitimate pricing de\ ice. have been 
turned into a gimmick to create the 
impression that the buyer is receiving 
a tremendous bargain. False discount- 
ing is now so widespread that no sen- 
sible person is taken in. People do 
not buy discounts. We have been so 
confused by varying '"list" prices and 
discounts, that the only figure that 
means anything is the ultimate cost 
to the buyer. This is the price that 
people use for comparison purposes. 

Jay J. Heitin, national sales manager, 
WRCA-TV, New York 
In anv discussion of discount struc- 
tures there are two important factors 
to consider: 

1. How high should discounts climb? 

2. Under what terms are the dis- 
counts available? 

First, discounts should never exceed 
50% of the open rate. Whether you 
are selling time, space or sundries, 
any rate structure that exceeds 50% 
borders on the rediculous. When a 
particular advertising medium, for 
example, offers its wares at discounts 
that reach a point where the buyer is 
paying 30 cents on the open-rate 
dollar, followed by an additional 15' < 
deduction for agency commission, the 
medium is being offered actually for 



Discounts that 
exceed 51 1 ' < 
border on the 

ridiculous 



m 

rth of the open rate. This 




but one-fou 

-imply indicates that the original price 

is way out of line. 

But of almost equal importance in 
the setting up of a rate discount struc- 
ture is this question: Can the small 
advertiser avail himself of your dis- 
count plan? A mass medium such as 



television can prosper only by mak 
ing its product available to the largi 
number of individual clients. A 
station should keep its nest eggs ir 
many baskets. 

Here's how WRCA-TV brings 
own discount structure within read 
of the average size budget. An adver 
tiser can avail himself of the discount 
benefits by: 

1. The purchase of 14 announce 
ments of any combination. 

2. Purchase of a program I which e 
titles him to the maximum dis 
counts on all subsequent puil 
chases of spot announcements I 

3. Purchase of an AAA 10- or 2( 
second announcement. 

Thus, the end rate is available t 
the buyer of quantity announc 
ments: the buyer who wants the cd 
centrated audience delivered by 
Triple-A spot: as well as the buv^ 
who wants association and identified 
tion with a television program. 

In the interest of offering an a 
vertiser the benefits of continuity j 
the air, and encouraging such use 
television. WRCA-TV offers divider] 
in the form of added announcement 
These dividends are accrued by 
advertiser in direct proportion to 1 
use of television in the June to Se 
tember months. How are these d'v 
dends paid? In extra spot announc 
ments. 

Richard Jolliffe, general sales manag 
KTLA, Hollywood 

The question seems a bit ambig 
ous, but I'll tackle it from the po 
tion we use here at KTLA. 

Discounts here at KTLA are p| 
vided as an inducement to l>u\ dm 
time. This is a practice that pre 
ably had its birth w ith the found! 
of advertising. Where these discom 
should begin and end is a matter 
individual station policy and ecoro 
ics. Surelv we cannot go beyond t 
point of no return. Each progn 
has a cost basis which must be 
Frequently discounts are allow a| 



Al 



SPONSOR 



• 30 april m 



> bards? 



al\ within the confines of the sta- 
on's profit structure. 
Now let's delve a bit further into 
our question by asking and answer- 
lg another question. "Should a sta- 




Jon allow special discounts, over and 
ibove the rate card, to curry favor 
nd win extra business?" 

I nfortunately, there is hardly a 
jation in the country that isn't faced 
nth this problem with a fair amount 
f frequency. We have been, many 
imes! And it becomes a bitter pill to 
.wallow when we have to turn away 
dvertising dollars because a client 
Ljays he can beat the rate card at 
nother station, so why not with us? 
,;till the answer to the question posed 
lust be an emphatic no! 
It is amazing how fast the word 
ravels when a station defects to rate 
utting — and it is amazing too. 
ow quick the client involved earns 

questionable reputation and loses 
ut in other features a television sta- 
ion such as ours has to offer. 

While answering the question of 
How high should discounts in tv 
me sales go?" I brought up an 
nscrupulous approach tv manage- 
'hent often faces. I feel it only fair 
P add that stations do offer other 
matures to compensate for their re- 
jusal to allow the rate card to be 
,ushed around. Most of these induce- 
jient? center around merchandising 
,ids for advertisers. Although they 
•nvolve added expense to the televi- 
sion station, requiring trained person- 
al and a large cash outlay, these 
fringe benefits, in the long run, are 
jnuch more beneficial to the advertis- 
jr and the station than indiscriminate 
'ate cutting. ^ 



po: 



Throughout the World 

A famous name for QUALITY is 

ROCHESTER'S 

HICKEY-FREEMAN 




Hundreds of fine, hand-stitches create the smart, 
styleful lines in each Hickey-Freeman lapel. 



In the vital ROCHESTER, N. Y. area 

The QUALITY 
Radio Station is . . . 




BASIC CBS 



AM-TV 

ROCHESTER 



REPRESENTATIVES: EVERETT McKINNEY, INC. 
NEW YORK . CHICAGO . LOS ANGELES . SAN FRANCISCO 



NSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



TV VIOLENCE 

(Continued from jmge 37) 
costuming, the words in a scene. Vio- 
lence in the broad, more meaningful 
sense of the word is necessary to ma- 
ture presentation of many ideas." 

Many lay groups, such as the Na- 
tional Parent-Teacher Assn. and the 
National Assn. for Better Radio and 
Television, take sharp exception to 
this allegation. And the general pub- 
lic is inclined to join forces in blast- 
ing everything which can be construed 
as violent. 

A counter view is presented by 
Sterling Quinlan, vice president for 
ABC TV in Chicago, who says, "The 
history of the world has its share of 
violence. The winning of the West 
and the population of America by the 
white man is a story of violence, as 
is the Bible. The entire progress of 
civilization is based on violence. 

"People criticizing programing 
take the violence out of context in 
their evaluations. The agonizing scru- 
tiny brought to bear on the tv indus- 
stry has been started by people with 
good intentions, but they do not see 
the complete, over-all scheme of 
things. Nature is often violent; and 
much of life is." 



Some of the more qualitative as- 
pects of violence have been appraised 
scrupulously by a group of research- 
ers in England. In a recent book, 
"Television and the Child," by Hilde 
Himmelweit, A. N. Oppenheim, and 
Pamela Vance, an analysis of response 
to violence in British tv over a four- 
year period concludes as follows: 

"We feel that our evidence is suffi- 
cient to warrant: (1) a reduction in 
the number of crime and violence 
program shown at times when chil- 
dren are likely to view; (2) far more 
supervision of the vicious, though 
often short, episodes of violence and 
aggression in these programs, and (3) 
research, not merely into whether 
these programs really do harm — this 
we think has been sufficiently ex- 
plored — but into the more important 
question of how to devise programs 
which incorporate the successful in- 
gredients of crime, detective, and west- 
ern programs, yet present themes and 
characterizations which are morally 
and socially more worthwhile." 

The report, in general, traced more 
adverse reactions on the part of chil- 
dren from so-called regular, adult 
dramatic plays and detection themes 
than from westerns. 



The issue of program balance-! 
blending the program mix so a max 
mum audience is served with variej 
— was discussed by Frank Stanto 
CBS president, at an FCC hearii 
last January. He cited figures th 
"throw into a cocked hat the carelei 
stereotype that there are nothing b> 
mysteries, western, and gunplay" c 
tv. These three categories, he sai< 
"constitute 32.5% of the prime tin 
schedule on CBS TV and 15.4% 
its entire schedule." 

Oliver Treyz, president of ABC T 
comments that his network's "polii 
permits the inclusions of matters th| 
might relate to violence only win 
their portrayal is essential or integn 
to plot and story development." 

Regardless of the ruckus, the 
show types still attract the biggest 
audiences and probably will continl 
to for a long time. The answer raj 
be in a modification of conte 
within the shoot-'em-up frameworl 

The responsibility for reaction 
violence, particularly to that amo 
children, first rests — in the opini 
of most persons surveyed by spons 
— with the individual and, in the a 
of children, with the parents. Surv 
after survey indicates that televisi) 




SPONSOR • 30 APRIL ''0 



•nds to have an adverse effect only 
n children — perhaps some 10% of 
11 children — who bring to their tv 
iewing a neurotic personality. 
Most observers think tv — as other 
nces in a youngster's life — can ac- 
entuate the positive or the negative 
lready present in a child. Louis 
[ausman, director of the Television 
^formation Office in New York, pre- 
>nts the problem in this light: 

"It would seem unreasonable for 
ritics to characterize broadcasting as 
[•responsible, culture - destroying, 
outh-corrupting and in the next 
reath expect it to be effective in 
larif\ ing important local and na- 
onal issues. On the other hand, the 
ledium's potential can be increased 
irough thoughtful criticism based 
ji understanding." 

Q Dr. Wilbur Schramm, professor of 
Dinmunications and journalism and 
irector of the Institute for Commu- 
ication Research at Stanford U., 
alo Alto, Calif., has this to say : 
"The important effects of televi- 
on, if they can be identified at all, 
re likely to be long-range results. . . . 
elevision is only one voice, and one 
Jifluence, on children. It therefore 
eta through a whole constellation of 



other influences and these are tremen- 
dously potent. I suggest you do not 
think in terms of what television does 
to children but rather what do chil- 
dren do with television?" 

Many of the complaints about tv's 
"violence" concern implications rath- 
er than explicit occurrences. For ex- 
ample, the Rev. John Banahan, radio 
and tv director of the Archdiocese of 
Chicago, contends that "tv indicates 
a physical solution to most of life's 
problems, creating an unreal, dis- 
honest world. . . . Not all people have 
the strength of a lion or the speed of 
an antelope." 

He adds, however, "My criticism is 
absurd unless we go on the premise 
that an average of three hours per 
day is devoted to viewing (and this is 
the average for most teenagers) . For 
just one or two shows, it would be 
wrong to criticize at all." 

Rollo Hunter, vice president for tv 
and radio at Erwin Wasey, Ruthrauff 
& Ryan, New York, tries — with a bit 
of levity — to bring some of the pro 
and con arguments into focus. 

"Is there too much violence on tv? 
Yes. There is, for example, Roller 
Derby, NCAA Football, boxing, Jack 
Paar land Debbie Reynolds), the 



Three Stooges and W. C. Fields in 
The Bank Dick. A somewhat lesser 
offender is Victory at Sea. Twentieth 
Century and the 1956 political con- 
vention have also contributed to our 
storehouse of mayhem. 

"Violence is infringement, outrage, 
assault. It is on television many of 
the hours of its transmission, but it is 
not a matter of callous bounty hunt- 
ers, marshals or carbon-copy Cary 
Grants. These are soporifics, tran- 
quilizers without prescription. I 
can't honestly believe that any of 
them ever motivate the button on a 
switch blade. 

"Let's get serious with this slight- 
ly shopworn question. It is probably 
unnecessary to show a victim of the 
Mafia hung up like a beef in an ice 
box. Such stuff at 9:30 in the eve- 
ning, when 1960-style kids are surely 
watching, might better be left un- 
touchable. This is a real violence on 
tv, and a little of its goes a long way. 
On the other hand, I have seen subtle 
choreography on the lovable Dinah 
Shore family show and others with 
suggested brutality which, in its own 
way, is far more frightening than any 
funeral spray of slugs through a 
Hupmobile." ^ 




^spe//s SCUBA— short for the Self-Contained- 

Underwater-Breathing-Apparatus that has enabled 

millions to discover an exhilarating new world. 

Now tens of millions who like a story swirling 

ith action, spilling over with thrills, buoyant with 

luman spirit and peopled with characters they can 

root for will experience their own exhilaration 

when they watch this sea-fresh new show. 

Thirty-nine new half-hours, starring Bill Williams, 

swimming champion as well as movie star. Let 

SIGNMENT: UNDERWATER fly your ensign 

your own ocean! Wigwag your interest to 

i Goldman, NTA, 9570 Wilshire Boulevard, 

Hills, California, CR 4-04 1 I • A subsidiary 

of National Theatres & Television, Inc. 



30 april 1960 



Capsule case histories of success) 
local and regional radio campai§ 



RADIO RESULTS 



SEWING MACHINES 

SPONSOR: Necchi-EIna Sewing Center AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Seeking a way to increase traffic, the 
Necchi-EIna Sewing Center in Dayton. Ohio, ran a four-day 
schedule of spots on radio WING. The spots, minute an- 
nouncements, asked listeners to send in a 1946 penny for the 
opportunity of winning a new Necchi sewing machine. The 
schedule started Sunday. 3 April with five announcements 
running from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.. and four each dav following 
through Wednesday. The 17 spots, which cost under $175, 
paid back 2.644 pennies, with every penny representing a 
potential customer for Necchi. The spots were aimed direct- 
ly at the housewife and the results prove conclusively how 
effective radio is in reaching her. Three weeks before placing 
the schedule on WING, Necchi had placed a similar ad in a 
Dayton newspaper. That ad drew less than one-third as 
many responses as the WING promotion. Said Mrs. Gretchen 
W eller. manager of the Necchi Center. "I've never seen anv- 
thing like it in all my 20 vears in this kind of business." 



SPORTS EQUIPMENT 

SPONSOR: Sportsman's Store AGENCY: Dii 

Capsule case history: Sportsman's store felt that a pi 
from radio would help sales on their Picas, a muscle-bir 
ing exercise machine listed at $15.95. Although a -I 
moving item. Tom Baldridge, Sportsman's owner, felt t 
the product could be a big seller if properly promoted, 
store purchased an early morning schedule of minutes) 
WSM starting 15 February, ran two per day through 
26th. The entire 10 spots were keyed to the house* 
although the item is used by both men and women. 1 
were delivered by d.j. Don Russell, former NBC A/onj 
personality. Russell plays no rock 'n' roll on his show, ! 
tures a family kind of humor which pervades the P 
soft-sell commercials. At the completion of the camp* 
Sportsman's had sold its entire stock of Picas, and all 
were up due to the increased traffic. "This showed hie j 
radio can sell an off-beat item by building consumer intert 
savs Baldridge. "as well as move my standard merehandj 



Announcements WSM. Nashvi 



INSURANCE COMPANIES 

SPONSOR: Howard A. Pearce Assoc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Lining up good prospects is one of 
the prime concerns of any insurance salesman. Howard A. 
Pearce Associates, state of Maine agents for Mutual of 
Omaha, seeking new prospects in the latter part of last year, 
decided to try a 13-week run of schedule of one-a-day, min- 
ute announcements on WMTW-FM. The important consid- 
eration to the advertiser was the kind of audience the good 
musi, fm station promised to deliver. This audience, main- 
ly composed of well-educated, upper income families, is a 
prime insurance market. The soft-sell spots described the 
policies, asked interested parties to write the company for 
more information. The client was overwhelmed by the re- 
sponse. "The inquiries," says Duane Pearce, advertising 
manager, "were far and above the highest I've ever seen. 
By that I mean the ratio of sales as well as the income 
grouping." Enthusiastic about a future in fm. the client is 
nnw in the process of reviewing his WMTW-FM contract. 
« IITW-FM, Mi. Washington, N. H. Annoum 



TIRE CHAINS 

SPONSOR. Smith Drugs AGENCY: 

Capsule case history: The modern-day drugstore ha 
many instances, evolved into a small-scale department s 
carrying a wide range of items, from books to garden 
niture to appliances. Smith Drugs, Omaha. Neb., ha 
stock in late February a huge supply of cross link 
chains. By the end of March, hardly a chain was le 
store shelves. The big reason: a three-week radio prom 
on KOIL radio. The spots, aimed at an adult audience, 
scheduled throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and 
dav with five spots on each day for the three-week p« 
The campaign began on 1 March and continued throug 
21st. The spots were hard-hitting, direct, buy-it-nov. 
ute announcements that plugged the item and the store 
equal force. By the end of the three-week promotior. ! 
Drugs had forged out a cross link tire chain business 
totaled close to S15,000 in sales, leaving the client h 
and delighted with radio's outstanding sales achieve 
KOIL, Omaha Annou c 



52 



30 APRIL % 



WWDC RADO 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

proudly announces the addition of 

AMERICAN AIRLINES' 
"MUSIC 'TIL DAWN 

midnight to 6 AM-7 days weekly 

to its ever increasing list of 

distinguished local, regional 

and national accounts 



Represented na 



tionally 



by John Blair & Co. 



•nsor • 30 APRIL 1960 




'We Can Lick Anybody in the League!' 



the Yankees, the White Sox, the Indians . . . all the heavies in the 

American League. (Course, they lick us occasionally, too.) n BUT — 
it's the fun of the sport and the spirit it engenders that count. The 
spirit that has drawn over a million fans a year for the five seasons 

Kansas City's had the A's that's battin' .400 in any league! 

□ With Merle Harmon and Bill Grigsby again play-by-playing it for 
SCHLITZ and SKELLY, we confidently expect to lead the radio league 
again in this important heartland market, regardless of where the A's 
finish. And someday — soon? — that should be in the First Division! 

Again this year yJJ^Mi & / ^rr / bring all the A's games to the Heartland. 



k\ 



WDAF 610 RADIO • SIGNAL. HILL • KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Whafs happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



30 APRIL I960 Rep. Oren Harris and his House Legislative Oversight subcommittee are back 

in the headlines and with a bang : their chief quarry being Dick Clark. 
jblioatkhi* ma They've elected to let slide weighty legislative matters while they delve in the more sen- 

sational field of payola. 

All of which makes for an interesting contrast between the House and Senate Commerce 
Committees: one chases disc jockeys, while the other dreams of resurrecting — via tv 
— the Lincoln-Douglas style debates between two major party candidates. 

To that end Sen. John Pastore, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee's communi- 
cations subcommittee, has set 12 May as the starting date for hearings on a bill to provide 
a weekly hour of free network and station time eight weeks before elections. 

This was an indirect admission that the Senate Commerce Committee has no serious 
plans about any of the regulatory matters under consideration by the Harris com- 
mittee. Sen. Warren Magnuson, chairman of the full committee, has been threatening moves 
in that direction. However, from time to time, he has been putting off dates for such as the 
planned roundtable (planned since last December) involving broadcasting, advertising, FCC 
and FTC big- wigs) . Civil rights, too busy, were the explanations. 

However, time has now been found for the free political time bill introduced by Sens. 
Magnuson and Mike Monroney plus 20 other Senators. Monroney's rating service probe, 
regularly derailed for years, is off the track again. Nor would there be time now for any- 
thing but brief hearings on broadcasting-advertising problems such as those under the 
Harris microscope. 

Today ends the fourth month of this final session of the 86th Congress : two 
months and perhaps no more than a single additional week remains. 

The appropriations bills remain a major problem, as do such explosive issues as free 
medical care for the aged and a new farm bill. Any bills not passed by the end of May will 
be caught up in a feverish rush toward adjournment. 

All of which explains why the FCC, FTC and the industries they regulate can count each 
day which passes without restriction legislation a major victory. Already a point of 
safety from major changes in the ground rules appears to have been achieved. 



Chances for the Magnuson-Monroney political time bill don't appear in advance 
to be very good. The hearings are only beginning almost in mid-May, time is short, 
and there are thorny problems to work out. 

Even though the networks would probably agree, a law would still have to be drafted 
in such a way as to be binding. Another would be the same one which has kept the political 
equal time section of present law free from change for so long. 



The FCC has a hot potato in its lap: whether to cancel the license of WHDH- 
TV, Boston, on the grounds of bringing improper influences to bear. 

During oral argument of the case, the FCC was warned that failure to disqualify WHDH 
would make a precedent-case for the law books and law students would hereafter be 
taught that it is okay for an applicant in a contested case to let Commissioners know they 
are "fine fellows" so long as the merits of the case are not discussed. 



30 april 1960 



55 



Significant news, trends m 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



I 



FILM-SCOPE 



30 APRIL I960 

Oityrliht I960 

•PONMR 

PUBLICATION* INC. 



One of the surprises of the current syndication season has been the importance 
of automotive advertisers in certain programs. 

First, ITC's Four Just Men touched off a wave of spending by Volkswagen, Renault, 
Studebaker, and Chrysler (Mexico) . 

Now Ziv-UA's Home Run Derby is repeating the trick, with almost 30 automotive 
and related advertisers accounting for close to one-fourth of its buyers. 

This share is two to three times the one-twelfth to one-eighth share which automotive 
accounts usually represent. 

Home Run Derby automotives include dealers such as Dunn Ford in Boston, Don Allen. 
Chevrolet in Charlotte, Lark Dealers in Pittsburgh, Edwards Chevrolet in Birmingham, and 
John Barry Volkswagen in Joplin, North Platte, Little Rock, and Springfield (Mo.). 

Related automotive buyers are Midas Mufflers in Columbus (Ga.) and Super Tire Mar- 
ket in Salt Lake City. (For details, see FILM- WRAP-UP, p. 62.) 

Two factors which may explain the interest of the automotive buyers are: (1) the showV 
spring and summer schedule corresponds to the peak auto sales season, and (2) its 
reach to a masculine audience. 

Syndicators and producers are using their ingenuity to improvise program 
sources which don't involve massive production outlays. 

Two recent programs or pilots depicting the industry's caution are: 

• CNP's R.C.M.P. — for Royal Canadian Mounted Police — already showing on the CBC and 
has previously sold to the BBC and ABC (Australia). Producer is Crawley Films Ltd. 

• Termini Video Tape Services (TVT) has produced a tape pilot, Life Begins at Forty, an 
interview show which takes its star and title from Robert Peterson's syndicated newspaper 
column. 

Late night feature films haven't really suffered from the headlines which hawji 
surrounded the "live" Jack Paar competition on NBC TV this year. 

There are these aspects to the Late Movie-Jack Paar ratings battle: 

• A 25-week multi-city Arbitron, October to March, shows CBS late movies earning a 9. 
average, compared to 9.4 for Paar. 

• Paar's ratings soared three times: The two weeks he went to Hollywood, the week o 
the "W. C." incident, and the week he returned to the show; (his ratings slumped the last w< 
he was off the show). But sets-in-use shot up three of Paar's four peak weeks, showing Paai 
usually attracts a new audience and doesn't really break a viewer flow away from lat^ 
movies on these occasions. 

• In 99 markets where Paar and late movies on any other station compete, on Friday night 
feature films scored seasonal averages over 9.0 in 42 cities and Jack Paar, only 1( 
cities. 

• Here's what Paar and late movies (any station) did in ARB average of Friday nights 
city size: 

POPULATION NO. OF MARKETS 

Over 2 million 9 

750,000 - 2 million 12 

500,000 - 750,000 14 

250,000 - 500,00 30 

Under 250,000 28 

(For story on post-'48 features, see p. 42, this issue) 



JACK PAAR 


MOVIE COMPETITION 


6.2 






9.7 


5.7 






7.6 


5.7 






8.3 


5.7 






9.0 


5.9 
ue). 






7.5 


SPONSOR 


• 


30 APRIL 195 






I 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



A CBS o&o study of advertisers buying spots in Early Show and Late Show 
feature films comes up with an extraordinarily wide cross-section. 

Here's how the ten major product types rank, in terms on numbers of spots purchased 
weekly this season: 

1) laundry goods and detergents 

2) cosmetics 

3) headache remedies 

4) margarine 

5) electrical appliances 

6) personal apparel (mostly International Latex and its Maidenform products) 

7) frozen foods 

8) coffee 

9) beer 

10) candy and gum 

The top ten companies among feature film spot users on CBS stations rank in this order: 
Procter & Gamble, Bristol-Myers, Lever Brothers, International Latex, Brown & Williamson To- 
bacco, Warner-Lambert, Revlon, Standard Brands, Vick Chemical, and Colgate-Palmolive. 



F & M Schaefer (BBDO) will probably increase its schedule of Award Theatre 
feature film specials to six in each of five markets this year. 

New York, Boston, and Syracuse already have six special feature film sponsorships set; 
Philadelphia and Albany already have four through August, and additional nights are likely 
after September. 

John Nemesh, Schaefer ad manager, credited the success to "good pictures, first tv 
premiere in each market, and only four interruptions for 75-second commercials" 
during the presentations. 

Schaefer's feature film budget is an addition to its half-hour syndication schedule which 
is not being altered. 



Judging began this week for the SPONSOR-sponsored American Tv Commer- 
cials Festival as panels started to screen the 1,250 commercials received at the en- 
try deadline. 

Both film and tape commercials are being pre-screened at Westinghouse's TvAr in New 
York, which is equipped with tape facilities. 

There were over 100 entries in three categories: Commercials Classics, automotives, and 
beer & wine. 

The festival takes place 18-20 May in New York at the Hotel Roosevelt. 



Keep your eye on the midwest for a possible revival of "Chicago school" televi- 
sion through video tape in coming months. 

Graphic Pictures expects to spend half a million dollars on production facilities to build 
up Chicago as a tape and film center. 

Robert Estes, Graphic president, revealed he intends to spend $300,000 on RCA tape re- 
corders and tv cameras for a studio atop the Daily News Building. 

The Chicagoans hope to get a share of orders now habitually placed with New 
York and Hollywood producers. 



• 30 april 1960 



57 



A round-up of trod* talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



30 APRIL I960 All's not beer and skittles between the Standard Brands brass and JWT. 

Client dissatisfaction focus: the way the agency responds to the marketing problems i 
volving Tender Leaf tea. 

publications inc. As one SB ad boss put it: We ask for solutions and they come over to show us a lot 

of charts about the tea business. 



The ad director of a fairly substantial spender in tv who went shopping for 
shows to the West Coast came back empty-handed last week. 

The main reason: free-lance producers were wary to show him their ace wares because 
of his boss' tough reputation for getting into the act. 



Looks like a second switch in media directors at Lennen & Newell and both with- 
in a period of several months. 

It stems from one of those power struggles — a la BBDO — with the tv department refus- 
ing to let media infringe on its "right" to pick the network spots. 

In any event, the successor interviewing caper is on at L&N. Among those approached is. 
a print supervisor at BBDO. 



Among the things that make life both complicated and harrassing for reps : accounts is- 
suing orders for, say, 22 weeks when they have no intention of being on for more 
than half that time. 

Obvious motive behind this stratagem: get better spots. It's most frequently used in i 
sellers' market. 



There's a good likelihood that Sano (U. S. Tobacco) will pull out of all conl 
sumer advertising as a result of the FTC's taboo on references to tar and nicotine content 

In other words, it'll confine itself to medical journals. 

Another reflection of the taboo's effect: None of the new filters, like Spring, Alpin< 
Duke and Life, are showing signs of heading for the best-seller list. 



A high-rated New York radio station has gone the per inquiry route in a mod 
fied way, and for an item that costs several hundred dollars. 

The gimmick: with the per inquiry value set at $7.50, if the station fails to get enoug 
returns to cover the campaign's card rate the station will rebate the difference. Bi 

the station collects S7.50 each for inquiries that exceed the time costs. 

Incidentally, the manufacturer makes a $4.50 profit on each inquiry by charging his frai 
chised dealers $12 for each one he turns over to them. 



The effort to lend dignity to the generic word for the fellow who chatters b« i 
tween phonograph records has lately been stepped up because of the Washingto" i 
probes. 

Obviously, for want of a more catching name, more and more stations are having the I 
disk jockeys refer to themselves on the air as "musicasters." 



30 APRIL 19M 



On The Gulf Coast 



fHE BIG ONE 



U 




Takes The Measure 



•JW 



WKRGTV 

CHANNEL 5 MOBILE. ALA. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Representative, 

or C. P. Persons, Jr., General Manager 



U>NSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



59 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



AGREED— A hearty handshake between Herbert P. Buetow (I), president of Minnesota Mining 
& Manufacturing Co., and Robert F. Hurleigh, president of the Mutual Broadcasting System. 
Action took place just prior to the public announcement that the 3M Co. had purchased Mutual 



wests' ■*& 








-\. i\Ammm 




91 - 4$ * 


\- m^^M^I 


■mm 


Wk v 




f >S 


JJM 




^^H 




km 









TRANSFER of ownership of WDAF, Kansas City, from National Theaters and Television, Inc. 
to Transcontinent Television Corp. is past talking stage. Making final arrangements: David 
C. Moore (r), pres., TTC, B. Gerald Cantor, pres., NTT. Transfer is subject to FCC approval 




ADVERTISERS 



With its half-hour buv on limit 
66 (CBS TV) this week. Chevro 
let will have two weekly hours o 
network tv going for it in the fall 

Ford is now set with an hour and , 
half and it looks like it'll add a hall 
hour to come up to parity with Che* 
rolet. 

Time and program billings for tb 
three Chevrolet shows, assuming the 
stay on 52 weeks, add up to arounj 
•821 million. 

Campaigns: 

• Standard Oil Co. of Califoi 

nia last week began a major radj 
and tv spot campaign for its ne 
gasoline antiknock compound. Meth\ 
The tv spots are scheduled in 25 r 
kets to supplement the Companvi 
regular weekly Sea Hunt series, 
radio. Standard is using a heavy t 
campaign in 22 markets besides i 
early evening Chevron Headlin 
!\ews on ABC. Methyl 
promoted on Standard Farm Repof 
er on KGO. San Francisco: KFR 
Fresno, and KFI. Los Angeles. 



AWARD OF ACHIEVEMENT, presented 
the Advertising Club of Washington, 
to John W. Kluge (second I), pres. and cna 
man of board of Metropolitan Broadcast! 
Corp. Also present ( I to r) : Mark Evans, Ml 
v.p., Mrs. Kluge, John Panagos, club prj 



.[, 




WINNERS of first annual award for 
Ohio-prepared reg. radio commercials. ' 
ing (I to r): S. Buchanan, McCann-Mars 
D. Jones, Ohio Bell; F. Kolb, Standar, 
of Ohio; G. Wilson, McCann-Mars 
Seated: D. Marcus, Marcus Adv.; L. 
bach, Ohio Sta. Reps; M. Wyse, Wyse 



91 



k,*4fed 






• Tidewater Oil Co. is re-enter- 
the college sports-sponsorship 
Id. To date, the Company has 
de arrangements to sponsor foot- 
11 and basketball at USC over 
>X. Los Angeles: LCLA over 
IPC. Los Angeles: California, over 
FO. San Francisco: and Stanford. 
■ KCBS. San Francisco. Also in- 
ded in the Tidewater sports pack- 
j is sponsorship of the NCAA Re- 
gnal basketball and the AAWU 
ck finals in San Francisco next 
Agencv : Foote. Cone & Beldins. 



• Foil jumped into the top 
sition in ARB's March tally of 
? Best-Liked Tv Commercials. 

This marks the first time in 10 con- 
utive months that Hamm's has not 
the survey. It appeared in the 
mber two spot for the month. In 
:rd place was General Electric, mak- 
its first appearance in the top 
•ee since the survey began. 
The runners-up. in order: L&M. 

tl Soap. Seven I p. Burgermeister. 
d. Piels. and Post Cereals. 



Strictly personnel : Frank Jones. 

to corporate director of public rela- 
tions for Bell & Howell Co. . . . Joel 
Kibbee. to manager of customer edu- 
cational services of the Remington 
Rand Lnivac Division of Sperry 
Rand . . . Ted Kaufman, to direc- 
tor of advertising, sales promotion, 
and publicity for the coordinated 
Youthcraft Creation-Corde De Paris 
Co. 



AGENCIES 



Two points were made during a 
panel at the 4 A"s Boca Raton 
meeting last week which may be 
well worth pondering by admen 
and people in tv. 

The topic: Are the people brighter 
than we think? 

Noted William A. Lyngate, of 
Earl Newsom \ Co.: the hard, blat- 
ant sell doesn't take into account the 
educational revolution that's taken 
place since the 1930s when only four 
million had a college education: to- 
dav it's 18 million. 



Observed Elmer Roper: stand- 
ards of morality and taste have to be 
higher on tv because of its status: it 
would get a worse judgment than 
newspapers if it adopted the same 
standards as the daily press. 

Agency appointments: Colgate's 

Cashmere Bouquet soap, transferred 
from D'Arcy to Norman. Craig & 
Kummel . . . Lanvin Parfums. New 
1 ork importers of Arpege and other 
perfumes, to North Advertising . . . 
The Greater Atlantic Rambler Dealers 
Association, to Geyer. Morey. Mad- 
den & Ballard . . . Holidav Inns of 
America, motor hotel-restaurant or- 
ganization, to D. P. Brother & Co. 
. . . The Carpet Fair. Inc.. with plans 
for a radio and tv campaign, to Al- 
lenger Advertising. Brookline. 
Ma—. . . . Certified Grocers of Illinois. 
Inc.. for its Raggedv Ann Foods Di- 
vision, with a spot tv campaign in the 
Mid-West planned, to Tobias. O"- 
Neil & Gallay. Chicago . . . Armour 
Industrial Chemical Co.. to the Buch- 
en Co., Chicago . . . The Puritan 
Chemical Corp.. for its radio and tv 



8 


m 


\\ \L 



"SKETBALL BREAKS — •'Scooter" Sea- 
-! /es CI hasn't got a chance against "Texas" 
•ver, as she outreaches him between games 
Ml recent double-header. Public Service 
y >t. of WAKC, Tulsa, sponsored the benefit 



»NSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



HAWAII moved to Park Avenue in New York City for a party in honor of Kini Popo's returr 
to KGMB, Hawaii. Refreshments and entertainment from the island were featured. Party-goen 
(I to r): Jack Thompson, PGW; Sally Reynolds, Lennen & Newell; H. Preston Peters, PGW 
Bob Carpenter, J. Walter Thompson; Bob Teter, PGW, and Dorothy Medani, J.Walt, 








TIDE'S 10TH— This luncheon 
celebrated decade of tv in 
Tidewater Virginia. WTAR-TV, 
Norfolk, played host, accept- 
ed award for jest local, state 
and news coverage from AP's 
Frank Fuller. Sig Mickelson, 
ores., CBS News, was keynoter 



advertising, to Joe Gans & Co., New 

^ urk . . . The Kansas City division of 
Safewaj Stores. Inc.. with planned ex- 
tensive schedules on i\. am, and fm 
throughout the Missouri and Kansas 
areas, to Bozell & Jacobs, Kansas 
City. 

Thisa V data: JWT will transfer 
its Consumer Purchase Panel to the 
Market Research Corp. in the middle 
of the year . . . New quarters: Mil- 
burn McCarty Associates has 
opened a Chicago office at 46 East 
Superior Street, headed by Donald 
Young . . . Kudos: Frances Ken- 
nedy, v.p. in charge of copy at D-F-S, 
Chicago, named "Advertising Woman 
of the Year" by the Women's Ad- 
vertising Cluh of Chicago. 

New offieers of the 4 A's: Chair- 
man, Harry Harding, executi\e v.p. 
of Y&R; vice chairman. Edwin Cox, 
chairman of K&E; and secretary- 
treasurer, Arthur Rippey, manag- 
ing partner of Rippey, Henderson, 
Bucknum & Co., Denver. 

They were named v.p.'s: John 
Strouse, at B&B . . . Richard Cob- 
lens and Richard Neely, at BBDO 
. . . Maitland Jones, at Kastor Hil- 
ton Chesley Clifford & Atherton . . . 
George Roberts Jr. and Gilbert 
Headley, at Y&R . . . Leonard 
Avery, Eh-. Leslie Beldo, Donald 
Grawert, William Barber, Harry 
Deines, and Robert Nevin, at 
Campbell-Mithun . . . Thomas Blee, 
at Bonsib, Inc., Ft. Wayne . . . Joseph 
Davis Jr., at the newly-opened Los 
Angeles office of Robert C. Durham 
Associates . . . Robert Whiting, at 
the Chicago office of Y&R . . . Harry 
Kinzie Jr., at Needham, Louis & 
Brorby, Inc. 

Admen on the move — continued: 
John Schroeder, to associate media 
director at Wade Advertising . . . Dr. 
Ho Sheng Sun, to associate research 
director at Gordon Best Co. . . . Roy 
Williams, to account executive for 
Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago . . . 
William Rose, Robert Crawford, 
Mitchell Cohan, and Sean Casse- 
dy, to the creative staff of Comstock 
& Co., Buffalo . . . H. Robert Barr, 
to research director at Frederick E. 
Baker & Associates, Seattle . . . Terry 
Burnside and Joseph Del Papa, 
copywriters at Foote, Cone & Belding, 



Chicago . . . Charles Beam, to 

account executive at Allen & Reynolds, 



"This is no time to cry the blues," 
stated ITC president Walter 
Kingsley this week in an interpre- 
tation of a first quarter report 
intended to pierce the gloom 
which pessimistic remarks have 
encouraged. 

Kingsley made several significant 
points: 

• He acknowledged that the film 
industry is going through a period 
of great change. 

• He highlighted the need to re- 
duce overhead and to consolidate 
departments for efficiency. 

Kingsley also noted ITC's growth, 
grossing $800,000 more in the first 
quarter of 1960 than last year. 

Sales: Food Fair Stores will co- 
sponsor NTA's Play of the Week on 
WPST, Miami . . . ABC Film's The 
Peoples Choice sold to KCPX-TV, 
Salt Lake City; KVKM, Monahans; 
WCYB-TV. Bristol: WTVH, Peoria; 
KFDX-TV, Wichita Falls; WTIC-TV, 
Hartford ; KELP-TV, El Paso ; KPHO- 
TV. Phoenix; KGHL-TV. Billings; 
WDBO-TV, Orlando, and WCPO-f V. 
Cincinnati . . . CNP's Pony Express 
now reportedly in 87 markets, sold to 
WWJ-TV, Detroit; WLWI-TV. India- 
napolis; WMAR-TV. Baltimore; 
WGN-TV. Chicago; WKBW-TV, Buf- 
falo; KTVU, San Fransicso; KTTV, 
Los Angeles; KPRC-TV. Houston; 
WTOC-TV. Savannah, and KTVI. St. 



More sales: Ziv-UA's Home Run 
Derby to Household Finance of Holy- 
oke and Seymour Ice Cream (Copley 
Adv.) on WHDH-TV. Boston; Seven 
Up Bottling on KPLR-TV, St. Louis; 
Neal Tyler — Schlitz (Seitzer Assoc.) 
in Jacksonville; Riverside Hotel on 
KOVR-TV. Stockton; Johnson & 
Johnson on WBTW, Florence; Pla- 
teau Electric Cooperative. Appalach- 
ian Cooperative, Fort Loudon Elec- 
tric Cooperative and Holston Electric 
Cooperative in Knoxville; LaBatt 
Ltd. (Ellis Adv.) on WKBK-TV, De- 
troit: Consolidated Cigar (EWRR) 
on WDSM-TV, Duluth; Wilson Furni- 
ture on KEY-T, Santa Barbara; 
American Block Co., on WHIS-TV, 



Bluefield. and WCTV, Tallakasg 
. . . Home Run Derby statio 
for automotive advertisers iS 
FILM-SCOPE i are WHDH-TV, B< 
ton; WTVM, Columbus; KSL-T 
Salt Lake Citv : WSOC-TV. Charlott 
KODE-TV, Joplin; KNOP-TV, Nob 
Platte; KATV, Little Rock; KYT 
Springfield; WAPI-TV. Birminaha 
and KDKA-TV. Pittsburgh. 

Diversification: Allied Artists ft 

moved into informational and coj 
mercial film production in Holly woe 
Jack L. Copeland is executive pj 
ducer in charge of this new unit a 
its Eastern representative in \ 
York is Rov M. Brewer. 

Strictly personnel: Jerry Frank 

named executive director of adver 
ing, publicity and promotion for 1 
tional Theaters and Television . 
Albert G. Hartigan named progq 
development director of UAA . i 
William J. Connelly is Northd 
tral area manager of Screen G 
syndication . . . C. P. (Pete) Ji 
er becomes executive v.p. and Si 
uel F. Rubin becomes chairman; 
the board of Flamingo Films 
Milton H. Greene through his i 
pany provide Filmsways exclu 
services in the tv commercials fiel< 
a photographer . . . Grace V. Si 
van named national sales directo 
Official Films . . . Bob Goldston 
comes assistant to the chairman ol 
board of NTA and at the same 1 
assistant secretarv of NTA and Kl 



NETWORKS 



Gross time billings for th< 
networks in February reveal 
interesting changes in ratios 

(1) The ratio of weekday i 
pared to the vear before dro 
from 30 r « to 2V< : (2) ABC ' 
share of the total billings went : 
20% to 23',. 

The grand tally for Februari 
compiled by LNA-BAR for TvB: | 
598.975. an increase of 13.7 
the like month of 1959. 

Grosses and plusses by netwB 
ABC TV. S12.677.110. 26.5'; . N 
TV, s22.998.153. 10.5', ; \"B 
$19,923,712, 10.4%. 

ABC TV is apparently plain! 
to lay a lot of emphasis onj 
gional sales. 



62 



• 30 APRU I 



It's just put out a compilation of 
igional distribution patterns for 

er two score smaller advertisers. 

The data are based on Media Rec- 
jds for newspapers and Rorabaugh 

sports for spot tv. 

'8S president Frank Stanton 
cused on the most important 
id single problem broadcasters 
id editors have in common — 
eedom of access to informa- 
>n — in a speech before the Ameri 
ll'n Society of Newspaper Editors in 
Washington last week. 
I Stanton called journalism "half- 
>e and half-slave. It is free to give 
I t information ; it is not free to take 
information." Because of this, 
; asked that newspapers and broad- 
rating make a joint effort of dis- 
cing to the people the secrecy in 
! government and the whole area 
w the fight for information on gov- 
iment activities. 

iC board chairman Robert 
< 'irnoff last week announced a 
! w debate-policy that will be 
•fered presidential nominees be- 
i aning eight weeks before elee- 
' »n day. 

■ 'To make these appearances possible 
f thout penalty of giving equal time 
I the numerous minor party candi- 
I tes. NBC will invite the two major 
'it'ididates to appear on Meet The 
• ess. During this period, the pro- 
mt will be expanded to a full hour 
. 1 rescheduled on Saturday evenings 
place of World Wide 60. 

JC TV is trying to educate the 
I wspaper columnists and critics 
•, the nuances of rating services. 

[t | £ ,iThe network this week is mailing 

4. the press a three-page memo defin- 

; what a rating is and explaining 

ifc various systems and techniques 

(r Ij'd by each of the services. 

fci're are the estimated expendi- 
<res of the top 10 network com- 
ny advertisers, followed by 
and advertisers, during Janu- 

•v. as compiled by LNA-BAR and 
eased by TvB : 

GROSS TIME 
*K COMPANY COSTS 

I P&G $3,652,264 

J ! American Home 2,853,609 

,. ' | Lever _ 2,458,332 

General Motors 2,137,010 



5. Colgate 2,086,665 

6. General Foods 1,777,778 

7. Sterling 1,322,687 

8. Liggett & Myers 1,274,524 

9. R.J.Reynolds 1,244,960 

10. Gillette _ 1,209,715 

GROSS TIME 
RANK BRAND COSTS 

1. Anacin $910,403 

2. Dristan 909,639 

3. Phillies 872,789 

4. L&M 626,084 

5. Winston 555,666 

6. Bayer 550,670 

7. Colgate 542,516 

8. Gillette 536.503 

9. Pall Mall 527,239 

10. Chesterfield 519,053 

Network tv sales and renewals: 

Candid Camera, to be a regular half- 
hour series on Sundays, 10 p.m. on 
CBS TV beginning October for Bris- 
tol-Myers (Y&R) and Lever (JWT) 
. . . R. J. Reynolds (Esty) renewed 
its sponsorship of Wagon Train on 
NBC TV for next season . . . Alberto- 
Culver (Geoffrey Wade) for the 
Barbara Stanwyck Theater series on 
NBC TV Monday, 10-10:30 p.m. be- 
ginning in the Fall . . . Humble Oil 
& Refining Co. (Mc-E) and Liggett 
& Myers (DFS) have joined Gil- 
lette (Maxon) as sponsors of the 
NCAA football coverage on ABC TV 
. . . The Chevy Suspense Show joins 
NBC TV's Summer lineup replacing 
the Dinah Shore Sunday feature, for 
Chevrolet (Campbell-Eward) . . . 
Midas Mufflers (Edward H. Weiss) 
will sponsor The Derby Preview, a 
special 15-minute program before the 
Kentucky Derby coverage on CBS TV 
next Saturday (7 May). The Jos. 
Schlitz Brewing Co. (JWT) will be 



half-sponsor of the Derby telecast on 
CBS TV. 

Financial report : Estimated net op- 
erating earnings of AB-PT for the 
first quarter of 1960 were the highest 
in the company's history — $3,336 mil- 
lion, up 44% over $2,313 million dur- 
ing the like quarter of 1959. 

New affiliates: KICO, Calexico, 
Cal.; WPOM, Pompano Beach, Fla.; 
and WBAT, Marion, Ind., to ABC 
Radio. 

Thisa 'n' data: CBS last week pre- 
sented a financial grant to the New 
York Philharmonic in support of 
a seven-week, 26-city tour scheduled 
through August and September . . . 
The Wizard of Oz motion picture will 
be telecast as a two-hour special on 
CBS TV Sunday, 11 December, for 
Benrus Watch Co. (Grey) and 
Stephen F. Whitman & Son 
(Ayer) . . . Gunsmoke enters its ninth 
year of broadcast on CBS Radio 
this week. 

Network personnel notes: Oliver 
Treyz, president of ABC TV, has 
been nominated for director of AB- 
PT .. . Hugh Graham, to director, 
live operations, CBS TV . . . Philip 
Luttinger, to assistant director of 
research for CBS TV . . . Louis Rig- 
gio, to director of sales development 
for CBS Radio. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The switch this week of WLS, 
Chicago, from regional and farm 
programing to a greater empha- 



TV NEWS from M&A AUXANDCR! 



THE V. I. P. PACKAGE OFFERS: 

AVA GARDNER 
MICKEY ROONEY • TERRY MOORE 

and over 50 more great Hollywood names 
to attract the highest TV ratings! 



Call, Write or wire . . . 

M&A ALEXANDER PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



BMJSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 



sis on the metropolitan audience, 

i- the most recent and possibly most 
important of similar changes by such 
powerful farm radio voices as WKV 
Oklahoma City, and WOW, Omaha. 
The WLS switch is brought on 1>\ 
\l'>< ownership. 

RAB's latest pocket-size presen- 
tation, aimed at bread adver- 
tisers, calls radio's virtual blanket 
coverage of housewives one of 
the "five big reasons" why their 
advertising should be mostly ra- 
dio. 

States the presentation: "Women 
make the brand decisions on bread. 
\lmost 969? °f young housewives 
listen each week and they average two 
hours and 26 minutes daily. Work- 
ing housewives average one hour and 
59 minutes daily and 94.5% listen 
each week." 

Ideas at work : 

• "Sing the Thing:" Some one- 
half million contest phone calls were 
made to WIL, St. Louis, during the 
station's recent two week sing-the-sta- 
tion-I.D. -promotion. The idea: a bank 
of telephone lines were installed at the 
station and listeners were invited, via 
several weeks of teaser spots, to call 
the numbers and record their voices. 
Station then aired these recorded 
phrases, five each half hour, and 
awarded prizes to listeners recogniz- 
ing their vocal interpretations and 
telephoning the station within a given 
time limit. 

• Easter promotions, contin- 
ued : WING, Dayton, ran a "Loonev 
Lid" contest for Easter. The idea: 
Listeners were asked to create orig- 
inal hats with the winner to receive 
a $25 nift certificate for a new cha- 



peau. The promotion, aired for five 
days, received a response of close to 
I nil outlandish creations. The win- 
ning hat had a live baby chick in a 
cage with a stuffed cat reaching into 



New quarters : WLBZ. Bangor. Me., 
this week transfers its operations 
from its 30-year home on Main 
Street to its new radio building on 
Outer Broadway. 

New fmer: WBAL-FM. Baltimore, 
began operations last week with dedi- 
cation ceremonies that took place in 
the newlv-constructed fm studios in 
the WBAL building. 

Sports note: Union Oil Co. of Cali- 
fornia and the Rambler Dealers of 
the Greater Portland and Southwest 
Washington area have purchased the 
entire 150 game schedule of the Port- 
land Beavers baseball games on 
KPOJ. Portland. All adjacent news- 
casts have been sold to the Pepsi Cola 
Bottling Co. and the OK Tire Stores. 

Radio station acquisitions: 

KLOU, Lake Charles. La., to Albert 
Johnson, former manager of KEXS- 
AM-TV. San Antonio, for 8150.000, 
brokered bv Hamilton-Landis & Asso- 
ciates . . . KUKO, Post. Tex., to 
Galen Gilbert, owner of KTLQ. Tahle- 
quah. Okla.. for S50.000, brokered by 
Hamilton-Landis & Associates . . . 
KLGA. Algona. Iowa, to Barry 
Snyder, Robert Behling. and Robert 
Wilson, for 880.000. brokered by 
Hamilton-Landis & Associates. 

From buyers to sellers: The sale 
of WCME. Brunswick. Me., to Roger 
Strawbrid«e and William McKeen 



New, exciting- *4§! 

music 




has been approved by the FCC. Thl 
new owners were formerly account m 
ecutives with O'Rvan & Batchelder. . 

Thisa 'n' data: To celebrate its 38l 
anniversary. WSB. Atlanta, alom 
with Jo\ Motors, is sponsoring a coil 
test to determine how far a Renaui 
will go on one gallon of gasoline . I 
Unusual business note: KCOl 
Santa Maria. Cal.. recently sold a 9? 
year commercial contract t 
Weatherby's Home Furnishings se\ei 
store chain in Southern and Centq 
California. 

Kudos: To WBEL. Beloit, WisJ I 

Milwaukee Braves Broadcast Awai 
for the best promotion in 1959 . \ 
To KOOL, Inc., Phoenix, the 51 
cial Plaque Award from th^ Arizo* 
Education Association for publ 
service programing in the field 
public education ... To Martr 
Crane, director of women's pd 
grams at WLS. Chicago, the ""Gold* 
Mike" award f rora McC all's magaziij 

Station staffers: Joseph MeMj 
ray, to general manager of KOR 
Las Vegas . . . Eddie Clark, to s 
tion manager and program direct 
of KBKC. Kansas City . W. 

Massie. to station manager 
WDAK. Columbus. Ga. . . /rial] 
De Toledano, to direct the \^ a 
ington news bureau of the Taft Br.Jc 
casting Co. . . . Ray Bluestein., 
station manager for KBL Z. Pho< 



REPRESENTATIVE 



PGW has a novel radio sales 
proach available in its New \ c 
office, dubbed "Phone-A-Checl 

Here's how it works: Timebuy 
are invited to judge the sounds 
PG\^ stations for themselves bv A 
ing the special Phone-A-Check nil 
ber and asking to hear a parti' \\ 
one. 

Buvers can then listen on tli 
phones, to as much as 15-minut-*sjB 
the on-the-air approach and pc 
alities of the station via a spec. a 
produced composite tape featurj 
the music policies, news coveraj 
service, and the like of each atal 

The opening - of - rep - offices - • I 
Minneapolis trend, begun in ia** 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL lfl 



I by Katz and Branham. may soon 
followed by another: H-R is eye- 
the Minneapolis market in seri- 
; consideration of opening an of- 
'. there in the very near future. 

p appointments: To Richard 
Connell, WKIZ. Kev West, Fla. 
To Walker-Rawalt, WINF, 

irtford-Manchester. Conn. ... To 
nard. Rintoul & McConnell, 

R\. San Jose, Cal. Torbet, Al- 
i & Crane will represent the sta- 
V on the West Coast ... To Hil F. 
st Co.. WIOS. Tawas City, Mich.: 
X)G. Marine City, Mich.: WNKY. 
on. Ky.; WBGN. Bowling Green. 
.: WBBT. Lyons, Ga. : WPTX. Lex- 
Jon Park. Md.; KORC. Mineral 
■lis. Tex.: WCXY. Cannonsburg. 

: WEZN, Elizabethtown. Pa.: 
.EM. Emporium. Pa.: and WKMC. 
faring Spring, Pa. 

tisa "n* data: Broadcast Time 

les is inaugurating a series of 
:dnesday night cocktail parties for 
lebuyers in its New T York pent- 

«ise offices . . . New quarters: The 
anta office of The Katz Agency 
ves to 1393 Peachtree Street. 



TV STATIONS 



"DAF-TV-AM, Kansas City, has 
> anged hands again : from Na- 
Imal Theaters & TV, Inc., to 
I -anscontinent TV. 

Price: SO. 75 million. 

IB's board of directors set a 
ial of S3-hillion in tv revenues 

the end of 1964 double the 

"•59 total. 

1 Doubling tv revenues within five 
'ars involves the medium increasing 
share of total advertising from the 
■', of 1959 to 19 r ; by 1964. in ad- 
ion to the anticipated growth of 
advertising. 

The Board set this goal at a meet- 
: in Boca Raton. Fla., in conjunc- 
n with the 1960 annual meeting of 

• 4 A's. 

»me industry expenditures on 
during 1959, as reported by 
B: 

• Confectionery companies in 

'59 used tv as the leading national 
jvertising medium. Gross time bill- 
ga were S26.201.966 — an in- 



crease of 23.6' r over the $21,191,973 
for 1958. Of the total, national and 
regional spot tv gross time billings ac- 
counted for SI 3,427,000. The top 10 
advertisers, in order: Beech Nut-Life 
Savers, American Chicle, Wm. Wrig- 
ley Jr., Food Manufacturers, Sweets 
Co. of America, Mars, Peter Paul, 
Hollywood Brands, New r England 
Confectionery, and Chunky Choco- 
late. 

• Pet food tv advertising gross 
time billings in 1959 were $14,395,- 
339, an increase of 23.49r over 
SI 1.665.699 spent in 1958. Spot tv 
accounted for $6,689,000. Here are 
the top 10 leading brands for '59, 
with their total tv gross time billings: 

1. Purina Dog Chow $2,549,948 

2. Gaines Dog Meal 2,283.430 

3. Surechamp Dog Food 1.026.056 

4. Ken L Dog Food 999^206 

5. Rival Pet Food 819,320 

6. Kasco 638,480 

7. Dash Dog Food 607,065 

8. Sergeant Pet Care 550.736 

9. Pard Dog Food 520.400 
10. Hunt Club Dog Food 469,220 

Report on color tv: RCA plans 
to double its color tv production 

capacity due to the greatest quarterly 
upturn in the six-year history of color 
tv receivers. 

RCA's 1960 color progress report 
shows first-quarter color tv set 
sales were up more than 40% 
over the same period of 1959. 

Ideas at work : 

• Gold rush days are here 
again: To commemorate the 71st 
anniversary of the first Oklahoma 
land rush. KTUL-TV, Tulsa, staged 
an "89er Treasure Rush" last week- 
end. The ideas: viewers were asked to 
visit any of the several local establish- 
ments for free passes and treasure 
maps to participate in the big "Treas- 
ure Rush" on Lookout Mountain. Sta- 
tion began the weekend festivities 
with a parade in downtown Tulsa 
featuring tv stars, stage coaches, old 
and new fire engines, square dance 
wagons, covered wagons, and the like. 
Busses took the people participating 
to the proper location. Along with 
the "rush," fiddler's contests, square 
dances, and kiddie rides were fea- 
tured. Prizes were awarded to the 
best 89er costumes. 

• And so are the Vikings: To 
announce its forthcoming Tales of 



the Vikings series, WROC-TV, 
Rochester, sent a model dressed in 
authentic Viking garb to visit the 
area's agencies delivering parchment 
scrolls tied with a leather thong in- 
viting them to attend an ox roast. 

• Promoting brotherhood: 
WHEN-TV's (Syracuse) Magic Toy 
Shop kiddie program has "adopted" 
a 6-year old Korean girl through the 
Fosten Parents Plan. The idea: sta- 
tion is encouraging youngsters to 
write to their new "sister." Along 
with this, the show w ill feature songs, 
games and stories that Korean chil- 
dren know. WHEN-TV personnel 
have contributed clothes and money 
to be used as additional aid for the 
Korean family. 

New quarters: WTIC-AM-FM-TV, 

Hartford. Conn., this week begins 
construction on its Broadcast House, 
with completion of the building ex- 
pected in January of '61. Its loca- 
tion: the northwest corner of State 
and Front streets. 

Kudos: Three Crosley Broadcast- 
ing tv stations (WLW-T, Cincin- 
nati: WLW-I. Indianapolis; and 
WLW-A, Atlanta), and WLW radio 

are among the winners of the 1959 
Public Interest Awards of the Nation- 
al Safety Council . . . Glenn Ryle, of 
WKRC-TV, Cincinati. awarded for 
his outstanding service to raise funds 
by the National Foundation for the 
March of Dimes . . . KABC-TV, Los 
Angeles, has received a special com- 
mendation by the Commandant of the 
U. S. Marine Corps for its special 
Toys for Tots show last Christmas . . . 
KPIX, San Francisco and KDKA- 
TV, Pittsburgh, recipients of the 
1959 Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 
"Lamp of Knowledge" award for 
public service and educational pro- 
graming . . . WTMJ-AM-TV, Mil- 
waukee, winners of the 1959 Milwau- 
kee Press Club awards. 

On the personnel front: Walde- 
mar Erickson, named farm director 
of the radio & tv division of Triangle 
Publications . . . Tony Padre-, to 
assistant local sales manaser of 
KFMB-TV. San Diego . . . Frank 
Young, to assistant director of pub- 
licitv and special events of Metropoli- 
tan Broadcasting Corp . . . R. Doug- 
las McLartv. to production manager 
of WRCV-TV. Philadelphia. ^ 



30 april 1960 



65 



'91V 



MA 



Lfl 



RJ 



station 
to the 
central 
south 



John P. Taylor has been appointed man- 
ager of marketing administration. Broad- 
cast and Tv Equipment Division. RCA. 
The four divisions, w ith their managers, he 
will be responsibe for. are advertising 
and promotion. P. A. Greenmeyer: market 
research and product planning, E. F. Cold- 
well: customer relations, E. T. Griffith; 
and sales administration, with a manager 
still to be selected. Prior to his new appointment, Taylor was mana- 
ger of marketing plans for RCA"s Industrial Electronic Products. 




\n a\ ahead with the news. 
W L A< :-TV won 4 out of 5 
re, .-ent lop news awards. 




While serving a single 
station market, WTHI-TV 
fulfills its public service re- 
sponsibilities in a way that 
has gained for it the appre- 
ciation and support of its 
entire viewing area ... a cir- 
cumstance that must be re- 
flected in audience response 
to advertising carried. 

Five full % hours of local 
public service program- 
ming each week. 



WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 CBS • ABC 

TERRE HAUTE 



Mai Klein, v. p. and general manager of 
WNTA, New York, joins KHJ-TV. Los 
Angeles this week in the same capacity. 
Prior to his W NTA position. Klein served 
as assistant general sales manager of 
KABC-TY. Los Angeles. He was also an 
account executive with that station. Pre- 
viouslv. he was with KLAC-T\ (now 
KCOP.i, Los Angeles. Klein was gradu- 
ated from the L.C.L.A. School of Business Administration and i 
addition he did post-graduate work at the University of Denvei 





manager. KMEO was aul 



Jack L. Katz has been named general 
manager of KMEO, Omaha. A native 
Omahan. Katz began his broadcasting ca- 
reer with KMTV. Omaha. He was with this 
station for seven years, serving as film di- 
rector, film buver, and account executi\''. 
A year ago. Katz organized KQAL-FM. 3 
good music outlet in Omaha, and served as 
president-general manager. His interest in 
% ith Bill Dunbar, Katz" partner, as general 
thorized 1 Januarv as a good music ootlefl 



Albert R. Whitman has been named 
president of Campbell-Mithun. He started 
his agency career as an office boy at Ben- 
ton i> Bowles, where he later rose to the 
post of v.p. After a stint with the U. S. 
Government. Whitman returned to B&B as 
director of sales promotion and merchan- 
dising and account supervisor. In 1950 
he joined C-M as exec v.p. Ray Mithun is 
the new board chairman for the agency. Under the new set-up whilj 
man is chief operating officer and Mithun chief executive officer. 



*M 



SPONSOR • 30 APRIL 196 



THIS CAPTIVE AUDIENCE 
IS TRYING TO REACH YOU! 



s*i 



tw 




Help forge the only link with freedom 

that 76 million satellite captives have— 

support Radio Free Europe 



Leaders of the broadcasting industry — men 
like Goldenson, McGannon, Sarnoff and 
Stanton— are today urging you to help tell the 
truth to the audience that needs it most. Use 
your programs, your voice to back up your 
Radio Free Europe colleagues. Seldom has 
American broadcasting had such an opportu- 
nity to help sustain//-^ broadcasting through- 
out the world. Your RFE kit contains all the 
radio and television materials you need to do 
a complete job. 

What Radio Free Europe is 

RFE is a privately supported network of 28 
transmitter and relay stations broadcasting to 



76 million captive peoples in Poland, Hungary, 
Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Romania. It is 
on the air up to 18 hours a day reaching this 
vital, truth-hungry audience. 

Why RFE is important 

Without broadcasts like those of RFE, the cap- 
tive peoples of satellite countries would never 
know the truth about the outside world. It 
gives moral sustenance to those nations which 
have traditionally loved freedom. During the 
Special Campaign period, April 24 — May 8, 
please give Radio Free Europe your all-out 
personal support. 



Broadcasters for Radio Free Europe 



PONSOR • 30 APRIL 1960 




SPONSOR 
^ SPEAKS 

Let's accentuate the positive 

Last week, in an unusually thoughtful and provocative 
speech before the Arizona Broadcasters Association, Richard 
S. Salant of CBS, called on the industry to "eliminate the 
negatives and accentuate the positives" of the broadcasting 
business. 

Others have said this before but Salant's reasons go deep 
to the heart of the matter. He says: 

"We must accentuate the positive, not just as a defense 
against our critics, but as a means of coming to grips our- 
selves with the fundamental questions which, in the early 
stages of broadcasting some of us had tended to neglect — the 
fundamental questions of who we are, what we are, what is 
the real nature of broadcasting and its relationship and obli- 
gations to the public, and, conversely, what is the real nature 
of the American public and its obligations and relation to 
the broadcasters. 

"What are the premises of broadcasting in our society, and 
what are its promises? What are we doing in this business 
anyhow, and how good a job are we doing? 

"Only when we address ourselves to these questions, and 
begin to make progress in finding the right answers, can we 
begin to rest comfortably about the chances of solving the 
fundamental problem and averting the great danger which all 
of us, both public and broadcaster, face today: the problem 
and danger arising from the fact that there are some influen- 
tial, intelligent, thoughtful and articulate people who would 
not have you, or the public, or us in broadcasting answer 
those questions for ourselves. 

"They would take the power to answer away from us and 
vest it in their own hands, or in the hands of a chosen few of 
their friends. And they would impose their answers on all 
of us." 

We think that Salant has stated the problem, the danger, 
and the challenge as succinctly as it has ever been expressed. 
We wholly agree with his conclusions. 

THIS we fight FOR: Re-examination by 
all broadcasters, as proposed at the NAB 
convention, of all of the industry's business 
practices, and housecleaning where necessary. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Huh? Looking up a phone numbe 
in the Manhattan directory, a sponsoi 
staffer ran across this firm name list 
ing : "Legs — Legs — Legs, 769 3rd . . 
PL 5-2168." 

Top pops: For April Fool's Dajj 
Phil Stone, CHLM, Toronto, conj 
piled a list kidding the "top 50" turn 
Some of his hits — 
Title 

Tall Oak Tree Rin Tin Til 

Theme from "A Thummer 

Plathe" The Lithpertl 

Everything's Coming Up 

Rose's Antony Armstrong- Jon^ 

I Love The Way You 

Leave Jack Pa* 

Why Do I Love You 

Sew? ..Singer Sewing Machine C 
Big Iron ..Ching Fov's Hand Launch 

Build My Gallows High Tall Paj 

It Could Happen to You The Raq 

In the can: Will the success of T{ 
Untouchables result in the usual ra' 
of imitators? If so, here are sod 
suggested program titles: The Toucl 
ables. The Unreachables, The Reac\ 
ables, The Unfixables, The Fixalh 
— Frank Hughes 

Poli-tickles: From NBC release 
anecdotes of the past that highli: 
the upcoming political conventions;! 
"Senator John F. Kennedy was ;ji 
the bathtub in his hotel room when tj 
heard the news that he was gettij 
votes for nomination as Vice Pi 
dent in the 1956 Democratic Conv 
tion. 'He came out to the televi: 
set with a towel wrapped around Y 
self to watch and see what happen 
says NBC News commentator Da 
Brinkley. 'By the time he got him 
dried off. Kefauver had beaten him 
Tell us another bathtime story. 

Tycoon: Then there was the r 
Texan who wrote a check and 
bank bounced. 

The promoters: Watch for the p 
licitv campaign to celebrate Natic 
Pickle Week from 19 to 28 May. 
National Pickle Packers Assoc 
readying "the Pickle Party, to < 
vert consumer interest in the Pi 
dential election into extra pi< 
sales." Oh, they're the tricky oi 
those pickle packers. 

SPONSOR • 30 APRIL L 



tV J-Jxjl U "" X V sells to one of the richest farm areas 
in the country . . . where more than % million cows 

create a constant demand for drugs, machinery, 
equipment, buildings and farmers to keep 

Wisconsin's largest industry growing. 




EAU CLAIRE 

See your Hollingbery man in Minneapolis, see BILL HURLEY 




TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 



^C Most Recent Pulse and Hooper 
Represented nationally by G.LL-PERNA . New YorK. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, D«fl 
CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS WALT, Tampa . . .. WPEN, Philadelphia ... WSAI. One 




SPONSOR 



IE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 







ted Miss TillieVision I960 

fs our Trade Mark — the gal who's got everything! 



1. Channel 2 for extra counties. 

2. CBS for best Public Service. 

3. 400,000 TV homes for greener pa 



1 A| 



;EN BAY, 



WISCONSIN 




■■ 



NETWORK TV: 
THE BETS 
ARE NOW DOWN 

With the schedule at 
nighttime firm, clients 
are putting chips on 
westerns and comedies 

Page 33 

What's behind 
radio's 'good 
music' boom? 

Page 36 

'What I expect 
from my agency 
media people' 

Page 41 

How fm keeps 
Hamilton 
Watch ticking 

Page 43 




the 

QUALITY 

touch 



The spectacular shot is not always the bread 
and butter shot. It's that ability to sink putts 
consistently inside 6 or 8 feet which sepa- 
rates the pros from the amateurs. And so it 
is in business, too. The real pay-off comes 
when television and radio stations also 
possess that "quality touch". . . a touch which 
is evident in day in and day out practices so 
vital in producing a winner. May we put this 
winner to work for you? 

Represented by 

LEdward ij'etry & , Co.. Inc.. 

The Original Station Representative 




TELEVISION abc 
RADIO abe/nbe • DALLAS 

Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH n 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING (^ 



THE RAILTON SPECIAL 
IS THE 

PACESETTER 

IN AUTOMOBILES 

It hit an incredible speed of 415 miles per hour 





IS CINCINNATI'S 

PACESETTER 

RADIO STATION 

WSAI is the only radio station in 
Cincinnati offering a merchandising plan 
through supermarkets. Our exclusive tie- 
up with A & P stores offers you extra sales 
promotion . . . guaranteed in-store 
displays for your client's products. In Pro- 
gramming ... In Popularity ... In Produc- 
tivity . . . WSAI is Cincinnati's PACESETTER 
radio station 



Represented Nationally by GILL-PERNA New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 
THE CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS ViSM-Cincinnati; ViPlM-Philadclphia; WALT-Tampa 



ONSOR • 7 MAY 1960 



WSIX TV 

Tops Them All In 
The Nashville Area 

LEADING IN . . . 

6 out of TOP 
*10 

out of TOP 

SHOWS 



t WSlXsELLS WITH TOWER HEIGHT 

2049 ft. above sea level . . . none taller 
permitted in this area by CAA. 

t WSlXsELLS WITH POWER 

316,000 powerful watts . . . 
maximum — permitted by FCC. 

' WSlX SELLS WITH EFFICIENCY 

Maximum coverage and low cost per 
thousand make WSIX-TV your most 
efficient buy in the rich Middle Tennessee, 
Southern Kentucky, Northern Alabama 
TVA area. 



(X) 



CHECK THESE 
FACTS: 



(X) TV Homes — 370,700 
(X) Population — 1,965,500 
(X) Effective 'Buying Income — 

$2,155,868,000 
(X) Retail Sales — 

$1,585,308,000 




E I ol. 14. No. 19 • 7 MAY I960 

SPONSOR 

■ THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS US t 



m 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Net tv: the bets are now placed 

33 With the net- in virtual control of shows, fall scheduling is a three/ 
way checker game, with sponsors at tableside betting chips on the move 

Behind radio's 'good music' boom 

36 The number of "good music" radio stations is growing with change i 
public tastes. Stations are programing more scientifically, cohesive! 

Commercials festival to hear FTC chief 

38 Earl Kintner, FTC chairman, will be guest speaker 18 May at the Roose 
velt Hotel in N.Y. for the first luncheon of the Tv Commercials Festivj 

Tea spending on video is up 7.2% 

40 Gross time billings for tea hit $7,970,260 last year, according to Tv] 
figures just out. Coffee at $34,972,868; grand total: $1,232,914.53 

'What I expect from agency media people' 

4X Dick Paige? media manager for Colgate-Palmolive's household product 
outlines what he expects from media planners in his five ad agenci* 

Fm keeps Hamilton ticking 

43 First of a two-part series, this sponsor case history of watchmakers o 
radio is devoted to examining Hamilton's quality sell, $150,000 fm budgi 

How occupation affects viewing 

45 Sindlinger report on Monday p.m. audience shows clerical, sales, c 

men, watch more than farmers, unemployed, domestics. Also: Tv Ba-i< 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

68 Film-Scope 

30 49th & Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
60 Picture Wrap-Up 
26 Reps at Work 
84 Seller's Viewpoint 



52 Sponsor Asks 

70 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

86 Sponsor Speaks 

58 Spot Buys 

56 Telepulse 

86 Ten-Second Spots 

82 Tv and Radio Newsmaker! 

67 Washington Week 



BBEI 



Executive, Editorial, Circulation l 

: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: Mir 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingh 
Office: Town House. Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sis 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 
Md. Subscriptions: U S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries 5 9 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Ad< | 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., " * 
by SPONSOR Publicatio 



©I960 Sponsor Publications In 



OR THE MANUFACTURER 
WHO HAS EVERYTHING! 

(Well, Almost Everything!!) 

He's the manufacturer with a good product, good pack- 
age and good distribution set-up. What more could 
he want? MORE SALES, of course! 

If you happen to be in his position in Central Iowa, 
WHO-TV can help you reach and sell more people, 
at low cost. 

The popular Early Show (4 p.m.-6:05 p.m. Monday 
through Friday) is a good example. It starts with a 
fast-paced cartoon segment* for kiddies, then features 
a full-length movie* for mom, and signs off with news 
for dad . . . gives you an average of 67,515 viewers 
per quarter hour, at only $1.18 per thousand! 

Results? You bet — plenty of them! And this is only 
one of many outstanding values on WHO-TV, every 
day of the week. Ask PGW for availabilities. 



*MGM Package ir WARNER BROTHERS "Vanguard" 
if "Showcase Package" if NTA "Dream," "Champagne," 
"Lion" * SCREEN GEMS "Sweet 65" • HOLLYWOOD 
TELEVISION SERVICE "Constellation" * M and A ALEX- 
ANDER "Imperial Prestige" * PARAMOUNT LIBRARY 
and others. 



NSI SURVEY 

DES MOINES-AMES AREA 



EARLY SHOW - 


- TOTAL AUDIENCE PER QUARTER 


HOUR 




No 


/ember, 1959 


February, 1960 


Percent 


VIEWERS 


54,832 


67,515 


19% 


HOMES 


27,410 


32,150 


23% 



WHO-TV is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company, 

which also owns and operates 

WHO Radio, Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 

«0-TV 
O-TV 
O-TV 
lO-TV 




WHO-TV 

Channel 13 • Des Moines 

NBC Affiliate 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., National Representatives 



wmca 



PRO. I- 1 1.IZi! 




■ it Steve Labunski hasn't heard about 
it by the end of a business day it never 
happened or it's not worth repeating. His 
friends claim he's ubiquitous. The simple 
truth is, WMCA's general manager has 
been around. ■ He was a U. S. Military 
Intelligence interpreter, a political col- 
umnist for the Kansas City Daily Record, 
1948 Democratic candidate for the Mis- 
souri State Legislature and Congressional 
Assistant to Representative Richard 
Boiling (D. -Mo. (.■Why then radio-and 
not the caucus room? Perhaps the thought 
of Edmund Burke, who in 1769 said, 
"There is ... a limit at which forebear- 
ance ceases to be a virtue." As general 
manager of WDGY in Minneapolis, Di- 
rector of Operations for Crowell-Collier 
and vice-president of the American 
Broadcasting Company. Steve Labunski 
was anything but virtuous. As vice-presi- 
dent and general manager of WMCA. 
New York's leading independent station. 
SBL is relentless. And for such single- 
mindedness of purpose he is well-beloved 
by his colleagues, his wife Betty, 10 year 
old Linda, Richard, 8 and Roger, 5. But 
like the lemming, makes his meek mi- 
gration to and from White Plains. 



A &. M Radio Sail 



Jack Masla &. Co.. 



wmca 



&rpi 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Alan Courtney's promotion into the specially created post o 
MBC TV program administration v. p. offers the unusua 
instance of a career man, 13 years with MBC, who work® 
his way up through the ranks and is still highly regarded i 
agency circles as one of the bright, rising young men in tt 



The newsmaker: Alan D. Courtney, whose 13-year caret' 
at NBC was capped this, week by his promotion into a post specia 
created for him. namely, v. p. of program administration for NBC T\j 

Mr. Courtney's advance in rank gives him administrative contrt 
of the NBC program department, including special and daytime jj 
well as nighttime programs. 

It is as no stranger to either nighttime or daytime programs thi 
Mr. Courtney assumes his new post. Last April he became v.p. 
nighttime programs. It was in 
September. 1957. that he became 
nighttime programs director. 

Five years ago this month. Mr. 
Courtney was named sales and pro- 
graming administrator of NBC 
TV's Today, Home, and Tonight 
groups, and he later became ad- 
ministrator for all the network's 
participating programs. 

In July. 1956. he became exec- 
utive producer of the Steve Allen 
Show, a position he held until Sep- 
tember of the following year. 

Mr. Courtney first joined NBC in Los Angeles in March. 1 ( > 
He transferred to the station relations department i 
October, 1952. 

Before joining NBC in 1947. Mr. Courtney was general manaj 
of the Metropolitan Theatres in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Courtney's promotion was announced at the same time as I 
promotions of two other NBC TV program executives, who 
report to him. Robert F. Aaron has been named director of H 
time programs, and Jose ph P. Cunneff becomes director of nightti 
programs. Richard L. Linkroum, special programs v.p.. will a 
report to Mr. Courtney. 

A native of San Francisco, Mr. Courtney attended Princeton. 
University of Southern California and the University of Califo' 
at Los Angeles. He lives in Scarsdale. N. Y.. with his wife and IV 
two sons. 







LARGEST SHARE 
OF AUDIENCE* 
>F ALL BALTIMORE 
TV STATIONS 



SPOT-BUYING FACTS NOT ON THE RATE CARD ABOUT WJZ-TV BALTIMORE 



And that's not all ! 

■ Highest rated local live shows of all Baltimore TV stations. 

■ Most newscasts of any Baltimore TV station. 

■ Only Baltimore station that editorializes on community problems. 
That's why, in Baltimore, no spot TV campaign is complete 
without the WBC station \AAJZ-TV 13 

*Balt. ARB Reports, Nov. 1958-Mar. 1960 BALTIMORE 



WJZ-TV Baltimore represented by Televi 



1 Advertising Representatives, Inc. 



®(h)© WESTINGHOUSE broadcasting company, inc. js£ 




SPONSOR 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 



Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Milcsch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 



Film Editor* 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Seff 
Llovd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 



Production Editor 

Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMEN1 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 



Eastern Office 

Bernard Piatt 
Willard Dougherty 



Western Manager 

George Dietrich 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTME* 

Allen M. Greenberg, Manager 
Bill Oefelein 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publis 1 < 
Laura Oken, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Coope:; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Guttman; Wi k 

Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Flora Tomade i 
Phyllis Waldbrand 




Psstl...Gdl Hollipi<jbel\j 



for a Sure Winner in the 



"^ Sure, most of us know there's no such thing as a 
"sure thing." But radio's leading handicappers . . . 
The Pulse and Hooper . . . have rated WVLK FIRST 
since 1952. Backing any other entry in this market 
is strictly a long-shot. 

HE HORTON-KINCAID STATIONS Home offIce : t °p ; of +he Phoenix Ho+el ' 

Lexington, Kentucky 





Radio 1290 

_J i -J — J — 

WVLK ' 

LEXINGTON W H EE L ING- B E L LAI R 



WFKY WCMl 

FRANKFORT ASHLAND- HUNTINGTON 



'ONSOR • 7 MAY 1960 



"SUNNY" is the 

2 



ADULT 

WESTERN 

STATION* 




The Western Coast of Florida, 
that is ! If you're shootin' for 
adults in this territory, better 
hire the top gun . . . WSUN! 
"Sunny" is No. 1 in adult lis- 
tener ship, per 100 homes, 
throughout the entire 2-t hour 
broadcast day ! And Pardner, 
WSUN delivers these adults at 
the lowest CPM, between 6 a.m. 
and 6 p.m., of any station in 
the heart of Florida!** 

*Pulse, ll-'59 
**SRDS 1'60 






Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep: JAMES S. AYERS 



by John E. McMilii: 

Commercial 
commentary 



P & G's Bill Ramsey retires 

To the youngsters and upstarts of our business 
the news that William M. Ramsey, long-time 
chief of Procter and Gamble's radio activities, 
retired last month after 31 years of Cincinnati 
service may mean very little. 

If you have come into the industry since 
World War II (and. as Clair McCollough noted 
recently, most of you have) you probably won't 
remember that P&G once bestrode network radio like a Colossus, 
that Bill Ramsey was once the Mr. Radio of the advertising businta 

But those of us who worked with him during the exciting 193C 
and early 1940's know all about Bill's contributions. And his retii 
ment now. at age 60. has set many of us thinking long, deep thougl 
about time and change and certain losses broadcasting has suffere 

Bill. I believe, was the most extraordinary client radio ever 1 

P&G, even 20 vears ago, was a companv largely dedicated to t! 
slide rule and sharp pencil — to a meticulous examination of ratiq 
and budgets and cost-per-1,000 and brand development figures ai 
painstaking advertising research. 

But Bill Ramsey , presiding over P&G's radio empire and respon! 
ble for more than 100 programs a week, was not that kind of guy. 

He was, of course, a P&G man — first, last, and always. But I 
particular genius and the qualities he brought to radio were not the 
you ordinarily associate with the Cincinnati giant. 

Ma Perkins and 'Clair de Lune' 

Nor, I think, would you ever spot Bill as the master Midwe 
showman who put together the greatest collection of high-rated da 
time serials ever heard on the air — Ma Perkins, Life Can Be Beau 
ful, Against the Storm, Pepper Young, Vic and Sade, and mai 
many others. 

This quiet, conservative Yale man, who wore his Brooks Brotlie 
clothes with the casual untidiness that marked him as Ivy Leag 
long before the phrase was even invented, was no extroverted adv 
cate of corn and cliff-hanging. 

A devotee of operas and symphonies, he was happiest, I thii 
when he could sit at a piano playing Debussy's "Clair de Lune' 
a Chopin nocturne, while a cocktail party swirled around him. 

When he came to New York, as he did several times a month 
invariably attended the theater, and some of my brightest Broad v 
memories are of shows we saw together. I remember particul u 
how thrilled we both were with Thornton Wilder's "Our Town." 

He was fastidious in his manners, his language, even his f< c 
He and I often had lunch at the English Grill in Rockefeller CerU 
and Bill made a little humorous ritual of ordering nothing 
oysters, soup, toasted English muffins and two dry martinis. 
{Please turn to page 14 1 



MAY I) 



General Electric eliminates possible "blind spots" in their national television message by adver- 
tising G.E. Bulbs with spot campaigns in SELECTED markets. The fabulously funny Mr. Magoo 
— featuring the voice of Jim Backus — is the pleasantest TV ad treatment to come along in 
many a year. Here's an example of how SPOT has gone big time. Successful advertisers like 
G.E. know the power of spots well-placed — know how to capitalize on the unrivalled selectivity, 
exclusivity and productivity of Spot TV. 



Television, Inc. 
Representatives 



MY DEAR, 

YOU'RE 
RAVISHING 



YOU 
KCANT 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 



KCEN-TV 




M. P.! 

also stands for military 
pay roll ... the buying 
power of 6 Central 
Texas bases zero-ed 
in on our call signal. 



J! j, 

CHANNEL <fe 



■ 



Commercial commentary {continued) 



In his dealings with the P&G agencies — Compton, Pedlar & R\an. 
Kastor, Blackett, Sample & Hummert — he was always gentlemanly 
soft-spoken, considerate, never the heavy-handed autocrat that nl 
and P&G's position might have made him. 

\et — and this is the paradox — quiet, sensitive, esthetic Bill Rai 
se\ gave his company greater dominance in a major mass mediunj 
than P&G or any other advertiser has known before or since. 

Look up the facts for yourself. By 1940 P&G's night and daytitm 
programs reached far more people far more often than those of am 
other sponsor. P&G's share of the nation's radio listening 
greater than any share of tv viewing or magazine or newspapei 
readership that any company has ever achieved. And Bill was lame 
ly responsible. 

Dear friends and gentle hearts 

His secret, the reason for his extraordinary influence, was soind 
thing that is all too often forgotten amid the huge budgets, thj 
frenzied research, the production complexities, and the fractionate; 
marketing problems of modern broadcast advertising. 

Bill Ramsey knew, liked, understood, and genuinely respected th) 
people who worked on P&G programs. 

He had no false pride, no cheap, pseudo-intellectual scorn for wh^ 
others tagged as "soap operas." 

He recognized that Paul Rhymer brought to J ic and Sade flasliej 
of w it and humor to compare with the best in American literature. 

He applauded outstanding performances wherever he found thei 
— Virginia Paine on Ma Perkins, Anne Seymour on Mary Marlii 
Mercedes McCambridge on Guiding Light. 

He could talk sympathetically with Carl Bixby and Don Becktj 
about their creative struggles in turning out 260 episodes a year t 
Life Can Be Beautiful, and with Elaine Carrington about Peppi 
Young. 

He understood the importance of little things in dealing with tj 
ent — why Gertrude Berg was so touched and delighted when P& 
decided not to insist on a "morals clause" in her Goldbergs contrat 

He understood temperament, too. When Irna Philips, who wrl 
Guiding Light, Road to Life, and Right to Happiness, demandi 
that P&G and its agencies give her a car to celebrate her 10th anr 
versary in radio. Bill did not explode over the unreasonableness 
the request. 

Instead, he chuckled and quietly arranged for himself, Greg W 
liamson of P&R. and me to deliver a shiny new Chevrolet convertil 
to Irna at the Edgewater Beach Hotel. 

Inevitably, of course, the picture changed. Tv came in. Rad 
programing and listening underwent violent upheavals. P&G gra 
uallj withdrew in favor of the video medium. 

Bill, himself, never made the changeover. And I suppose tl 
sometimes now he looks back on his career and wonders about it i 

If he does, I hope he realizes this: that in a bitter, fiercely co 
petitive marketplace, he proved again the ancient virtues. 

He proved, in his own lifetime, that nothing unlocks the gates 
creativity like love and understanding, that warmth and heart i 
sensitivity are the strongest forces in human relationships. 

Knowing this should make Bill very proud and very huir 
too. 



7 may 191 



How the television receiver works, 

including a gratuitous comment about evolution 



Electronic bumps run down a flat lead-in 
made of two parallel wires, after having 
been plucked from thin air by the business 
end (not to be confused with the editorial, 
or reflector, end) of a prehensile antenna 
finger generally wrapped around a chimney. 
In strong signal areas the bumps crawl thru 
the walls and the finger may be dispensed 
with. 

The tuner ("front end" to us an couran- 
teurs) accepts the hash of plucked signals. 
selects a channel with the help of a person 
("human being"), who applies a kind of 
discriminator}- judgment that makes it all 
worth while ( in Eastern Iowa at least) . The 
tuner's larynx makes smorgasbord out of 
the hash, selecting and amplifying the pic- 
ture and sound seeds which come wrapped 
in the same bump, or hull. The tuner IFs 
the RF into the IF and video amplifiers. 

A video detector (not to be confused 
with Mike Hammer) detects the video and 
separates the men from the boys and the 
picture from the sounds. The men are 
shunted to ground, the picture bumps go 
into more video amplifiers (the picture 
bump getting bigger and bigger), the bovs 
and the sound bumps go thru the audio 
section where the frequency-modulated 
signal bump is amplified, demodulated, de- 
boyed, amplified, and engaged to be mar- 
ried, after which it goes into the loud 
speaker and there you are. 

Back to the video bump. The AGC cir- 
cuit and assorted video amplifiers send the 
picture seeds on to the CRT (not to be 
confused with the IRT, or you'll end up in 
Far Rockaway), where it gets synced. 
swept (sweeped?), high voltaged. voked. 
scanned, and investigated by the ASPCA. 

Various controls are scattered around the 
outside of a set. These knobs, screws and 
dinguses are there for one purpose: twist- 



ing. Without them a reasonablv curious set 
owner would have to resort to baton twirl- 
ing when a picture started rolling, which 
would be bad for the psyche and the furni- 
ture. 

Well, that's about it. In Eastern Iowa, 
evolution may be observed at work: Be- 
cause WMT-TV (Channel 2) (CBS tele- 
vision for Eastern Iowa) is number one in 
share of audience in all time periods from 
9 a.m. until sign-off Sunday thru Saturday 
(no matter what survey service you sub- 
scribe to), most channel selectors of the 
front ends of sets in the area have atrophied. 
The Katz Agency, our national reps, has 
additional anthropological and technical 
data. 




h'ONSOR • 7 may 1960 



ONE THING IS CLEAR. 



KNXT is first in Los Angeles / See any of the past 61 consecutive Nielsens. Or just 
take a good look at these figures from the latest (March) report: 

In a seven-station market, CBS Owned KNXT commands a 29% share of tote 1 
' ""diences ... a new high for the season . That's a sturdy 38% more than the secoiiu 
omnuii, 53% more than the third . Also, 14 of the top 25 nighttime shows, 12 of the 
top 15 daytime shows are on KNXT. 

To KNXT's clearcut numerical leadership, add a superior commerciaJ climate , 
too. When, for example, 600 Southern Calif ornians were asked (hy the Institute for 
Motivational Research) to name the station "most likely" to carry advertising for 
a "progressive and research-minded company, which devotes quite a hit of effort 

- *he public of new and improved products,"^"'" 
ozy© mure inun named the runner-up station, 46% more than numeu aw rcuiu 
five Los Angeles television stations combined. 

Easy to see why farsighted advertisers, with an eye to profits in the nation's 
second market, continue to sell their products on the number one station. 
CBS Owned • Channel 2, Los Angeles • Represented hy CB& Television Spot Sales 



P 

T O 2 

LI CI 



• • * ♦ « 



KNXT IS FIRST 



IN LOS ANGELES 



PREFABRICATED MATERIALS for Uncle Sam in Panama^ 
from the market on the move TAMPA- ST.PETERSBURG 




Typical of mushrooming industry in the Tampa 
Bay area is Florida Builders, Inc. — St. Petersburg, 
Florida. Expanding into the international field, 
this company is now engaged in constructing 330 
Capehart military housing units for the U.S. Army 
Engineer Corps in the Panama Canal Zone. 

Reminder: This rich, healthy market is dominated 
by WTVT, the station on the move— your most 
profitable buy in the entire Southeast. 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

45.6%... Latest ARB 9:00 A.M.-Midr 
CHECK THE TOP 50 SHOWS! 
ARB NIELSEN 

WTVT 38 WTVT 



34 



Static 
Static 



B 12 



station on the move 



WTVT 



® 



Channel 

13 

TAMPA -ST. PETERSBURG 

Oklahoma City • Represented by the Katz Agency 



JAY 19 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



7 MAY I960 



UBLICATI0N8 INC. 



There's another side to those complaints of dictatorial charges that important 
advertisers and agencies have been levelling at the tv networks the past month. 

And that is the blaze of antagonism would have happened even if the Washington scandals 
hadn't cleared the way for the networks to assign themselves greater control over programing. 

It all developed out of an evolutionary process. As the cost of tv went up network 
advertisers moved more and more away from exclusive sponsoring of a program and sought to 
spread the risk via alternate week and participation. They also put greater and greater 
emphasis on circulation and less on identification with the quality of a program. 

Hence, as the networks now point out, what could they do but get into step with their 
customers and adapt themselves to an expansion of the magazine concept? 

The networks also raise this question : outside four or five agencies how many of 
them have executives capable of turning up shows that can make the network grade? 

Comes the retort from veteran admen: If the networks want to control their schedules in 
the full sense of the word, then they must assume full responsibility for producing cir- 
culation and provide the advertiser with reasonable escape hatches. 



Stations that aren't on the list might be interested in knowing Lambert & Feasley is 
buying that spot radio campaign for Phillips 66 by process of pre-selection. 
In other words, the stations are picked without counter-bidding. 
There'll be about 20 spots a week during traffic hours and weekends. 



Radio reps took a swipe at McCann-Erickson this week for permitting itself to 
be a party to a country-wide effort by Lehn & Fink to induce stations to accept L&F 
business at other than national card rate. 

The reproach was incorporated in an SRA letter urging its members to alert their stations 
against the practices of a so-called consultant who specializes in making special deals 
for national accounts. The consultant's compensation : a commission on the money he 
saves an advertiser as against the card rate. 

According to the SRA's letter, though this traveling agent is under Lehn & Fink's direc- 
tion, McCann-Erickson, as agency of record, is having his deals billed through it. 

The same operator, say the reps, formerly functioned for Mrs. Wagner's Pies. 



Only spot tv buys of major dimensions the past week came from Melnor lawn sprin- 
klers I Smith/Greenland) : $300,000 in 42 U.S. and Canadian markets, six-eight weeks. 

The action in radio was somewhat stronger. The accounts included: Accent ( NL&B i : 
Perk Up Starch (Gourfain Loeff) ; Myzon (HH&McD) ; Milbrook Baking (McCann-E). 



BBDO this week finally resolved its problem of finding a media director: Her- 
bert D. Maneloveg was moved up to that spot from the ranks of associate media directors. 

Maneloveg's appointment came five months after Fred Barrett, his predecessor, retired 
from the agency. In the interim the BBDO management had discussed the job with sev- 
eral high-rated media executives outside the organization. 

Maneloveg joined BBDO in 1954, coming from Benton & Bowles. 



• 7 MAY 1960 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



B&B apparently isn't getting an overwhelmingly favorable response to its dor 
ble query to tv stations: whether they'd accept a two-minute P&G commercial and whs 
would he the rate. 

The reaction among reps, as found by SPONSOR-SCOPE, was pretty well divic 

ed. Some thought it would complicate commercial-length problems with advertisers less skille 
than P&G, while others said they'd be willing to go along with the track record in good tasl 
and judgment of an agency like B&B. 

Some stations, it appears, want to see the commercial, involving a new food prcx 
uct which requires a substantial amount of demonstration, before they commit themselves t 
an acceptance. 

The almost complete obliteration of the franchise concept from network tv ma 
work to the favor of spot. 

As pointed out to SPONSOR-SCOPE by a major rep this week, the only place left i 
the medium where an advertiser can develop a franchise is spot: he can keep sweete 
ing his list and nobody can knock him out — as has happened this year especially at CBS T 



You can expect more periodic spot blitzes to emanate from coffee advertise; 

because the ability of the national brand to hold its share of the market is getting incres 
ingly precarious. 

The competitive pressure heightens from two sides: the regional distributor ai 
private brands (the chains and the co-ops). 

And now the midwest coffee companies are joining the parade of product < 
versification: like, for example, Butter-Nut I Tatham-Laird I and North Woods (C.E.Frank 

Butter-Nut's move into the instant tea market is. obviously a natural, but North Wood 
new baby is a freeze-at-home confection, Pop-Ice. The former is testing in a few m? 
kets this month and the other will try early morning network tv in the summer. 



Despite the way things have been going for the medium this year, SUA figures 1 
gross billings for national spot radio this initial quarter will be just about what! 
was for the like period of 1959. 

The SRA's estimate for the first three months of last year came to 840,655,000, which n 
6.3% under 1958. 



Detroit's largess for netw T ork tv the coming season will be shared more evei 
than the season before : NBC TV will get less than 55% of the total, in terms of ti 
and talent costs, whereas it garnered over 70% in the 1959-60 cycle. 

Here's an allocation of Detroit money by network (either already committed or about 
be committed) for the year ahead: 

ADVERTISER 

Buick 

Chevrolet 

Chrysler Inst. 

Dodge 

Ford line 

Lincoln-Mercury Div. 

Plymouth 

Pontiac 

IMC-A/C Spark Plu< 

Total 



ABC TV 

$5,700,000 


CBS TV 

SI, 500,000 
6,200,000 


NBC TV 

S 3,800,000 

13,900,000 

800,000 

15,600,000 
6,900,000 

1,700,000 

§42,700,000 

SPONSOR 


TOT -J 1 

S 5,300,( 
25,800,( 
800,( 
3,700,( 
15,600,( 
8,400,( 
4,800,( 
4,200,< 
4,600,< 
§73,200,0 

• 7 MAY 1! 


3.700,000 


1.500,000 
4,800,000 
1.700,000 

815,700,000 


800,000 

4,600,000 

$14,800,000 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Even P&G has to face today's hard reality: it has to waive control over a show it 
brought into a network when the network underwrites the alternate week. 

It's happened in the case of The Law and Mr. Jones, despite the fact that Cincinnati 
fought bitterly against yielding the licensee rights to ABC TV. 

ABC's position: we cannot be responsible for the alternate week unless we have 
a contractual link with the show's producer. 

Adding to P&G's sense of loss: there's nothing to prevent ABC from moving the show to 
any spot it wills and P&G is stopped from moving the series to another network. 

Schlitz will again look to some network weekly sports series for its main tv pro- 
motion next season. 

In picking up half of the three Triple Crown Races on CBS TV it contracted to pay $225,- 
000 for the package. However, there's a most-favored-nation clause. If the other half is 
sold for less the brewer benefits. 

NBC TV daytime continues to wean 'em away from the spot camp: the latest 
two being Plough Chemical and Knox Gelatine. 

Plough is spending about $100,000 on serials this summer, while Knox has commit- 
ted itself for around $300,000 on an alternate quarter-hour of Loretta Young. (The 
week before Jergens, a habitual spot user, put $175,000 into NBC daytime.) 

NBC's coup of the week, however, was pulling one out of the ABC TV column — 
Armour. The deal was for three quarter-hours a week and could amount to $2 million annually. 

From present indications the five leading cigarette companies will have a total of 
56 commercial minutes running per week this fall on the three tv networks at night. 

That, of course, will be only part of their spending, as most of them are regular spon- 
sors of sports events. 

Compute those 56 commercial minutes at an average cost of $34,000 per minute for time 
and talent and you get a billings tally of $19 million a week. Over the season it would 
figure in the neighborhood of $95 million. 

The boxscore per commercial minute per week for each cigarette advertiser as it appears 
at the moment: 



ADVERTISER 


ABC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC TV 


TOTAL 


R. J. Reynolds 


6 


6 


iy 2 


13i/ 2 


Brown & Williamson 


7 


4 l/ 2 





11% 


Liggett & Myers 


m 


3 





ioy 2 


American Tobacco 





3 


7 


10 


Lorillard 





3 


4 y 2 


iy-i 


Philip Morris 





3 





3 


Total 


20i/ 2 


221/, 


13 


56 



Campbell Soup (BBDO) will be going into daytime spot tv in the next fiscal year 

in addition to continuing with the two tv network half-hours (Lassie and Donna Reed), spot ra- 
dio and network radio. 

The expenditure for spot tv will run around $650,000 as compared to a million 
for spot radio. 

Imagine a network charging $200,000 for the rights and only $9,000 for the 
time! 

That's the deal for the sponsorship of the 20 June Johanasson-Patterson fight on ABC Ra- 
dio. Bristol-Myers has bought half of this $209,000 package. 

Incidentally, Humbel Oil (McCann-E) has picked up the open fourth of the NCAA foot- 
ball games on the same network. Package price for the quarter: $1.4 million. 

• 7 may 1960 21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Lever Bros, is in the midst of one of its periodic in-depth projections of hot 
network and spot tv. 

How Lever determines where the medium is headed the next 5-10 years: it allocates prol 
lems to its various agencies on specific facets of the business and from the data thus eo 
lected a hlueprint is evolved. 

The odds against BBDO's getting a favorable reaction to its feeler to tv station 
ahout lower summer rates looked quite heavy this week. 

A check by SPONSOR-SCOPE of important reps showed a lack of enthusiasm toward tl 
intent of the inquiry. 

One rep wrote its stations that if the implication was that the rates at present were n< 
right for summer then maybe the prices were too cheap for winter. 

Another rep post-scripted his station memo on the matter with this comment : "It seem 
more than a coincidence that BBDO just got the Pepsi-Cola account." 

NL&B acquisition of the Rival Packing account added to Chicago's position a 
the pet food advertising capital of the world. 

Eight such accounts are being serviced now out of Chicago, practically all of the 
heavy spenders in spot tv. 

Rival had been with Guild. Bascomb & Bonfigli on the West Coast. 



The industry may not know this but it's standard operating procedure for tlj 
TvB to find out what's happened as soon as a spot account has cancelled out of th 
medium. 

Among its latest checks: 
Kleeber, which spent 8413,000 in tv in 1959. explained it was pulling away only for tl 
summer and would be back in the fall. 

Listerine, which gave the medium 82. 4 million gross in '59, said it had summer plan 

About the hottest thing there is today in measuring tv commercial effectivenel 
is taking a product group and polling viewers on whether they recall seeing any aj 
vertising of brands in that group. 

Blair recentlv had Pulse do a "recognition factor" survey on nationally advertised 5c J 
10£ candy bars and the percentages of recall came out this way: 



CANDY BAR BOSTON 


CINCINNATI 


LOS ANGELK! 


Rollo (Necco)* 16.7 


17.1 


17.5 


Mounds (Peter Paul)* 10.3 


12.7 


9.8 


Almond Joy 1 Peter Paul ) * 5.8 


4.4 


6.9 


Milky Way (Mars) 4.7 


3.8 


1.7 


Chunky 8.3 


1.8 


1.2 


*These are piggy-backed commercials. 







Revlon's spot tv and radio campaign on Sunbath will come out of C. J. LaRoche, evi 
though the agency resigned the account several months ago. 

Between 25-30 markets will be used from 30 May to July Fourth, with an expenditure 
around $150,000. 

Incidentally, the total volume from all brand sunburn lotions and oils is less than S 
million. 

For other nows coverage In thle issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 
Spot Buys, page 58; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 67; spons 
Hears, page 70; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 82; and Film-Scope, page 68. 




BUT 

WHAT 
ABOUT 
ICE? 



Time-buyer Socrates, visiting Washington, D. C, has 
been shown the logic of combination buying on 
WMAL-TV and affiliate WSVA-TV. The final piece 
of logic is a cocktail party, where a discussion of 
schedule constr